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Need reliable radio on our farm


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#21 PRadio

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Posted 15 October 2020 - 02:14 PM

The OP has not been back.


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#22 berkinet

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Posted 15 October 2020 - 02:20 PM

The OP has not been back.

True. However... a) he was a guest. Hopefully he will join at some point. B) Also hopefully, maybe someone else will benefit from this discussion.


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Everything we hear is an opinion, not a fact. Everything we see is a perspective, not the truth.

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#23 Guest_JRHill_*

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Posted 18 October 2020 - 11:33 AM

True. However... a) he was a guest. Hopefully he will join at some point. B) Also hopefully, maybe someone else will benefit from this discussion.

 

Since he didn't have a Call Sign to register he probably couldn't get notifications of responses? That would also be my problem as well. I found this forum looking for MURS info and saw the thread asking if anyone uses MURS anymore. I wanted to create a profile and contribute then was stalled since I didn't have a call sign to register.

 

Anyway, I stumbled into MURS when investigating a long range transmitter for security. I came across Dakota Alert products which use MURS. I bought the base unit (RX/TX) and two UV sensors (TX). They worked great even through dense forest at 1/4 mile. I bought two more but the furthest out at less than 1/2 mile was flaky and static prone at the best or just plain out of service range. I put up a discone and wow - excellent. So I bought the MURS handheld so to communicate back to the house plus get the zone alarms when out and about. (there is no cell service here.)

 

Just this morning the DW was out scoping for the 40pt buck and tried to call me at home. I received her crystal clear but the handheld could not get my reply. :-( She was just past 1/4 mile and with a relatively straight shot but through a lot of trees. Family radio service is a joke here and I believe I could yell further than this can RX/TX. And I do have a base unit and two handhelds on 152.625 but have several reasons for not putting them back in service.

 

Lastly, I'll save the URL to this thread and check back to see if I get a tip for registering without a call sign.

 

Be well, JRH



#24 Guest_Kevin_*

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Posted 18 October 2020 - 07:38 PM

Thanks to all for the open dialog. Much appreciated. I apologize for the delay in getting back to you guys. Like most, i am a busy guy. I read all posts and learning a lot. I signed up and created a draft GMRS license purchase request as it just seems like a good thing regardless of the farm communications solution chosen. Will pay for license sometime this week.

 

I need to read the posts a second time to let it all sink in. Then, I will write another update. We are testing some small and relatively cheap simplex Midland GTX1050 radios. Will know more in November. We have cattle rancher on the farm full-time. We are there only a few times per year to manage the farm and for hunting season with family and friends.

 

Thanks to the GMRS website and many posts including this thread, I now know what simplex and duplex is and how a repeater works. Still real fuzzy on all the lingo/terminology used on the site. But, with more reading I will learn and appreciate over time. A repeater at the house with simplex in the field seems worthy of consideration.

 

Early tests show that transmissions made by one of us in open spaces on the farm are able to be heard at all the places we have tested so far on the farm. However, when one of us tried to reply back with a transmission to the person in the open valley, the transmissions were not heard by most of us. Seems the obstructions like trees and rolling hills/ridgelines prevented communication. The house is not the highest point on the property. We will be doing more tests and update this thread at the end of November.

 

Thank You!

Kevin 



#25 Guest_Kevin_*

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Posted 18 October 2020 - 07:44 PM

Forgot to mention that the idea of the 15-40 watt truck GMRS radio testing mentioned does sound like a very good idea. Found a couple online that should do the trick. Will update near the end of November.

 

Thanks,

Kevin



#26 Lscott

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Posted 19 October 2020 - 09:56 AM

Are you sure about the frequency, 152.625, because that's not one of the offical MURS channels.



#27 gman1971

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Posted 19 October 2020 - 10:32 AM

Lscott is right:

 

MURS channels are 151.82, 151.88, 151,94, 154.57, 154.6 Mhz.



#28 Guest_JRHill_*

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Posted 19 October 2020 - 03:17 PM

Lscott is right:

 

MURS channels are 151.82, 151.88, 151,94, 154.57, 154.6 Mhz.

 

Y'all are correct. In the mid-'90's I had purchased a 20 watt Motorola base, antenna/cable and two Uniden handhelds on 152.625 from a radio shop in a neighboring town to fix the fact that there was no (at the time) analog cell signal to our house in a canyon. Digital was spotty then. Ah, the days of the bag phone and multi hundred dollar cell phone bills. I was told that it was a business band and that since they did virtually everyone else's radios in that part of the state there wouldn't be any cross talk and they knew which freq to pick. It worked great. And there was no license required. Then. Still?

 

We live in a different place now and I brought the radios with me. I tried it here with a cheap mobile antenna for a bit but the DW hated the handhelds saying they were too heavy and bulky. Plus one of the Unidens has a volume problem (speaker or earbud). Plus the proper antenna/cable for it is pretty darned expensive. But I like it as its much more private and powerful than FRS or MURS. And it reaches for over a mile even with the tree cover and multiple canyons. I'm still pondering the issue as safety is crucial and it's very possible to be out alone with saws, dangerous roads and lions and tigers and bears, oh my! Seriously, it is something I want to fix but I've got a hodge podge of different equipment with no clear path to integrating the various radio/freqs so only one remote handheld is needed in the field.

 

Seems I'm not the only one researching solutions.

 

Best, JRH



#29 Jones

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Posted 20 October 2020 - 09:56 AM

I think perhaps he meant 151.625, which is the most used itinerant business frequency in the VHF band. Also Known As "The Red Dot Channel" and "The Weatherman Channel".



#30 Guest_JRHill_*

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Posted 22 October 2020 - 11:48 AM

I think perhaps he meant 151.625, which is the most used itinerant business frequency in the VHF band. Also Known As "The Red Dot Channel" and "The Weatherman Channel".

 

My error with a typo. It is 151.625.



#31 WQXU640

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Posted 23 October 2020 - 09:54 AM

I live north of Spokane. This area is mixed woodland and farmland. The terrain varies from "flat" valley floor to rolling hills, and mountains. I have my base station antenna (a 5/8 wavelength ground plane from RW antennas?) mounted 30 feet AGL. I can reach as far as 30 miles in some directions. Unless you have extreme changes in elevation on the farm, you may not need a repeater. If you mount antennas on vehicles and tractors, and put an elevated antenna at the house, you should be good to go.



#32 berkinet

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Posted 23 October 2020 - 10:37 AM

I live north of Spokane...

 

... Unless you have extreme changes in elevation on the farm, you may not need a repeater. If you mount antennas on vehicles and tractors, and put an elevated antenna at the house, you should be good to go.

In the Palouse?

 

If all communications are between the house and someone out in the field simplex communications might work well as you describe. However, if they envision communications between people out in the field, the story might be different.  As Kaiser cement trucks used to advertise "Find a need and fill it!"


Everything we hear is an opinion, not a fact. Everything we see is a perspective, not the truth.

-- Marcus Aurelius




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