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when to use call sign?


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#1 xShadowx

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Posted 19 October 2015 - 09:14 PM

Just getting started in GMRS. Trying to figure out proper etiquette for callsign use. Based on this, it is my interpretation that, I can turn my radio on and use a frequency on an outing, say taking a hike at the park, and when I am done use my callsign and turn it off. Or if for some strange reason I am talking for more than 15 minutes (not likely) I would need to use my callsign. Is this correct.

 

Also this is the bare minimum, what is normally done? What I have been doing is getting on, broadcasting my callsign and asking if anyone else is on the frequency (so far nobody) and then using it until I am done, then broadcasting mt callsign and saying I am going off the air.

 

ยง95.119   Station identification.

(a) Except as provided in paragraph (e), every GMRS station must transmit a station identification:

(1) Following the transmission of communications or a series of communications; and

(2) Every 15 minutes during a long transmission.

( B) The station identification is the call sign assigned to the GMRS station or system.

© A unit number may be included after the call sign in the identification.

(d) The station identification must be transmitted in:

(1) Voice in the English language; or

(2) International Morse code telegraphy.

(e) A station need not identify its transmissions if it automatically retransmits communications from another station which are properly identified.

[48 FR 35237, Aug. 3, 1983, as amended at 63 FR 68975, Dec. 14, 1998]



#2 PastorGary

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Posted 20 October 2015 - 05:20 AM

If you follow the statement in your first paragraph above, you will be in compliance.  Not sure what type of equipment you are using, but if you are using 2 to 4 watt portables simplex, not many persons will hear you anyway...


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#3 xShadowx

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Posted 20 October 2015 - 01:58 PM

Running a portable simplex, stated power is 5W, but the declared power on the FCC site is 5.33w so I am assuming its less than 5 due to loss in the antenna. I am also in a large city of about 852 thousand people.



#4 Logan5

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Posted 20 October 2015 - 03:11 PM

you should always identify yourself by stating your call sign. This is especially important when given permission to use someone's repeater. I have a few guest that do not and it bug's me, I try not to pay attention to it.


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#5 matthauge

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Posted 27 November 2015 - 03:34 AM

I'm kinda late jumping in to the thread but a ye' ol' Elmer of mine said that if you have any questions on call signs and etiquette just do as the HAM's do. Amateur Radio is a bit more intensive on etiquette but he sees GMRS as an intro to Amateur Radio. Getting used to HAM habits is a step in the right direction.


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#6 edburke738

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Posted 30 November 2015 - 08:49 PM

Based on this, it is my interpretation that, I can turn my radio on and use a frequency on an outing, say taking a hike at the park, and when I am done use my callsign and turn it off. Or if for some strange reason I am talking for more than 15 minutes (not likely) I would need to use my callsign. Is this correct.

 

Obviously, interpretation is a very subjective thing.  My repeater is set to send a CWID every 15 minutes.  This happens whether or not there is activity. The safest interpretation would be to give your callsign at the end of the first transmission, and at the end of your last transmission.  If the transmissions are spread over a longer period of time, I would give it again at the end of every transmission that approximates a 15 minute period.  You don't have to be transmitting for 15 minutes, just operating over that period with multiple transmissions for the rule to apply.



#7 edburke738

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Posted 30 November 2015 - 08:55 PM

 but he sees GMRS as an intro to Amateur Radio. Getting used to HAM habits is a step in the right direction.

 

 

GMRS is looked down upon by many HAM operators as a less worthy service since there is no test involved.  As a result, there are many licensed GMRS operators who might have a hard time with the assumption they are using it as an intro to amateur radio.  For me, GMRS was my intro to two-way radios and resulted in my expansion into commercial radio, owning my own shop from 1989-1995.  To this day, my activities are much more on the commercial side than the amateur side-I originally got my HAM ticket so I could use a scanner in the car in Michigan (laws at the time forbid it with very narrow exemptions, of which HAM operators was one.)



#8 jwilkers

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Posted 06 December 2015 - 02:50 PM

GMRS is looked down upon by many HAM operators as a less worthy service since there is no test involved.  As a result, there are many licensed GMRS operators who might have a hard time with the assumption they are using it as an intro to amateur radio.  For me, GMRS was my intro to two-way radios and resulted in my expansion into commercial radio, owning my own shop from 1989-1995.  To this day, my activities are much more on the commercial side than the amateur side-I originally got my HAM ticket so I could use a scanner in the car in Michigan (laws at the time forbid it with very narrow exemptions, of which HAM operators was one.)

 

They are different services with different purposes.  I hold both licenses and get that.  That's why I have TWO licenses :)  Some people don't.



#9 n4gix

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Posted 07 December 2015 - 08:37 PM

That is precisely why I have both ham and GMRS licenses! :ph34r:






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