Jump to content

Crazy question -- the future


STTScott
 Share

Recommended Posts

I'm a GMRS noob just getting back into amateur radio from SSB heydays, which means I'm a technical boob. So here's a theoretical question: Would it ever be possible for Bluetooth-like connections between radio and antenna, replacing coax cable? What would be the downsides?

 

I thought if this because I'm a renter and there's no possible way in my building to run coax to any sort of external antenna oarge or small. Compounding the problem is my windows all have diamond-mesh screenings since this is hurricane country, so my only option seems to be to sit outside on my patio or in my car.

 

Perhaps there's a technical whiz among us who can weigh on whether this could ever be possible.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

well, there is something called RF coupling, you often see this with through glass antennas, however no, there is no way that I have seen or heard of, to use bluetooth to connect a transmitter to an antenna.

There are ways to get around the problem though. One way would be to ask the landlord if you could run coax from the attic into a room through the wall. you would drill down into the header into a stud bay, install a single gang box with a cover. This would allow you to remove the coax when you move and replace the plate with a blank (if you do it right you can pass it off as a location you had a TV set up as well.) While not perfect, you can run an antenna inside of the attic and get reasonable results.

Another option would be to mount an antenna on an exterior wall (inside of the room) and work low power as to not flood the house with RF. This is least ideal however is better than nothing.

Lastly, if you are looking to use a repeater, the repeater owner may have RoIP set-up. You would need to contact the repeater owner for details on how to connect to the RoIP network as it usually requires a username/password.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

while i'll stay openminded to possibilities, i don't think it would be possible to carry the analog signal from the transmitter to the antenna; bluetooth between the mic and the transciever itself exists, at least in the CB arena.

 

alternatives do come to mind, though. do you have access to crawl or attic space?  while not ideal, attic space could provide a place to stash an antenna; it may be possible to cover up a small coax hole.  if there's a crawl space, a small hole to run coax under the subfloor to one of the vents to get a line outside for an antenna.

 

there are also ports you can install in a window screen to run a cable through (with the window open), and passthrough boxes to put in the window gap that you close the window to seal against.  running cable out at the crack of a doorway may be feasible as well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, I'm pretty new at this too, so take this comment with a large grain of salt. If you have a repeater nearby, maybe an interior directional antenna pointed directly at it will punch/squeeze adequate signal through.

 

I'm also in hurricane territory in NC and in my case omnidirectional is important (I wish the family would line their homes and apartments in a straight line for me, but they never seem to listen). 

 

And I'd like to extend a hearty "welcome back" to radio. If all heck breaks loose, as you and I know it does regularly with hurricanes, those cell phones go down with alarming regularity.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If the transmitter is at the antenna along with the necessary power the the transmitter can be coupled with Bluetooth with the GMRS (or other service) transmitter sending the signal. What people are assuming is there needs to be coax involved. The transmitter is part of the antenna. Think cellular BDAs or WiFi range extender.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

This is the best use for a garage repeater I can come up with.

 

Edited to add:  If you're trying to get __into__ a repeater, another option is a cross-band repeater that transmits on the repeater input channel.  Were it me, I'd use Motorola's DTR and DLR 900 MHz radios for the handheld terminals, since they can be set up with enough encryption to keep noobs and jammers out of your transmitter.  900 MHz digital is described to have excellent building penetration characteristics, so it should be able to find a path to your outdoor transmitter package without much trouble.

 

If you're not trying to get into someone else's repeater but just want to get outside your house with enough power to get reception, you might consider the Retevis RT97.  It's a five-watt "lunchbox" repeater that can be set up outside; all you need is enough power to make it through / around the cinderblock to transmit successfully, however you're going to be relying on your handheld and its indoor antenna for all the reception involved, which is unfortunate.

 

The DTR and DLR radios are (mostly) cross-compatible, albeit with some new features only existing in the DLR1020 and DLR1060.  However, the older DTR410 and DTR550 have removable antennas, which might be better suited to building a cross-band repeater.

 

Were it me, I'd use a DTR550 in the repeater box, and a DLR1020 as a wireless speaker-mic to access the rooftop radio in your situation.  Alternately, you could consider the (discontinued) DTR410 on eBay, as it may (frequently) be cheaper than a new DLR1020 in spite of greater capabilities in a lot of ways.

 

Yes, I have similar problems with running coax where I live.  :P

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Everything was going well until I read the words Retevis.... anything made by Retevis doesn't belong in the same sentence with Motorola. DTR radios are a far better radio than anything made by Retevis will ever be. At that point you might as well use a XPR4550 in FM UHF (GMRS) and a DTR7xx with a simple repeater controller. The DTR radios will get you the indoor performance, the XPR4550 mobile will give you the punch to get far, with an excellent receiver with a proper front end so it doesn't desense when the neighbor turns his LED exterior lighting.

 

G.

 

This is the best use for a garage repeater I can come up with.

 

Edited to add:  If you're trying to get __into__ a repeater, another option is a cross-band repeater that transmits on the repeater input channel.  Were it me, I'd use Motorola's DTR and DLR 900 MHz radios for the handheld terminals, since they can be set up with enough encryption to keep noobs and jammers out of your transmitter.  900 MHz digital is described to have excellent building penetration characteristics, so it should be able to find a path to your outdoor transmitter package without much trouble.

 

If you're not trying to get into someone else's repeater but just want to get outside your house with enough power to get reception, you might consider the Retevis RT97.  It's a five-watt "lunchbox" repeater that can be set up outside; all you need is enough power to make it through / around the cinderblock to transmit successfully, however you're going to be relying on your handheld and its indoor antenna for all the reception involved, which is unfortunate.

 

The DTR and DLR radios are (mostly) cross-compatible, albeit with some new features only existing in the DLR1020 and DLR1060.  However, the older DTR410 and DTR550 have removable antennas, which might be better suited to building a cross-band repeater.

 

Were it me, I'd use a DTR550 in the repeater box, and a DLR1020 as a wireless speaker-mic to access the rooftop radio in your situation.  Alternately, you could consider the (discontinued) DTR410 on eBay, as it may (frequently) be cheaper than a new DLR1020 in spite of greater capabilities in a lot of ways.

 

Yes, I have similar problems with running coax where I live.   :P

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use and Guidelines.