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Un-official GMRS travel channel?


dhardin53
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34 minutes ago, MichaelLAX said:

 

The context was using High, Medium or Low power when discussion Channels.

My attached photo was to show Channel 8 being set for LOW power; and not calling Channels 1-7 at 5 watts as Low, but Medium power.

In other words, you were nit-picking.  Nobody uses 8-14.  

 

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12 minutes ago, DanW said:

Nobody uses 8-14.  

 

Never Say Nobody: I hear traffic on those channels here in Los Angeles many times when I scan!

And when I asked a similar question here on this forum, someone indicated they are useful in a close-range context, when there is then limited interference by others.

But I will let you have the last word on this sub-topic!

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12 hours ago, DanW said:

Because nobody knows about channel 20.  How about this?  Scratch that line or move it to the border.  

That simply is not accurate. NSEA* has a repeater on 462.675/467.675 141.3 for well over fifty-one years now! Call sign is also the oldest in Illinois: KAA 8142

NSEA | History | GMRS | Repeaters | Projects | Skywarn

*Note: located in Parkridge, Illinois and covers most of Chicago.

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2 hours ago, MichaelLAX said:

Never Say Nobody: I hear traffic on those channels here in Los Angeles many times when I scan!

And when I asked a similar question here on this forum, someone indicated they are useful in a close-range context, when there is then limited interference by others.

But I will let you have the last word on this sub-topic!

Word:  Nobody.

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1 hour ago, n4gix said:

That simply is not accurate. NSEA* has a repeater on 462.675/467.675 141.3 for well over fifty-one years now! Call sign is also the oldest in Illinois: KAA 8142

NSEA | History | GMRS | Repeaters | Projects | Skywarn

*Note: located in Parkridge, Illinois and covers most of Chicago.

Look at context.  Nobody knows about channel 20 as a travel channel.  I'm sure that repeater didn't roll around the nation's freeways for 51 years.

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On 12/10/2021 at 7:02 PM, MichaelLAX said:

Ok so I did that and the first listing directed me to @rdunajewski’s post:

 

“Travel Tone is when a repeater enables 141.3 Hz as an open tone for travelers to use when in the area. For example, you could tune your radio to each GMRS repeater channel with 141.3 as your tone, and the repeaters with a Travel Tone are open for temporary use without permission. Good for when you don't have time to program each repeater along your route.

 

“ORI stands for the Open Repeater Initiative which was created by Popular Wireless many years ago. It was a way to indicate a repeater is open for any licensed GMRS operator to use without having to ask the owner's permission. These repeaters you can just jump on and use as long as you follow GMRS rules and use your callsign.“

I don’t see your supposed designation about Channel 20 (not that Channel 20 isn’t a good idea!)?

Did you specifically search for GMRS travel channel?

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11 hours ago, kb2ztx said:

How many people actually read their license after they get it ? Yes parts of the ADK park are above line A. Dealing with Canada is a PITA for LMR/Public Safety stuff.

 

Yeah, I read my license and saw the notes about the restriction. However what about all those 2 watt FRS radios, no license required, and almost nobody ever reads the instructions either.

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1 minute ago, MichaelLAX said:

You suggested: “travel tones for open repeaters” and that’s what I googled. 

Well search for GMRS travel channels too. I happen to use DuckDuckGo as my search engine, and sometimes “Startpage.com”, so if you use something else your results likely will be different.

The main point is people just propose something without doing any research first to see if the topic is covered elsewhere. I’ve spent hours looking for info at times going through hundreds of search engines hits. This topic comes up from time to time on this forum with same tired old answers given.

What this site needs is a well maintained FAQ section where issues like this are easily accessible to everyone.

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17 hours ago, DanW said:

Look at context.  Nobody knows about channel 20 as a travel channel.  I'm sure that repeater didn't roll around the nation's freeways for 51 years.

Channel 20 (462.675 MHz) as a road channel is a common knowledge.

Other things to be aware of: water is wet; Santa is not real; Earth is round; hot is on the left on the faucet; do not mix chlorine and ammonia; people do live to the north from Line A and these who don't, they sometimes travel into these uncharted wretched lands.

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21 hours ago, DanW said:

Look at context.  Nobody knows about channel 20 as a travel channel.  I'm sure that repeater didn't roll around the nation's freeways for 51 years.

You evidently did not read the history posted on the NSEA website. Unfortunately, many have either never learned, or have forgotten the history of GMRS.

Quote

NSEA members were instrumental in bringing UHF technology to other public service groups in CB, especially R.E.A.C.T. (Radio Emergency Associated Citizens Teams). Beginning in 1976 key NSEA members spent extensive time meeting with REACT teams in more than a dozen-and-a-half different states, bringing a portable repeater, together with a number of mobile and portable units for field demonstrations. NSEA members were able to obtain a temporary/unspecified license for the REACT national headquarters, which was utilized by the various teams around the country for the NSEA demonstrations.

As a result, over 200 personal use repeater systems (all on the same frequency) were set up throughout the United States. In recognition of this trend of explosive growth the Federal Communications Commission formally recognized our frequency as the national emergency and traveler's assistance channel in the Part 95A Rules and Regulations. NSEA maintains a firm commitment to providing the maximum accessibility to our repeater for traveling "transient" operators from out of town. Our repeater is now tone access with 141.3 Hz (4A) being the tone .

 

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Looking at the MyGMRS repeater database, there are 465 repeaters setup with tone 141.3. This includes all frequencies.

Looking at 462.675 (Channel 20) the number is between 103 and 113 depending on if they are using an output tone.

Looking at 462.650 (Channel 16) with tone 141.3, there are 38 repeaters setup as such.

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On 12/12/2021 at 7:27 PM, MichaelLAX said:

@DanWdoesn't seem to care about what others think; he has expressed over and over again in this thread his intention to use Channel 19.

So I'm glad I could get you guys excited about a discussion beyond your normal tech-talk induced state of arousal around here.

I must have missed all that chatter on channel 20 when rolling down the interstate.  Not sure how that could be, with the level of common knowledge you claim is out there.

 

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23 hours ago, DanW said:

So I'm glad I could get you guys excited about a discussion beyond your normal tech-talk induced state of arousal around here.

I must have missed all that chatter on channel 20 when rolling down the interstate.  Not sure how that could be, with the level of common knowledge you claim is out there.

 

So, you heard more traffic on 19?

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1 hour ago, AdmiralCochrane said:

So, you heard more traffic on 19?

Well, we have not spread the word on that yet, have we?  That's why it is an idea or proposal.  You might have picked up on that if you read the OP.  If you read a little further you'd find that the only mobile traffic I heard was from kids on channels 1-7 on bubble pack FRS radios.  Apparently they've done a better job than you internet forum PHD's at getting the word out. Lol!

 

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A simple Google search; "GMRS Travel Channel". I quoted the results in order that had anything to say about a "Travel Channel". I did not cherry pick the results. There were over 10 pages of results but for random samplings sake I just grabbed the first handful. Not one mentioned anything about an alternate travel channel. Every single one specifically mentioned Channel 20(462.675MHz) and most went on to say "with a PL of 141.3Hz"

@DanW I'm an open minded person. Please explain why everyone should jump convention and a set precedent because you think Channel 19 is "easier" ? Here's one even better, try going to some other GMRS forums and make the pitch for channel 19 being the "new" travel channel. I'm willing to wager that you will be informed of the past precedent of Channel 20. From my chair this looks like a done deal and common knowledge that 462.675 is the travelers channel. Does anyone disagree?
 

Quote

 

https://www.reddit.com/r/gmrs/comments/khjzvd/gmrs_channel_for_road_travel/

Channel 20(462.675MHz) with a PL of 141.3Hz is generally considered the 'travel/calling' frequency on GMRS

 

 

Quote

 

https://forums.radioreference.com/threads/the-history-behind-462-675-mhz-and-the-travel-tone.374402/

I came across the North Shore Emergency Association's website recently and found their club history page interesting:
nsea.com/nseainfo.htm
This link briefly discusses how the "travel tone" of 141.3 Hz and the national calling/emergency frequency of 462.675 MHz came to be. NSEA was one of the very first adopters of GMRS in the early 1970s, then the Class "A" Citizens Band.

 

 

Quote

 

https://www.hfunderground.com/wiki/GMRS

Calling frequency 462.675 MHz CTCSS 141.3 Hz (sometimes referred to as the "travel channel")

 

 

Quote

 

https://www.survivalistboards.com/threads/wilderness-protocol-and-travel-tones.173425/

The GMRS Travel Tone and unofficial travel and assistance frequency is a way to allow GMRS users to get assistance when they are outside of their home area. It is a specific tone and frequency combo, 141.3HZ PL and 462.675 duplex or simplex that is defined nationwide

 

 

Quote

 

https://mfcallahan.blog/2018/07/29/the-history-behind-462-675-mhz-and-the-travel-tone/

nsea.com/nseainfo.htm

This link briefly discusses how the “travel tone” of 141.3 Hz and the national calling/emergency frequency of 462.675 MHz came to be. NSEA was one of the very first adopters of GMRS in the early 1970s, then the Class “A” Citizens Band. Here’s a quick snippet from the link

 


 

Quote

 

https://offroadpassport.com/forums/topic/5775-gmrs-for-beginners/

The Travel Tone - It’s also worth noting that there is a “national travel tone”. This is on CTCSS 141.3 Hz. The idea here is that “most” repeaters will accept the travel tone and allow you to broadcast for travel or assistance related transmissions. This is pretty nice, since you don’t need to know a ton of specific tones for specific repeaters for specific needs. This is reminiscent of Channel 14 on CB, which was a largely accepted “travel channel”.

 

 

Quote

 

https://www.chemeurope.com/en/encyclopedia/General_Mobile_Radio_Service.html

"675" 462.675 Nationwide emergency and road information calling. Nationally recognized coded squelch for 675 emergency repeater operation is 141.3 Hz.

 

 

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This topic, by its vary nature, is subjective and subject to debate.

And at the end of the day, some have shown history, some have shown flexibility and some have shown their intent to be inflexible irrespective of past precedent.

And that's why Heinz makes 57 Varities! 😀

This is likely to be my last comment in this thread...

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11 hours ago, DownEastNC said:

A simple Google search; "GMRS Travel Channel". I quoted the results in order that had anything to say about a "Travel Channel". I did not cherry pick the results. There were over 10 pages of results but for random samplings sake I just grabbed the first handful. Not one mentioned anything about an alternate travel channel. Every single one specifically mentioned Channel 20(462.675MHz) and most went on to say "with a PL of 141.3Hz"

@DanW I'm an open minded person. Please explain why everyone should jump convention and a set precedent because you think Channel 19 is "easier" ? Here's one even better, try going to some other GMRS forums and make the pitch for channel 19 being the "new" travel channel. I'm willing to wager that you will be informed of the past precedent of Channel 20. From my chair this looks like a done deal and common knowledge that 462.675 is the travelers channel. Does anyone disagree?
 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

Quote frenzy aside, it is easier because GMRS is FAST growing.  More radios are on the market than ever, and about 99% of users don't read this forum or get into these HAM-lite discussions.  Many, if not most, are gravitating over from CB.  (Probably the fastest growing segement of the market is the off-roading community.)  They do, however, travel on highways to and from their favorite destinations.  They know that on their old CB's, many of which still keep in their vehicles even after aquiring GMRS radios, channel 19 has been the travel channel for decades, approaching 1/2 century.  Pop culture taught them that, as well as the days when there was high usage.  Even today, while CB 19 is much quieter than it used to be, you can still hear many conversations there and easily get info from truckers who continue to monitor it.  So having channel 19 as the travel channel makes for an easy transition and it is likely the first place new GMRS users will check.  

Say what you want about 20.  I NEVER hear travelers using simplex 20 as the travel channel.  I can get on I70 right now and start talking away and there's a 99% chance NOBODY will respond.  At the same time, I can easily get someone on CB 19 to respond, pretty much every time, on any interstate with even light traffic on it.

Interestingly enough, @OffRoaderX awhile back single handedly declared channel 16 to be the off-road channel.  (Why?  4x4=16).  On my last off-road trip to Turkey Bay ORV area in Kentucky what did I hear? Nothing on channel 20.  Also at the Easter Jeep Safari in Moab last year, channel 16 was easily the most active.  The only place I've heard traffic on channel 20 was Moab, because so many were on 16 that people decided to find other channels.  So he's done a great job of introducing off-roaders (again, the fastest growing group of GMRS users) to channel 16.  

Like the early 21st Century, when the porn industry drove the hoardes to Blue Ray and away from HD DVD, the off-road community may send 'em flying to channel 19, if they so decide. 😉  And they'll go there because it is already ingrained in their minds. They won't burn a calorie trying to think about it.

I just think it would be easier and logical to get 19 up to speed than channel 20.  But if everyone gravitates to 20, I'm fine with it and will use it.  But good luck with that.  If its been around as long as you say, whatever effort was made to promote it has left little to show for it.

 

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