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BaoFeng New To GMRS

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#21 berkinet

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Posted 15 May 2019 - 09:47 PM

I appreciate the tip... In the pack (besides the factory battery pack) I have 4 extra battery packs.  I hadn't thought about getting a battery pack that holds alkalines.  I'll give that some consideration.... Thank you

Keep three factors in mind.
1) In an emergency you will not want to, or even be unable to, recharge batteries.
2) The shelf life of most rechargeable batteries (how long they will hold a charge) is horrible, alkaline batteries have shelf lives of up to 10 years.
3) The useful in-use life of an alkaline pack is much better than most rechargeables.
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#22 TK68

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Posted 16 May 2019 - 02:19 PM

3) The useful in-use life of an alkaline pack is much better than most rechargeables.



#23 TK68

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Posted 16 May 2019 - 02:22 PM

Not knowing the difference between the different types of batteries, would the AAA Energizer Ultimate Lithium batteries be good to use or would alkaline be better?

#24 berkinet

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Posted 16 May 2019 - 02:55 PM

Not knowing the difference between the different types of batteries, would the AAA Energizer Ultimate Lithium batteries be good to use or would alkaline be better?


Lithium batteries are expensive and probably overkill. I would use any good quality alkalines. In other words stay away from the cheap brands.

Everything we hear is an opinion, not a fact. Everything we see is a perspective, not the truth.

-- Marcus Aurelius


#25 Jones

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Posted 16 May 2019 - 08:53 PM

I'm not trying to endorse any specific battery, and I am not affiliated with the company in any way, but I have had very good luck in the past with Rayovac brand alkaline batteries.  I can usually find them at MUCH cheaper prices than the Energizer or Duracell brands, and they work every bit as well.

 

This statement is based on my experience and opinion. As always, YMMV.


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#26 taco6513

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Posted 17 May 2019 - 07:46 AM

May look at the "SPOT" satellite messenger. I have a iridium satellite phone. To expensive to keep on all the time. I buy a prepaid card when my daughter travels outside the USA.

Satellite phone would cost about $500 per year to keep on with an emergency plan. The "SPOT" unit I beleave is  about $100 per year and does some other things.

WRCW870



#27 kidphc

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Posted 17 May 2019 - 07:55 AM

May look at the "SPOT" satellite messenger. I have a iridium satellite phone. To expensive to keep on all the time. I buy a prepaid card when my daughter travels outside the USA.

Satellite phone would cost about $500 per year to keep on with an emergency plan. The "SPOT" unit I beleave is  about $100 per year and does some other things.

WRCW870

 

I had mentioned both before to him. I believe, well in my case it would be cost prohibited. I only say this because he mentioned 6 radios before. 

 

I do agree with your post though, from see where he generally lives. Even an APRS system with messaging may not cut it.



#28 TK68

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Posted 17 May 2019 - 04:42 PM

Lithium batteries are expensive and probably overkill. I would use any good quality alkalines. In other words stay away from the cheap brands.

 

Thanks for the suggestions,,,I ordered some of those BaoFeng Alkaline Batteries, and found a decent deal on a some good batteries...



#29 TK68

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Posted 17 May 2019 - 04:52 PM

I had mentioned both before to him. I believe, well in my case it would be cost prohibited. I only say this because he mentioned 6 radios before. 

 

I do agree with your post though, from see where he generally lives. Even an APRS system with messaging may not cut it.

 

I wish I could afford a sat phone for all my family members, but the cost would be way too high for me.  Not knowing what an APRS system is, I googled it and stumbled across this website with a TNC3:  http://www.mobilinkd...jwaAossEALw_wcB  I have no idea if something like this would be useful for me or not.  I'm not well educated when it comes to the technical of different electronics, and even what some are used for.



#30 TK68

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Posted 17 May 2019 - 04:55 PM

I'm not trying to endorse any specific battery, and I am not affiliated with the company in any way, but I have had very good luck in the past with Rayovac brand alkaline batteries.  I can usually find them at MUCH cheaper prices than the Energizer or Duracell brands, and they work every bit as well.

 

This statement is based on my experience and opinion. As always, YMMV.

 

Thank you for the suggestion.  When it comes to batteries and not knowing much about them, as well as all the brands to choose from, I would have a hard time figuring out which ones to go with.



#31 kidphc

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Posted 17 May 2019 - 05:15 PM

APRS is essentially automated packet radio system. Think of a TNC as a modem for your radio. You still need access to a 20 or 70cm repeater that has a connection to the internet to send a package out.

There are commercially available aprs units with GPS that are really small and used by hikers. some are even connected to the satellites. Others can text and send emails as well as some limited functions with a subscription. check into the earlier congestion of spot.

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#32 rchjr79

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Posted 30 July 2019 - 11:08 PM

Hi,  Just a thought about your backpack.   Once you get it all packed, take it for a couple of miles through the woods.  You might need to rethink your equipment list.  I was surprised when I did that and had to adjust my weight limit some.  You never know when you might have to leave your vehicle and hoof it.  Just a thought.


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#33 MLee

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Posted 31 July 2019 - 08:34 AM

I agree with Jones on the Rayovac batteries.  Read that suggestion on a flashlight forum and tried it myself, with the same results.



#34 kb2ztx

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Posted 01 August 2019 - 11:17 AM

APRS is essentially automated packet radio system. Think of a TNC as a modem for your radio. You still need access to a 20 or 70cm repeater that has a connection to the internet to send a package out.

There are commercially available aprs units with GPS that are really small and used by hikers. some are even connected to the satellites. Others can text and send emails as well as some limited functions with a subscription. check into the earlier congestion of spot.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk

 

Actually APRS is not dependant on either 2mtr or 70cm repeaters. In the US the primary channel is 144.390. There are many places that APRS actually does work that a 2m or 440 machine may not. One advantage is you dont need to change the frequency. The new Vertex FT2D radio has built in GPS and is ideal to hike with. I have the FT1D and use it specifically for APRS while hiking or traveling. Granted there are still holes, you still need good batteries and a decent antenna but its another tool in the tool box.



#35 axorlov

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Posted 01 August 2019 - 08:56 PM

I'm sure kidphc was talking about digipeaters and i-gates, not your regular voice FM repeater. Without digipeater in a good location the APRS network shrinks down to the range of simplex HT and even shorter (being packet without error correction, requiring better signal than FM voice).

I also use my FT1XD when hiking, however, here in California, the places covered by digipeaters most often also have cell connection. The exceptions are rare, one such weird place is a lake nearby - cell connection non-existent, but digipeater is up high and functioning. The Sierra foothills, where I like to camp or just tag around on foot/skies/bicycle etc has an abysmal coverage by APRS, it's like one huge black hole.



#36 kidphc

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Posted 02 August 2019 - 08:52 AM

I'm sure kidphc was talking about digipeaters and i-gates, not your regular voice FM repeater. Without digipeater in a good location the APRS network shrinks down to the range of simplex HT and even shorter (being packet without error correction, requiring better signal than FM voice).

I also use my FT1XD when hiking, however, here in California, the places covered by digipeaters most often also have cell connection. The exceptions are rare, one such weird place is a lake nearby - cell connection non-existent, but digipeater is up high and functioning. The Sierra foothills, where I like to camp or just tag around on foot/skies/bicycle etc has an abysmal coverage by APRS, it's like one huge black hole.

Yes. should of have elaborated a bit.  For true emergency coms a satellite phone and a gps unit are hard to beat, well minus the cost.







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