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Organizing Repeaters


pdccd
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Hello Everyone,

I'm new to GMRS repeaters and civilian comms in general so i'm hoping for some sage advice from others here. I freely acknowledge that it's likely some gap in my understanding of GMRS repeaters that's brought this up. As I've recently gotten my ZA license, i've applied for permission for access to multiple repeaters that exist in my geography (Puget Sound, Wa). As part of my families emergency plan, i'd like to organize a way for my Wife and I to stay in contact for brief sitreps at predetermined times when cell comms are down. I'll eventually determine key times to "check in" until we can find each other. Anyway, i'm noticing that there's repeaters called OLYCOM (1,2,3) run by the Radio of Hope network and repeaters called Seattle #1, #2 etc. And finally another SeaTac Repeater Association. The thing i'm not wrapping my head around is that several of these are running on the same Receive and Transmit frequencies and using travel tone (removed for security), or no tone. Now some of the repeaters in this area are running different tones on the same freq's also for various purposes it appears. Anyway, since i'm a fan of redundant systems, I plan to create a list of repeaters in my area (Using RTSystems for my radio) that I can get access to for my family. One key issue is this all has to be relatively intuitive for my Wife as the technical aspect of this project is challenging for her. 

 

So, my question, how do you folks organize all this? I also hope to use these radios for travel, but it seems trying to organize all this is going to get messy. Am I overthinking it, or misunderstanding how this is supposed to work? Or have I just wandered in over my head lol? Basically i've got 4 or 5 individual repeaters all operating on 462.625/467.625 with (Tones of removed for security), or open. Then there's the others on other gmrs repeater freq's. For example i'm listening to the same conversation on SEATAC ASSOCIATION (462.62500/467.62500 (removed) and Seattle #4 (462.62500/467.62500 open) at the same time on my dual band radio. I think i understand how/why, but i'm not sure how else to organize the different tones required by the different repeaters other than saving them individually on our radios.

 

Sorry if this doesn't make sense.  If i'm not clear don't hesitate to ask for clarification, and thanks for any time you can share. 

 

Pete

WRJI737

Edited by pdccd
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Pete

Based on your license address the SeaTac repeater association repeater may be your best bet. It has a very wide coverage. This is a newer repeater than the Seattle repeaters. I think what repeater owners do is look at the existing repeaters in the PL tones and they choose a different PL tone so they do not cause interference.

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Probably the biggest thing I see to clarify is the tones...think of them as a filter. if you have the right tone, the filter opens. So when you transmit on .625/xxx.x tone, SEATAC hears (right tone to pass the filter), and retransmits. However, since Seattle#4 has no filter (no tone), it ALSO hears and retransmits.

 

And individual entries is how I organized mine, I have separate entries for each repeater (central 1, Sierra 2) with the appropriate tones, saved by name. On my ht, I also programmed an extra set repeater channels again for travel usage.

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A spread sheet to start with as there are only 8 frequencies, I listed all using the travel code, then I added all frequencies and their location using the other PL codes. If your transmitter is capable of adding additional frequencies this makes it simple if not as suggested above program the one in your area that covers the major area you will travel in!

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Thanks Guys. So It sounds like the derived convention is list the frequencies multiple times with the individual necessary instance based on PL tones?. ie.: 

462.62500/467.62500 001hz- Seatac Association

462.62500/467.62500 002/003hz OlyCom #1                               Maybe in the notes for reference the general location

462.62500/467.62500 007hz -Seattle #3

462.62500/467.62500 009hz/010hz- Seattle #1

462.62500/467.62500 020/030hz-OlyCom #3                                                             Tiger Mountain

 

 

Something along those lines? Mike, is there any way you'd be willing to share your spreadsheet format? I'm having a hard time visualizing it. 

 

 

I feel like I've caught a disease. Why is this so much fun? lol. 

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Pete

Based on your license address the SeaTac repeater association repeater may be your best bet. It has a very wide coverage. This is a newer repeater than the Seattle repeaters. I think what repeater owners do is look at the existing repeaters in the PL tones and they choose a different PL tone so they do not cause interference.

Thanks Linus. I tried to request a signal report today from them after listening for a couple of hours and just after a couple people cleared and monitored, but no response. Later in the day I tried the same for the Tiger Mountain Repeater (OlyComm#3) and received multiple checks around the region by a number of nice folks. Am I too old to say how exciting that was? Anyway, it seemed like I did better on Tiger Mountain? Of course there could be a number of reasons for that result. Regardless thank you kindly for the suggestion. That was definately information I didn't know (repeater age). The maps showing where the repeaters are on myGMRS don't seem very accurate either so it's hard to tell coverage. Not to mention prior to my Signal Report Request if my radio was even getting out. 

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I recently configured my HT to accommodate a variety of local repeaters. I am using the Wouxun KG-805G Radio and it has 128 memory locations.

 

The radio requires software to add frequencies to the memories, but CTCSS and DCS codes can be changed via front-panel controls on the radio.

 

I chose to program the radio with 8 memories for every available repeater pair (64 total). I then named them as 550A to 550H, 575A to 575H and so on. This sets me up to be able to store 8 different code combinations for any given frequency. Then, I added tones for local repeaters to the first one, two or three memories in each range This leaves me with the memories ready to receive tones as I see fit when I am traveling, without having to change my local ones.

 

Perhaps this will be useful to you.

 

Michael

WRHS965

 

 

 

 

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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I chose to program the radio with 8 memories for every available repeater pair (64 total). I then named them as 550A to 550H, 575A to 575H and so on. This sets me up to be able to store 8 different code combinations for any given frequency. Then, I added tones for local repeaters to the first one, two or three memories in each range This leaves me with the memories ready to receive tones as I see fit when I am traveling, without having to change my local ones.

 

 

that's similar to what i alluded to with mine (also the wouxun). normal 1-22 with no codes, likewise for 15r-22r. following that i have my 3 local repeaters, by name and with the appropriate codes, and then the repeater channels again as new15r-new22r, to have a couple open repeater slots on each channel for travels.

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