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Hint for emergency operations...


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#1 PastorGary

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Posted 09 September 2013 - 08:05 PM

A colleague mentioned something recently that was quite interesting - to be utilized in the event of an emergency.

 

If a person has a radio that is usually used with a GMRS repeater and the repeater goes down during bad weather or a natural disaster, how would that person be able to use that radio in an emergency if it is only programmed for the repeater?

 

The repeater owner or a designated alternate could have a MOBILE radio programmed just like the repeater, so it could be used to receive a repeater-only mobile.

 

The pseudo-repeater mobile radio would be programmed to receive on the 467 frequency and transmit on the 462 frequency.  That way, the person who would be attempting to hit the repeater that failed, would still be able to communicate with someone in an emergency.
 

Has anyone done this in your own applications?  [ This would probably fall under 47CFR95.143 ]  .


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#2 Guest_spd641_*

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Posted 10 September 2013 - 02:32 AM

P-G,

In the amateur world we call it going to reverse and most amateur radios have a button just to do that,even the Wouxun mobile...William


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#3 PastorGary

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Posted 10 September 2013 - 07:47 AM

Thanks, William - Valuable info.

 

For those persons who do not have the luxury of a single button to select reverse, it might be prudent to have reverse GMRS repeaters programmed into your commercial mobiles and portables for your most popular local systems just in case a repeater goes down and someone needs assistance - who would normally use the repeater.


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#4 Logan5

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Posted 10 September 2013 - 08:48 AM

since I am the repeater operator, I have a channel programmed in my radio that is reverse set. If for some reason the repeater goes down, I switch my radio to reverse and listen to 467 and transmit on 462.  at that point you could inform the other users that a simplex mode will be optimal until the repeater is back, My radio with dual VFO and dual watch, gives me the ability to run simplex and reverse at the same time. 


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#5 JeremyM

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Posted 10 September 2013 - 08:50 AM

In my experience with a whopping 3 different brands (Wouxun, Baofeng, and Yaesu), all of these have a reverse setting. One person works in normal mode and the other in reverse. This allows for "simplex" operations with offsets. This is commonly done in the GMRS world as well when 2 parties do not want their conversation easily monitored.


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#6 JeremyM

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Posted 10 September 2013 - 08:51 AM

And it looks like Logan beat me to it.


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#7 Unit 460

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 11:44 PM

A colleague mentioned something recently that was quite interesting - to be utilized in the event of an emergency.

 

If a person has a radio that is usually used with a GMRS repeater and the repeater goes down during bad weather or a natural disaster, how would that person be able to use that radio in an emergency if it is only programmed for the repeater?

 

The repeater owner or a designated alternate could have a MOBILE radio programmed just like the repeater, so it could be used to receive a repeater-only mobile.

 

The pseudo-repeater mobile radio would be programmed to receive on the 467 frequency and transmit on the 462 frequency.  That way, the person who would be attempting to hit the repeater that failed, would still be able to communicate with someone in an emergency.
 

Has anyone done this in your own applications?  [ This would probably fall under 47CFR95.143 ]  .

If someone were to do this they would have to follow the rules for what the FCC considers to be a large base station or fixed station. If I can I will find more information on this later and post it here.


 
 

 


#8 Logan5

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Posted 26 January 2014 - 06:11 PM

If someone were to do this they would have to follow the rules for what the FCC considers to be a large base station or fixed station. If I can I will find more information on this later and post it here.

With on going construction, renovating my new home. Our FTL600 repeater get's unplugged regularly. I have a channel programed reverse into my HT that can be used to communicate with other users at close range. I do believe a Mobile unit set up similar could be operated in place of the repeater as a relay. effective range would be dependent on that site's particulars. and only useful when and if the base is maned. fixed base station allows up to TX50 watts.



#9 mcp1810

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 06:51 PM

Some commercial radios (Motorola Saber, and Spectra) have at "Talk around" option that can be programmed.  On the Spectra (mobile unit) it is normally activated by pushing a button (DIR) on the front panel.  On my Saber I have the Top Mounted Selector Switch designated to select repeater in what otherwise would be the "Secure" mode and talk around (simplex) in what would be the "open" mode.

 

When in talk around the unit transmits on that channels designated receive frequency and still uses the designated tone code.






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