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Show me any legal GMRS radios,there are none.


WRFS771
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So a person using a legal FRS only radio and a licensed GMRS user using a Part 95 certified radio can’t communicate for example? That’s after the FCC changed the frequency assignments so simplex operation was facilitated between the two?

The new Part 95 specifically authorizes FRS/GMRS users to talk to each other. There’s no other interpretation

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 I'm confused as to why they would be permitted to be sold if they aren't technically legal at least somewhere.  That'd be like an illegal drug being permitted to be sold but not used.  Then again, with the federal government, nothing really surprises me.

 

Maybe legal for licensed HAM operators?

 

I just thought of one use that should be 100% legal.  They receive FM radio! Lol! :D

 

They are legal receivers on all frequencies 

 

As yet, its not illegal to own a transmitter of almost any type.  If you have the cash you can buy a commercial TV transmitter, you just can't transmit on it without a license.

 

These things may change as the government perceives the populace to be a threat.

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So Michael are you getting a KG-UV9G?  If so please wrote a review like you did for the KG-805G.  I looked at the list of KG-UV9G channels, impressive... https://k5q5c8s7.rocketcdn.me/wp-content/uploads/BetterSafeRadio-Wouxun-KG-UV9G-GMRS-SHTF-Custom-Programming-Chart-v1a-880ch-071920.pdf The only thing missing was CB, joking.  

Jack

The Wouxun KG-805G, of which I own 2, has 128 memories for storing your choice of GMRS repeater pairs and squelch codes. Each memory can be custom named as well.

The radio has full legal access to all 22 GMRS simplex channels plus the 8 main GMRS repeater input channels.

Wouxun also has a new one expected to be released in October. A web search will turn it up. It is the KG-UV9G, a GMRS specific version of their KG-UV9D amateur radio.

Michael
WRHS965



Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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So a person using a legal FRS only radio and a licensed GMRS user using a Part 95 certified radio can’t communicate for example? That’s after the FCC changed the frequency assignments so simplex operation was facilitated between the two?

You are changing the parameters of the original question, which was limited to GMRS operator to non-licensed operator.

 

GMRS licensed operator can communicate with FRS operator - on FRS 'channels' (frequencies).

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I set my radio on scan the last 24 hours and mom and her toddler son were on channel 19 recently. 8-14 should be FRS but people that buy the bubble pack's are putting batteries in and start talking because who ever reads the manuals? Should (or would) anyone that is licensed say anything that they are on the wrong channel or am I pushing sand against the tide? In the end tough to regulate the airwaves it seems.

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I set my radio on scan the last 24 hours and mom and her toddler son were on channel 19 recently. 8-14 should be FRS but people that buy the bubble pack's are putting batteries in and start talking because who ever reads the manuals? Should (or would) anyone that is licensed say anything that they are on the wrong channel or am I pushing sand against the tide? In the end tough to regulate the airwaves it seems.

If they are “bubble pack” radios, they are automatically low power on 8 through 14. They are built that way and can not be adjusted by the user. Thus they are totally legal.
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I am not saying that the radios are illegal, just users using them on channels other than 8-14. I would assume that mom and jr. talking on CH19 don't have a GMRS license.

FRS use of all 22 simplex GMRS/FRS channels is now legal. You are creating rules that don’t exist.

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I am not saying that the radios are illegal, just users using them on channels other than 8-14. I would assume that mom and jr. talking on CH19 don't have a GMRS license.

 

Every year for a few weeks after Christmas there is a LOT of simplex chatter. Unfortunately a lot of those folks are using repeater output frequencies (462.725 for example). Frankly it's very annoying!

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Good Day MacJack.

 

No, I have no intent to purchase the KG-UV9P Radio. Why you ask?

 

It does not appear to offer better receive performance than the 805G. I already own the KG-UV9P which has the exact same innards and often times I have both the 805G and UV9P side by side tuned to same frequency or scanning the same frequencies. More times than not, the 805G receives the same or slightly better.

The radio is not physically built any better than the 805G.

The screen is not usable outdoors during daylight hours.

The couple of features it has that are of interest don’t make it worth twice the price to me.

While I love the true dual receive capability and appreciate a radio with it, the UV9 does not mute the second channel while you are actually talking and thus interferes with your transmissions, so it gets turned off frequently because it is a hinderance.

I don’t need another scanner.

 

Hope that helps.

 

So Michael are you getting a KG-UV9G? If so please wrote a review like you did for the KG-805G. I looked at the list of KG-UV9G channels, impressive... https://k5q5c8s7.rocketcdn.me/wp-content/uploads/BetterSafeRadio-Wouxun-KG-UV9G-GMRS-SHTF-Custom-Programming-Chart-v1a-880ch-071920.pdf The only thing missing was CB, joking.

Jack

 

Michael

WRHS965

KE8PLM

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You are changing the parameters of the original question, which was limited to GMRS operator to non-licensed operator.

 

GMRS licensed operator can communicate with FRS operator - on FRS 'channels' (frequencies).

The post I responded to was:

 

"No, just as a licensed amateur operator cannot legally communicate with an unlicensed person, neither can a licensed GMRS operator legally communicate with an unlicensed person."

 

The nature of the "unlicensed person" was not specified in the post so I used the widest definition that is confined to FRS and GMRS services. It's obvious the FRS operators are not directly licensed by the FCC but communications between licensed GMRS operators and the "unlicensed person", A.K.A. FRS operator, is in fact permitted. That was the point. To add a finer point FRS operators who are using their radios are authorized as licensed by rule, so by some measure they are licensed.

 

While the statement about the amateur operator is correct, everyone MUST have a valid call sign thus licensed, but when extending the analogy to GMRS/FRS, which shares the same simplex frequencies it breaks down.

 

I think when statements like the quote above are made they should be more qualified. Too often new people get needlessly confused. That's the last thing needed here.

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I did not know you had a KG-UV9P already.  You had done a great review of the KG-805G good and bad.  Thank you for your review of your KG-UV9P in your reply.  This helps me see what I should look for through your eyes and usage.  Thanks so much.

Jack

Good Day MacJack.

No, I have no intent to purchase the KG-UV9P Radio. Why you ask?

It does not appear to offer better receive performance than the 805G. I already own the KG-UV9P which has the exact same innards and often times I have both the 805G and UV9P side by side tuned to same frequency or scanning the same frequencies. More times than not, the 805G receives the same or slightly better.
The radio is not physically built any better than the 805G.
The screen is not usable outdoors during daylight hours.
The couple of features it has that are of interest don’t make it worth twice the price to me.
While I love the true dual receive capability and appreciate a radio with it, the UV9 does not mute the second channel while you are actually talking and thus interferes with your transmissions, so it gets turned off frequently because it is a hinderance.
I don’t need another scanner.

Hope that helps.



Michael
WRHS965
KE8PLM

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I think when statements like the quote above are made they should be more qualified. Too often new people get needlessly confused. That's the last thing needed here.

 

Well then, if a licensed GMRS operator is communicating with an licensed-by-rule FRS operator, s/he is doing so as an FRS operator, if we truly wish to be precisely accurate.  ;)

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  • 2 months later...

I know this is an old reply on my part but just starting tomorrow with my G Daughter studying for Ham Ticket.  So I saw the Wouxun KG-UV8H... and look forward to your comments for this radio for a Tech level 1 or General level 2 operator...  

 

Thank you for your open and honest reply, that is why I value you helping me in the GMRS and now in my Ham pathway.

Jack

Good Day MacJack.

No, I have no intent to purchase the KG-UV9P Radio. Why you ask?

It does not appear to offer better receive performance than the 805G. I already own the KG-UV9P which has the exact same innards and often times I have both the 805G and UV9P side by side tuned to same frequency or scanning the same frequencies. More times than not, the 805G receives the same or slightly better.
The radio is not physically built any better than the 805G.
The screen is not usable outdoors during daylight hours.
The couple of features it has that are of interest don’t make it worth twice the price to me.
While I love the true dual receive capability and appreciate a radio with it, the UV9 does not mute the second channel while you are actually talking and thus interferes with your transmissions, so it gets turned off frequently because it is a hinderance.
I don’t need another scanner.

Hope that helps.



Michael
WRHS965
KE8PLM

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I know this is an old reply on my part but just starting tomorrow with my G Daughter studying for Ham Ticket.  So I saw the Wouxun KG-UV8H... and look forward to your comments for this radio for a Tech level 1 or General level 2 operator...  

 

Thank you for your open and honest reply, that is why I value you helping me in the GMRS and now in my Ham pathway.

Jack

Well if you don’t mind experimenting with another Chinese radio take a look at the TYT TH-350. It’s a tri-band radio and they can be had for $70. Not that much more expensive that the typical Baofeng type.

 

The radio will work out of band, however you have to know the “secret” keyboard option and passcode to change the default frequency limits. And yes I have one in my HT collection. It seems to perform well without the annoying bleed through from close by transmitters on adjacent frequencies.

https://www.buytwowayradios.com/tyt-th-350.html

 

The thing with this radio is the back light uses a white LED and it’s EXTREMELY BRIGHT. You could use it as a flash light. In the dark it could ruin your night vision temporarily. Some might find the bright back light an advantage.

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There are no legal GMRS radios on the market if they have 22 channels. Why?

 

Channel 8-14 are dedicated FRS channels and transmit power on those channels is .5 watts.

Only blister packs meet the power with fixed antenna.

But the blister packs are illegal if they transmit on channels above 14

 

Baofeng radios like the UV5R

And 888s are also illegal to transmit on GMRS

if a GMRS users transmission 8-14 they are breaking the stupid rules because those radios transmit on low at 1 watt and dont have fixed antennas.

The same with all Amateur radio equipment.

The FCC has made mess by keeping FRS.

Too many illegal users

GMRS has the potential to be a great secondary communication network for people that dont have reliable Cell coverage.

The FCC when they approve a cell tower and a cell provider a license, require them to install and maintain a GMRS repeater.

 

That makes it possible for nation wide radio communications with even a 5 watt radio.

 

The .5 fixed antenna users can pay a $5 GMRS annual fee. No repeater use

End the FRS frequencies.

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It has been a while, so what's new with GMRS. Well Beofeng has come out with a GMRS/FRS radio different than the Btech V-1

It is marginal at best to comply, it has a fixed antenna which is more for FRS compliance.

However under new FCC rules, FRS/GMRS radios cant be combined any longer meaning the BTECH v-1 no longer complies but still have the part 95 endorsement.

There are a few DMR radios that got under the radar and were also part95 approved.

 

The commerical radios seemed to be the best option the Kenwood 373G handheld radios price point mad them reasonable.

 

I have heard some good feedback on the Wouxon (spelling?) Pronounced Ocean

gmrs radios.

Fir a base unit I got a great 30 watt former commercial radio believe it or not its a midland UHF radio 450-470 frequency range that was used for a smaller fire department post

 

Former old stock or lightly used commercial UHF radios that were part 95 approved seems to meet the need perfectly.

Opening them up and inspecting components through members in our group was a great learning experience.

In fact our GMRS repeater network here in Georgia is the largest connected repeater network in the USA

We also have the most GMRS users that also hold their Amateur radio licences as well.

 

Overall, a kit has been learned over the past year.

SWR readings can be optimized with magnetic mounts by checking corner roof readings..also a good idea to check SWR before permanent antenna installation for mobile radios.

Rhe ghost antenna for 450-470 are great antennas for mobile. Or the 400-480 if you also have HAM radio equipment and licence.

Zello has been good for VOIP over repeaters, we are making a change and will update everyone soon on the new VOIP service to our network the move that will open many more abilities and be in compliance for GMRS use.

Thanks all.

William

WRFS771

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When people can buy a set of bubble-pack radios for $19.95 to $29.95 they won’t bother paying a license fee. The whole farce where the manufacturers and the FCC assumed people would get a GMRS license to operate the dual use radios sold at the time was a failure. They made the non-compliance problem go away by changing the rules so the former non-compliant radios are now classified as FRS and no personal license required.

 

Be careful what you wish for. Canadian GMRS is license free, no repeater access and limited to 5 watts on the same channels used here in the US except on 8-14. Effectively it’s a bit higher power version of our FRS service. The FCC could do that just to make the nuisance of doing the paperwork go away. The repeater owners would get a royal screwing.

 

Remember the FCC is going to take the path of least resistance, administrative work. They did that with the Amateur Radio Service when they reduced the license classes to just 3.

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I will end on This final note, using the FCC ID search to see if a commercial radio was part 95 approved is very helpful.

The quality (usually to military specs) is far superior to the GMRS specific radio market.

Commercial handheld radios are built for harsh conditions where as the radios made just for GMRS are made with low quality components and exterior casings.

Commercial approved radios have the ability to program at least 250 repeaters or simplex compared to Most GMRS that have a small number of repeaters you can program.

However, btech radios are inexpensive and have broadcast radio and NOAA available for GMRS users..NOAA is 2m VHF and there are few weather broadcasts in the 450-470 range if any for most areas.

Depends of the tradeoff you want or need.

A 4-5 watt handheld on our repeater network, I get 40 Miles in solid to our main repeaters, making it possible to hold a good conversation from metro Atlanta to Chattanooga TN without issue on most good days.

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  • 11 months later...

Not sure if this was specifically said,, so if it was, I am repeating it.

If you are communicating with an FRS user that is using an FRS radio and is unlicensed then YOU are using that service.

Since you are using that service and NOT GMRS which is licensed then YOUR radio needs to comply with the service it's being used on.  GMRS and commercial radios are NOT compliant with the rules of FRS and therefore can't really be used to communicate on that service even if the frequencies are the same. 

Would you get dinged for doing it, PROBABLY not.  Unless there were other factors involved.  But if the FCC really wanted to they could fine you and pull your license.

 

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25 minutes ago, WRKC935 said:

If you are communicating with an FRS user that is using an FRS radio and is unlicensed then YOU are using that service.

Since you are using that service and NOT GMRS which is licensed then YOUR radio needs to comply with the service it's being used on.  GMRS and commercial radios are NOT compliant with the rules of FRS and therefore can't really be used to communicate on that service even if the frequencies are the same. 

That is not correct.  The rules for both services clearly allow interoperability with users of the other service.  Nowhere does it say, "If you are using a GMRS radio to talk to an FRS radio, then you are an FRS user".  Part 90 radios are not type-accepted for either service, although the FCC has stated that they are not going to track people down for using one on GMRS unless they are causing other issues.  (The exception would be an older model that had dual 90/95 certification back when that was permitted.)

§ 95.1731 Permissible GMRS uses.

The operator of a GMRS station may use that station for two-way plain language voice communications with other GMRS stations and with FRS units concerning personal or business activities.

§ 95.531 Permissible FRS uses.

FRS units are primarily used for short-distance two-way voice communications between individuals.

(c) GMRS stations. FRS units normally communicate with other FRS units, but may also be used to communicate with General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) stations.

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3 hours ago, WRKC935 said:

Not sure if this was specifically said,, so if it was, I am repeating it.

If you are communicating with an FRS user that is using an FRS radio and is unlicensed then YOU are using that service.

Since you are using that service and NOT GMRS which is licensed then YOUR radio needs to comply with the service it's being used on.  GMRS and commercial radios are NOT compliant with the rules of FRS and therefore can't really be used to communicate on that service even if the frequencies are the same. 

Would you get dinged for doing it, PROBABLY not.  Unless there were other factors involved.  But if the FCC really wanted to they could fine you and pull your license.

 

Boy, are you in the wrong lane!

And thanks for pumping up an 11 month old thread just to do it, too!

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