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  1. mbrun

    Using repeaters

    That is called “desense”. The radio that is transmitting, although transmitting on a different frequency, is actually desensitizing the receiving radio thus rendering it incapable of extracting the desired signal. It is the same effect you and your eyes suffer when you look in the direction of a bright light. Suddenly your eyes cannot make out the detail of the less bright items around you until the bright light is gone. The better the receiver design is within the radio the less it is affected by this. As Skyline said, put some space between the radios so the off-frequency transmitting radio is “less bright” to your receiving radio. Michael WRHS965 KE8PLM
    7 points
  2. kb2ztx

    APRS

    GMRS is not ham radio. If you want to use APRS get your ham ticket and enjoy. I for one dont want to listen to data burst all over the GMRS band. We only have limited channels to use now. Adding more to those doesn't help.
    5 points
  3. I received my new amateur call sign yesterday. I was able to get my dad's call sign, WB9VLW. The photo is one of his old tags.
    5 points
  4. Hello all! I am a couple years late to posting this topic, but mostly because this discussion created such heated arguments on Facebook that I either left or was banned from certain communities. At the time I was working as a state frequency coordinator and LMR engineer, now working with "one of the big LMR brands". As a result, I had and still have access to discuss issues with the FCC Enforcement Bureau and their in-house counsel. This is a rundown of said conversation I had after the last rule changes... Specifically towards the Part 90/95 issue - I asked why in the new rules it loosely stated that Part 90 equipment was permitted, but then later in the same rules mentioned it was not permitted. The in-house counsel agreed the wording was ambiguous at best, which would result in a hard time in them enforcing the rule on its own. Essentially, the conversation was "If you are caught with a Part 90 radio in the process of us investigating an issue such as malicious interference, it will be an added charge... but we cannot and will not pursue it on its own". The wording specifically I mentioned was: 95.335 (a) - Which states that non-Part 95 equipment may be operated in the service if they are certified for use in land mobile radio services. With that said, the Enforcement Bureau and their legal counsel agreed that the wording was added because of a distinct lack of Part 95 licensed equipment being added to the list, but that the wording wasn't fully clarified to explicitly permit it either. The resolution to the issue is what I quoted above... that they will not be pursuing certification violations by end-users, and the end user will not be caught and fined unless it was within the investigation into other issues which will usually be your worse issue regardless. The biggest hurdle this presented was for manufacturers to comply with certification of devices, and the wording was created to make sure Baofeng and others would not market their radios as GMRS radios without proper certification. So in the end - enjoy your Motorola XTS/APX/XPR radios, your Harris P7100/7200/etc radios, and so-forth. Just be wise and safe! What I hope to accomplish by posting this here is a CIVIL and PRODUCTIVE discussion to petition the FCC for a clarification into the rules where 95.335 can be either refined or referred to elsewhere in the Part 95 rules to be the "one rule to rule them all" and state that if a radio is Part 90 compliant, it will be permitted. The end.
    4 points
  5. Ham transceivers are not certified by most definitions - Part 97 doesn't hold a technical certification standard for equipment. The Amateur Radio motto is just "operate as efficiently as possible within these guidelines". Part 90 (and others like 87 and 80, etc) have specific requirements for emissions standards which can be quantitatively measured and analyzed. Which is why its easy to be said Part 90 is allowed - but not expressly worded within the current rules.
    4 points
  6. I have one of these operating up on a remote mountain side here in Alaska. It uses a SLA battery that is solar re-charged. I get a range of around 25 miles or so when coupled with handhelds such as Vertex VX-231s and/or Motorola PR400s. It probably can go further but I run into the inlet and can't test it further. Out at 25 miles it starts to get a bit noisy in the signal but the message is readable. I attached a photo of looking in out from where it's located at.
    4 points
  7. RIPPER238 I just can't understand some of the jerky response... Hey I got a new radio and want to see it it works... give us a break.. I'm sure these jerks did a radio check on there first radios... grow up and be professional and encourage others into GMRS... Jack
    4 points
  8. mbrun

    Duty Cycle Explained

    Coming from the perspective of a radio listener, I think 1 min is a good value as well as a serves as a reminder to keep one’s transmissions short and keep the dialog moving. However, as the talker, I admit I have personally settled on 2 min. One just proved to be to short and restrictive in way to many cases. While the TOT is a great way aid in keeping the duty cycle down, I like the security it provides knowing that if the PTT gets stuck unknowingly and accidentally that the radio will stop transmitting automatically after the TOT time has expired. Michael WRHS965 KE8PLM
    4 points
  9. MacJack

    APRS

    I agree that GMRS is a different breed and Ham channels offer a better solutions for those into APRS. Let's face it "how many folks cares about doing APRS in GMRS" just get a ham radio license, it is not that hard... Me and my 12 yo grand daughter just got our Ham ticket this month. Loving our local club and social connection to learn from older guys playing with APRS and all the other stuff like connecting with ISS.
    3 points
  10. axorlov

    APRS

    As a regular user of APRS on Ham band I have to chime in. The point of limited channels is very valid. Where I live, apparently some people already using GMRS/FRS channel for data telemetry. It's only mildly annoying now, but should everyone start using APRS (or other data) it's going to be detrimental to voice operations. APRS depends on a network of digipeaters, to be reliable and useful. I do not see it's to happen to GMRS ever in my lifetime. The new reserved data channel for FRS/GMRS? Yes!!! Where do I sign up. It could be one of the low power 467.xxx MHz channels or it could be a whole new 12KHz channel dedicated by FCC. Fat chance...
    3 points
  11. Coverage maps are hard because GMRS is a line-of-sight communications service. There will be spots where you can be less than 5 miles away from a hilltop repeater and not be able to open its squelch, and there are spots where you're scratchy into a repeater that's 100 miles away. Coverage maps can be very reliable tools if both the mobile station and repeater's powers, losses, and thresholds are properly entered; the correct antenna patterns and heights are used; proper statistical losses are taken into account; and an effort is taken to ensure the topography in the mapping software matches real topography. In my experience, none or very few of these tasks are done when generating a coverage map. Real coverage tends to be much less than the modeled coverage, typically because statistical loss has a huge effect (mobile coverage requires staying above the signal threshold more than n% of the time (I usually model at 70% or 87% depending on band), while spot coverage (often used by default) assumes you're standing still in the peak of a fluttery signal), your antenna (especially if portable) probably has less net gain than whatever mobile station the map-maker simulated coverage with, site noise is a very real thing that will reduce repeater sensitivity, repeater owners may not realize that they are using a directional antenna or tower mounting position, and not many repeater owners are willing to admit that it's possible to have 4 dB of loss between the transmitter and the antenna. Repeater owners and users also like to see good coverage come out of the simulations, regardless of actual coverage, so there's even incentive for misleading coverage maps. So, there's a lot of ways to alter the coverage depicted on a coverage map, and there's so much room for variation (about 25 dB worth) that it's not possible to make repeater-to-repeater comparisons unless the same person made all the maps with correct information. And unfortunately, it isn't possible for MyGMRS to generate the coverage maps accurately, as there's a lot of room for variation with repeater hardware (dinky little solar power repeater running 5W into a counterfeit Nagoya antenna duct-taped to a chain-link fence, vs. someone running 50 watts into a solid duplexer with preamplified receive and a 10 dBd gain antenna) and repeater locations on the map are not always accurate for various reasons. So, we just generalize coverage into a circle around the repeater's map position. It's easier for a repeater owner to estimate how far their repeater can cover towards population centers than for the owner to generate coverage maps that are correctly parameterized. It's easier for MyGMRS to handle circular coverage patterns than the rasterized geo-referenced images outputted by coverage mapping software. Radio coverage in general should be taken with a heaping handful of salt due to the wide degrees of variability that are out there, and instead test your actual coverage with a second radio or a friend. And if you know or learn mapping software such as Radio Mobile, you can even make your own coverage maps for estimation if there's enough information about a repeater's location in its MyGMRS listing.
    3 points
  12. ya it was Rubicon's, I didn't expect a response that early and to my surprise it was there. Glad to be part of the Licensed group now, I just got my license 2 days ago.
    3 points
  13. WyoJoe

    Antenna height

    Here is a website where you can enter two points to see the path between them. It also allows you to make adjustments for elevation of the antenna. https://www.scadacore.com/tools/rf-path/rf-line-of-sight/ In my experience, the RF path for GMRS isn't purely line of sight. I have generally been able to get over or around small hills successfully, but not bigger hills. Your success in reaching the other side of town will largely depend upon how big the "dip" is on the other side of the high spot. If it dips down to 350 feet, you'll probably be fine, but if it dips back to 130 feet as it does on your side, probably not.
    3 points
  14. SkylinesSuck

    Using repeaters

    Move them father apart. Have somebody take one into the front yard and try.
    3 points
  15. Could always just sit and key up and key down with roger beep going off......I'm sure someone would speak up at some point.....;)
    3 points
  16. I am in complete support of the GMRS community. With that said, THIS IS NOT AMATEUR RADIO (HAM) !. Just to be perfectly clear, again, this is NOT amateur (HAM) radio and was/is not designed/created as such. Nowhere that I have read, is it my responsibility to promote, encourage or even support GMRS use whether it be for family, business, personal or at the hobby level of use. That would be better served in the Amateur (HAM) radio classification and it's something they do quite well. I support and commend the HAM's for the time, expense and dedication they have and continue to perform at. I whole heartedly support their mission. I also can't thank them enough for their OUTSTANDING work and support of the citizens, emergency services agencies, infrastructure, beit power, water, red cross and the list goes on, during major incidents such as hurricanes, wildland fires and other manmade and natural disasters. The amount of money, time, training and dedication these folks invest is unbelievable and GREATLY APPRECIATED !. My hat is off to each and every operator . However, again I say, this is NOT amateur (HAM) radio, was not created by the FCC as such and the rules governing its use do not reflect such, so why is it always compared to and "expected to be" just like the Amateur service. If you prefer the way repeaters are operated in the Amateur field, then by all means choose and use that spectrum. If GMRS is a better fit for your needs and expectations, please feel free to utilize GMRS. The same goes for the Business classification and the rest. Understand (which requires you to take the time to read) the intended purpose and acceptable use and practices of this spectrum and you'll save yourself and the rest of us the possible aggravation and possible heart ache, associated with potentially choosing the wrong classification. Your failure to do so should not result in me being expected to and receive ridicule if I don't, conform to "your vision or expectation" of GMRS. I placed my repeater in service to serve the needs of myself, my family, my friends and my team, all of whom are current GMRS license holders. As a courtesy, let me say that again, as a "courtesy", I decided to offer access to, with my prior permission, other local, licensed users, that felt they could benefit from the use of this repeater. Why limit access to permission only and local only ? This checks several boxes on my list. First, I want to verify that the person or persons using my repeater are in fact currently licensed, local, and have a specific need to support their request. Second, it's another tool in the quest to keep control over the type of use my repeater will be utilized for and as a responsible and liable repeater owner, this is one of many ways I attempt to accomplish this. Another reason is notifications, if I need to take the repeater off the air for any reason or there's a problem that all users should be aware of, I am able to make notification to ALL operators that I have granted permission to by a group email. Yes, I keep a current list of everyone permission has been granted to as well as all of those who have requested access but were denied along with the reason for denial. I have spent and continue to spend a substantial amount of money to place this system on and keep it on the air and while it is still not able to deliver an optimum coverage area, continue to explore the possibilities for improvement almost daily. As most are already aware, every time that repeater is keyed up, it's causing additional wear and shortening the life of the equipment. So, unless someone has an unlimited amount of disposable income available to them it would only make sense that a GMRS repeater owner could & would take steps to limit the amount of unnecessary wear to their system in an attempt to lesson the maintenance and inevitable replacement cost, attempt to limit the amount of down time and most of all ensure the system is operational when they need it. This is one of the reasons that I clearly state in my listing that THIS system is not a "social networking" system. I not only discourage but will revoke permission to someone who decides they're going to start a lengthy transmission on what they had for dinner last night or what they watched on television etc. as this not the intended use I want for my equipment and causes the repeater to be tied up unnecessarily while causing the most damage (over time) to any system. Both are issues I am attempting to avoid by clearly conveying my rules in advance and if you don't like my rules, there's nothing written anywhere that says you "MUST" use my repeater. There are other repeater frequencies you can choose (or if you wanted to be a less than neighborly user (a jerk) you could choose the same frequency) and if there are no other repeaters available in your area and you don't like my rules, you are more than welcome to purchase, install and maintain your very own system where you too can make up the rules for accessing and utilizing your repeater. Yet another reason why I state once again, know and understand the different types of licensing/spectrum available and choose accordingly. I hope everyone that does signs up for and use GMRS has a positive experience and if GMRS is right for you, would encourage you to pursue obtaining your license. Just make sure you are choosing the correct category/spectrum for your likes & needs first. Good luck to all, stay healthy, well, safe and happy. Respectfully submitted, John
    2 points
  17. Landshark

    New to GMRS

    Welcome, I am new to the GRMS world as well, just installed a KG-1000g in my Jeep and will be using a 905g as the handheld with the Jeep. Mine is 2019 JLUR
    2 points
  18. kb2ztx

    Roger beep settings

    Exactly. If I hear it on my repeaters I give a warning, after that go use someone else repeater.
    2 points
  19. Fair enough for simplex; but you have to remember that if you're using a repeater you don't own yourself you're actually actively using someone else's radio in addition to your own. This is why repeater owners may have their own rules and practices they want followed when using their hardware; sometimes these rules include not having roger beeps. Since on repeaters you have people monitoring for traffic from others and are often dependent on them for communications, aside from the fact that they tend to be watering holes for radio traffic - you are forcing other operators to listen to you. Simplex, not so much a problem because you can tune out and not miss anything as you mentioned.
    2 points
  20. MEHoffman169

    New Licensee

    Thank you. I just checked back last evening and was able to join up. My Wouxum KG-805g is set to arrive tomorrow and planning to add a mobile unit soon.
    2 points
  21. n4gix

    Grounding / Bonding

    Radials and bonded grounding are two unrelated concepts.
    2 points
  22. I have discovered Chick fil A in my town uses FRS handhelds with their drive thru coordination. I have been sitting in line before listening to them say who goes where. Might try giving myself a shortcut and a free frosted coffee next time 😆
    2 points
  23. By ‘monitor option’ are you referring to the ability to manually open squelch and monitor the frequency regardless of tone settings? If so, the radio does have that. The small button on the mic, located below the PTT button, does just that. Regarding SWR, SWR values change based on the frequency used for the test. Based on the tuning of the specific antenna, the best SWR reading may be obtained higher or lower in its operational range. A key point however is that SWR has zero to do with the radio being used and everything to do with the antenna system (coax/feed-line and antenna). So if you are using an inline SWR meter (the typical type) between radio and your antenna system, the SWR should not change whether you are using a $50 radio or $1000 radio so long as both of them are outputing the same frequency for the test. In repeater mode your radio is transmitting on 467.xxxx frequencies. In simplex mode your radio is transmitting on 462.xxxx frequencies. If you have better SWR on the simplex channels then your antenna is better tuned to those frequencies. Michael WRHS965 KE8PLM
    2 points
  24. This site has a lot of info on repeater building. There are specific pages for different manufacturers. You might find something here. http://www.repeater-builder.com/rbtip/mojoindex.html
    2 points
  25. widnerkj

    Vehicle install

    Well, everything is here except the antenna from antenna farm. And I'm going to wait for that to show up before I go hog a hole out in the roof of the truck. Impatience leads to sloppy installs. That said, I seriously can't say enough good things about the antenna farm. I ordered while working overnight using my work computer, so the companies IP address (which shows as somewhere in VA). And while driving home after getting off shift at 7:30am, I received a phone call from them. He was concerned about the IP being from VA, but the shipping being out to AZ, and wanted to make sure there wasn't fraud. I explained that's work's IP, and everything is good. What a pleasant surprise. I'll be ordering everything from him from now on to be sure.
    2 points
  26. I would respond to a radio check. There just aren’t many GMRS users yet in my area. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    2 points
  27. kb2ztx

    Vehicle install

    a UHF 1/4 wave is 6". Not sure why you say they are all over 7". Not in UHF. As for the phantom think of that as a rubber duck jammed inside a pepper shaker. If you have local repeaters that are good it will work ok but are junk for any distance.
    2 points
  28. kb2ztx

    gmrs in ny

    Define upstate. Very little use in the Syracuse CNY area. When working in NY I rarely came across anyone while traveling.
    2 points
  29. Just an update that the switching converter is working great with a bench supply on my desk so far, and I am slowly getting everything pieced together. Thanks for the Samlex recommendation @mbrun! ocm
    2 points
  30. If you are currently operating one of these technologies (or other digital) in GMRS repeater operation under a special FCC license please contact me offline. We are trying to determine how many are out there now and where. intermod@sngf.org Northern California GMRS Users Group (NCGUG)
    2 points
  31. Mostly going to be ham stores. Best bet hro, ham radio outlet. It's a franchise so chances a location close by. Many of 70cm 440mHz properties are close to GMRS. There is always us here to try and steer the train wreck. Sent from my SM-G975U using Tapatalk
    2 points
  32. Every bit helps, but not significantly. Let me help by giving you a very, very crude illustration. A 5 watt radio provides 37dBm output. A typically radio has a receive sensitivity of -120dBm (the lowest level the radio needs to produce usable audio). That is 157dBm of difference. Now, imagine all 157dBm is lost in only 1 mile due to all the obstructions in the path, for an average of 1 dB loss per 33 ft. So now lets say you increase your radio power from 5 to 50 watts. That is an increase of 10dBm (37 to 47dBm). Ok, so now that you have increased your power 10 fold. How much further will you get if you assume the same linear average path poss of 1 dBm per 33 ft. You got it, 330’. So in this example, you increased your power by 10 fold yet your effective distance increased only from 5280 to 5610’. Now, if you were not battling the losses from all the obstructions in the path and went into outer space that same 5 watts would get you 225 miles, and 50 watts would get you 700 miles. There, signal level will drop based purely on inverse square law. The point I am trying to illustrate here is that presence of attenuation of signal caused by obstacles in the signal path plays a significant role in how far your signal will and will not travel. It takes a lot of extra power to “burn” through the obstacles. Much better to raise the antenna to remove the obstacles from the path in the first place. I hope this helps a bit. Michael WRHS965 KE8PLM
    2 points
  33. I have fixed the issues with the license importing script. I never heard back from the FCC, so I had to put in a hack to pre-process the files looking for a certain case. WRMM237 and WRMN710 are both in the system now.
    2 points
  34. mbrun

    Wouxun KG-UV9G PRO or ???

    For legal Tx on GMRS and Rx for everything the KG-UV9G is currently the flag-ship of consumer GMRS + True-Dual Receive multi-band scanners. I own the KG-UV9P which is the identical radio without GMRS Tx capability and it performs quite well for its price in my semi-rural environment. At the same time, I dislike the fact that the screen is mostly unusable outdoors during daylight hours and it has features perhaps not relevant to most GMRS users. But we all end up buying what the manufacturers sell, even when it is less than what we ideally might want. There are surely going to be more radios that find themselves on the market as more and more individuals purchase product and the market of license users grows. Michael WRHS965 KE8PLM
    2 points
  35. Good day DR. Power does play a factor, but it plays a minor factor in practice. Higher power can “burn” through the woods, but only if you put out enough power to “burn” through them. An increase from 5-50 watts is no where near enough to do that. While in outer space you could measure the increase in distance this extra 10dB would get you, on earth you have variable obstacles, terrain, curvature of the earth and variable RF noise conditions to contend with. All of these obstacles quickly chip away at what little power you have to give. This phenomena is truly why want you antenna a high as practically possible when long-range local communications is desired. The higher it is, the less obstacles the signal has to go through or around, thus the stronger the resulting signal will be at a given distance. Case in point. I can achieve achieve .6 miles reliable communication HT to HT in my heavily wooded area (level terrain) and unreliable communication out to 1.4 miles. Yet, using the same HT with same power I can open repeater 50 miles away when I stand in my front yard. What’s the difference? 1) The repeater antenna is perhaps 500-1000 foot higher in elevation than me. 2) There are no hills between me and the repeater to block my signal from reaching it. 3) There are no trees of consequence for the first 1-1/2 miles from my house in the exact direction of the repeater and 4) The performance of the repeater receiver is first rate. Hope this helps answer your question a bit. Michael WRHS965 KE8PLM
    2 points
  36. mbrun

    Wouxun KG-UV9G PRO or ???

    I own the KG-1000G, but I use it as a base within my home. I use HT’s in the car along with external antenna and speaker mic. If I were going to do an official install in the car, I would currently go with another 1000G. It is IMO the mobile equivalent of the UV9G. It does not do commercial FM like the 9G does, but that IMO is not needed since nearly every car on the road already has that. While the 9G does have multi-band Rx capably, my 1000G is programmed exclusively for GMRS, and it handles it quite well in my environment. I do not use it to scan anything except GMRS, but admit on occasion I tune in NOAA, or enter a specific local amateur frequency I want to monitor. I agree with WyoJoe, best is subjective. What is best for you may not be best for me and vice versa. IMO Midland radios may be best when it comes to operational simplicity for GMRS. The 1000G may be best in terms of programability options. Commercial radios may be best from an RF performance and reliability standpoint. Food for thought. Michael WRHS965 KE8PLM
    2 points
  37. For NMO hole saws the Laird or Ripley is what you want. The Ripley is actually what Motorola sells. For crimpers get a decent set. In the end they will last years. I got mine from Tessco almost 20 years ago and all three sets are still going. I know DX and other places have decent ratchet crimpers for 1 or 2 here and there but if your doing more than 1 a week spend the money. Also double check the dies that come with it and has the right ones for connector you are using.
    2 points
  38. Okay, I’ll bite here. I own a repeater (Rugged 575) in Naperville, IL at 250’. It’s on a commercial site with other UHF and VHF radio systems as well. Not only have I spent nearly 5 figures setting this up correctly but I monitor it as if it was my baby, cuz, you know, it *IS* my baby. I built it with no financial help from anyone else. Of course there was other help I received by LOTS of other commercial repeater owners (Those of you that are reading know who you are) as I’ve come a long way in the last year and some change here. I have my repeater system set up for several different private family usage cases and I also have a tone for public which I closely monitor as well and others that are out there do use it. As a repeater owner I’m super happy to turn my radio on and hear other people using it. As a matter of fact just yesterday some other licensed GMRS users were using my repeater and I needed to use it with my wife as I was at the grocery store and I broke in and said, “hang tight guys, I need to talk to my wife for a minute. I’ll let you know when I’m done”. Anyways, I flipped to our tone, talked with her about the particulars, then went back to the public side and said “Carry on guys! Glad to hear you out there using the machine”. That being said, mine is set to “Ask permission” as well because as others have mentioned, I want to know who is using it to verify their license and location because it’s my system and it’s my responsibility to make sure it’s up to par on the commercial shared site. I have sent an email back to EVERY! SINGLE! PERSON! As well welcoming them with the tones to use it! I haven’t had the need (yet) to ever reject anyone from using my repeater but I still keep a tab on who has access to it as in my opinion, it’s my responsibility to do so. Not only that, but I have my custom verbiage I send back with every request as well stating that this is a family repeater as well and to aid to traffic on the other PL tone. Heck, I’ll paste what I send you can see where we are coming from with this: “The tone for my repeater is XXXX (left blank) (N – normal, not inverted). When you key up for the first time please identify yourself using your call sign and call for ROB. I am regulating who is using my repeater as it is being used for my family as well. I have received an exceeding amount of requests to use my repeater. Originally this was set up for family only use but seeing as the range is far better than expected, I have opened it up on an as-requested basis to any licensed GMRS operator. PLEASE NOTE: ALL TRAFFIC MUST YIELD TO MY FAMILY. The tone for public use is different than family so if you see your radio lighting up receiving on 462.575 but no audio is coming through on your radio it's because my family is talking so please do not key up until that traffic has cleared. Thanks and I hope to hear you on the air!” That being said, sometimes users don’t understand what a multi-table is either so I will say this too: When you first use a new repeater you should ALWAYS call out for a radio check IMO because you don’t know how that repeater is set up and should NEVER assume anything! I was in Iowa once and I made contact to the owner on the traveler tone (I was travelling) and he told me that it’s linked to another repeater in California! NONE of this information was posted on mygmrs.com and upon googling I couldn’t even find it either!!! It was good to know that I was keying multiple machines too and me and the owner had a nice long 30 minute conversation and he was glad I keyed up and shouted out! To sum up further as a repeater owner: *MOST*, but not *ALL* repeater owners don’t mind you using their machine I’ve found. Now I’m in the Midwest mind you, so again, no assumptions would be made for other machines that I’ve never used, but around here most repeater owners are very happy to have you on their machine and it brings a great smile to their face to know that they are serving the public with a reliable communication system and growing the hobby as well! Remember that GMRS isn’t HAM and HAM isn’t GMRS. A *LOT* of people out there want GMRS for family use under one license and that’s what I’m doing but I’ve decided to open it up to the public as well as the coverage is fairly decent. I looked at getting a business license and could have easily done it too but I like the idea of being able to chat with my family *AND* other GMRS users so here we are! Thanks!
    2 points
  39. At the risk of sounding arrogant. I've said this before and will re post it again
    2 points
  40. n4gix

    Ranking?

    I have made 777 posts since I joined back in 2015, but an still Ranked as a "Newbie?" Sheesh!🤪
    1 point
  41. I keep my Roger Beep on - when someone complains about it, I remind them that its my radio and nobody is forcing them to listen to me.
    1 point
  42. Michael, One minor correction: while the prior models did not support split tones, Midland appears to have updated the current mxt115 and 275 with split tone capabilities (and a usb-c port). https://midlandusa.com/product/mxt115-micromobile-2-way-radio/ Edited to add: i'm tempted to grab one to have a free radio to throw in the better half's car. Talking her into a decent antenna is hard part so I might just go with the one it comes with to start with.
    1 point
  43. widnerkj

    Vehicle install

    That could be another thread all together. I did a lot of research into the native android head units, and on the xda developers forums, the ATOTO A6 pro got the best reviews and recommendations. I’ve only used this in several installs now. And I’ll keep with the recommendation on it. There are front, rear, and subwoofer amplifier outputs, so if you need it loud, it’s very easy to get carried away. The internal amp is 30 watts RMS, so it’s more than enough to add volume and clarity to a factory speaker system. Sound quality specifically is absolutely improved over factory sound. The dual Bluetooth, WiFi, and GPS antennas make it seriously capable. Typically, I turn on my phones WiFi hotspot, and run pandora, Waze, google maps, etc... right on my dash. But having access to the google play store, I run an app called Torque pro ($5) that talks to a $12 Bluetooth OBDII adapter, and allows me to generate custom gauges on things the vehicles computer sees. Also scan, and clear check engine lights. I’ve got a dash cam, and a backup camera connected directly to it, and still have 3 available USB ports. I’m a little tempted to try a SWR app and usb dongle on it. But it has given my 1999 Chevrolet more modernization than anything else I could have done. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    1 point
  44. JeepCrawler98

    APRS

    I've looked into this in the past; I still believe it's technically legal on GMRS if you want to argue it. I took this up with the FCC and below is what I received back from them. I think there's grounds to argue against their response, but it settled the issue for me (for now) anyways. Justified or not, and while APRS as a protocol is allowed, their stance is that they don't want it unless limited to a certified low-power handheld radio with fixed antenna, which severely limits its application as it eliminates the ability to develop a solid digipeating/gateway infrastructure (which I had planned to start developing at the time on one of the 462 interstitial 'FRS' channels) My original request to them: Their response:
    1 point
  45. I second the part 90-95 clarification. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    1 point
  46. rdunajewski

    More RT97

    You do, but the insertion loss is caused by the fact that the "V" notch trough isn't the only factor. The insertion loss comes from what the filter is doing to the pass frequency, which on these small units is going to be much higher at a 5 MHz split than a 10 MHz split. So while you're filtering out 462.xxx MHz in the notch, you're also losing power on 467.xxx MHz due to the curve to the right. Basically you're too close to the notch, and you're losing some power there. This is also why the duplexers are marked with a high and low side, as the configuration of that curve to the left or right depends on which side you're on. Normally the insertion loss is small, like 1 to 1.5 dB on a good duplexer, but you don't have that low of curve to contend with in those cases. So to avoid this, you can either tune the V lower in frequency (which isn't great, as you're losing isolation) or you can try to make it a little shallower as long as you're still getting adequate isolation. Since it's a low power transmitter, you don't need -90 dB but the more isolation, of course, the better. It's just a balancing act to notch as much as you can without negatively impacting the frequency you want to pass. I had to retune the duplexers that came in an engineering sample I received of these repeaters, as they were tuned for 453 and 463 MHz. For one, I had to swap the high and low sides since they were set up with RX on 453 and TX and 463, which was an issue with the short SMA jumpers they included. Then, I had to retune the duplexers to the GMRS band and be careful to not impact the pass side too much. Keep in mind I'm no expert, my background is software not RF design or Electrical Engineering. I know just enough to be dangerous and convince myself I'm right most of the time. 🤓
    1 point
  47. I think it's worth a try. Keep us posted. I know the letter sequence in my call sign is clunky.
    1 point
  48. Quick example of line of site/elevation is king: I've been working a local contest that is metroparks on the air. Saturday I was at one parking lot that I thought was pretty high, elevation 971. I got one contact, report was that I was extremely scratchy at 50W, so I went to another parking lot, elevation 990, and picked up 4 contacts immediately. Inversely, I went to the next park, which happened to be in the valley right next to the Cuyahoga River, and managed a single contact that I know lives in the valley 5 miles away, but couldn't get a friend only 3 miles away at the top of the hill.
    1 point
  49. Good job of setup for software... This is a new post on BTWR website... https://www.buytwowayradios.com/blog/2021/05/how-to-install-the-programming-cable-and-software-for-the-kg-905g.html Has a good work around as well. Jack
    1 point
  50. You mean a coax-less nmo? If so soldering iron and its accoutrements. Crimper(if crimping), soldering tools if soldering and cutters for the so239 side. Sent from my SM-G975U using Tapatalk
    1 point
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