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The Baofeng UV5RE

HT Baofeng UV5RE Motorolla Uniden Midland VHF/UHF two way radio

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#21 PastorGary

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 04:29 PM

Thanks for the additional information and Welcome to the Forum. :)


PastorGary -

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#22 blastco2

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Posted 29 January 2014 - 04:17 PM

There is always good and bad with this type of thing. Back in the day, every radio had to be programmed or crystalled. You really couldn't buy a cheap radio and play on your own (in part 90/95).

But now these cheap radios that anyone can program, by keypad or free s/w are out there, and I have an UV5R too, I tinker with it. The issue is any ya-hoo can get one...and get on frequencies he is not allowed on. There is a have a guy locally running around asking for radio checks on the Sheriff's UHF, the VHF Fire, and a local company's wide area VHF....so I guess it's the good with the bad.

hello all! first post here. I mostly lerk but, would like to say thanks to all for this resource. I live in se Idaho and my favorite activity is snowmobiling in the surrounding mtns. back country off trail, boondocking as we call it. I've been a radio enthusiest for as long as I can remember. at this point me and my riding group use these radios to help us stay together in the mtns. the blister packs just don't cut it at .5w. from mtn top to mtn top the blisters will get out, way out. but that isn't what we need. our needs are more, up the canyon, through the trees and around the corners or, the canyon on the other side of the ridge. these radios work so much better than the blisters. while I'm on this subject, the garmin rino GPS/FRS/gmrs, thoroughly underwhelming! might as well save some $ and buy a blister.

anyway, I replied to this particular message because, I was perusing amazon, reading the reviews and comments, the radio ignorance is unbelievable. seems to be especially true concerning the bf888. comments like, I bought these for my grandsons and they really like them. also, from another, do you need a license for these? answered several times, "NO"! never any mention that these are not to be used with factory programing, or what a pain it can be to program the very first time.
I'm thinking that the FCC will get involved and start looking real close at these radios and their potential for abuse/misuse. all that needs to happen is for some sa kids to interfere with an emergency activity, making the situation/emergency worse, maybe even to the point of costing a life. when that happens, the FCC will come down like ugly on an ape.

one other thing, on the lighter side, my call sign, I got lucky, didn't chose it, just what uncle charlie issued. you can go to ruger.com and look it up.🔫

#23 blastco2

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Posted 29 January 2014 - 04:36 PM

oops, message got cut off or I just typed too much. anyway I'm registered here and my call is available to those who are also registered. I monitor .550 and .600 (cause thats where the licened locals are) if you happen to be passing through or live near by.

question for the group. why would someone put up a repeater, set it to id at seemingly random intervals and never ever use it? I've listened for years and never heard anything but the id?????? has good coverage too. probably 40-80 miles depending on terrain.
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#24 Logan5

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Posted 29 January 2014 - 07:15 PM

I also have a BF888 and I like it for GMRS, and repeater use. I am aware it is not Part95. It has a High/Low TX setting. 2/1 watt's This complies with GMRS rules, but not FRS's 1/2 watt limit, also FRS does not allow removable antenna. I find the 888 to be a nice 16 dollar radio. it is what is is, useful.



#25 blastco2

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Posted 29 January 2014 - 10:06 PM

I have a bf888, 4 uv3r's, 1 b5, 2 5r's. All good radios! So much better than the blisters. Now this is just my opinion... If a guy uses these on gmrs and is careful not to misbehave, there will never be a problem. However the radios that are listed on amazon and eBay ext, get sold to people that know nothing about freq/channel allocation or anything else rf related. These buyers are not even sure what the numbers are on their car stereo. That person is going to get in some big trouble. Not a matter of if, its when and how much. If you get some free time read some of the reviews and the Q&A's on the amazon listings for the bf888. I was surprised and a little dumbfounded. People are Buying these, especially the bf888, and using them as supplied. I wish baofeng would at least ship with the memory empty....

#26 lukeoid153

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Posted 19 July 2014 - 09:39 PM

I'm glad that you are all talking about this very topic. I am new to GMRS, got licensed for the family a couple months ago and just last week got my Ham Technicians license. As the rest of the family is not yet on board with alternative communication medium, I plan on getting the Baofeng bf888s for them and just simply program it for them to contact me via a GMRS repeater in our area.  As is mentioned above that these are FCC compliant, but not factory approved, I think that as they will be used in compliance with FCC usage rules. With that, what are options for GMRS that are repeater capable?  Any recommendations that might be factory approved and compliant?  Thanks so much.



#27 Linus

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Posted 21 July 2014 - 12:38 AM

I know that Motorola makes a FCC Certified radio. MRS350R is the model. The price is MUCH higher than a Baofeng radio, but it has the FCC sticker which is important.

 

GMRS repeaters will give you coverage similar to a 70 cm repeater. The wavelength is such that it will permit your signal to exit a building better. Dead spots are smaller (just move a little bit and you can get out of a dead spot). The distance that you can transmit is not as far as VHF. VHF can get go over the horizon a bit more than UHF.

The power output is limited to 50 watts for a GMRS repeater. You need permission to use GMRS repeaters (I would ask even if it is listed as an open repeater).

 

Your family would have access under your GMRS license. Depending on terrain, line of site is what you need to make the repeater.

 

Linus



#28 MSensei

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Posted 08 October 2014 - 09:49 PM

Ok, so it's been about a year since I picked up the Beofeng UV-5RE Plus and, honestly, I've only had sporadic amounts of time to do any testing with it - until a few weeks ago.  So thoughts:

 

1 - Physical Unit

So, I have dropped, kicked, scraped and have had a 2, now 3 year old grab it, run off with it and throw it - and it still works!  It's definately physically solid casing provides good protection.

Scale of 1 to 5 - it gets a 5 for durability.

 

2 - Programming

On a scale of 1 to 5 I give it a 3.

 

Pros - After you download the correct software/drivers, programming (downloading/uploading data) the device is fairly easy - if you get failures in either direction, it is usually because the unit itself has low battery power.  The software interface is fairly straightforward so long as you know what you are doing - there are no help files on what anything means.

 

Cons - Programming using the handset is not as easy - but that may be the case for many hand helds.  You can only program and/or update a channel from within Frequency mode - it cannot be done within channel mode. SOFTWARE - even though it is straight forward, every time you launch it, the language defaults to Chinese, so you have to know where to change it at for English (unless you know chinese) to utilize it.  Subsequently, the USB Cable needs to be plugged in with the unit turned on prior to launching the application, otherwise, the software goes into an endless loop which you are forced to reboot computer in order to get out of it.

 

3 - Operations (Transmit & Receive/Antenna)

So, the default antenna that comes with the unit is ok - I would say it is on-par or slightly better than the antennae that come with bubble-pack devices.  In fact, it works very well with bubble pack devices for transmission and reception.  To that point I purchased a Etekcity® Nagoya NA-771 SMA Female 2.15 dbi 10W Antenna for the radio - Noticible and significant difference in reception and transmission but was really only limited to testing it in my area - which can be a challenge given no real repeater availability and topography of the area - was able to transmit/receive with the bubble pack radios up to about 1 mile with my signal being stronger.

 

Recently, I picked up a Original Nagoya Dual Band SMA UV Antenna for baofeng UV-5R which is a vehicle-mount antenna (magnetic).  I can tell you I do get very good reception with the mounting, however, I am unclear if and/or how well transmissions are being received from my station, being mobile.  This has been a source of frustration with me to the point that I was just about to give up - I don't know if it is me, or if there is just no one listening at the time I am transmitting.  I travel the I-476 route from Lansdale to Philadelphia (up I-95 to PHL) - South in the morning between 7 and 8:30 AM and usually after 5 PM on the return home.  Today, I think someone may have heard me on a 725 repeater near PHL and was trying to contact/confirm my transmission, but I'm not sure (I was also moble, as I always am, trying to make the contact).  A little later in my trip, I picked up a station identification from repeater I believe to be in Holmes, PA from between Lansdale and Plymouth Meeting. 

 

Either way, the committee is out on how well this 4W/5W transmission is working.  Until I can get some solid time/confirmation with someone either on a repeater (preferred) or directly on a frequency, I can't provide a meaningful rating for this aspect of it.  If anyone is in the area of my daily travels and wants to volunteer to help out, please PM me.

 

 

So that is my review to date.  Hopefully, in the near future I can provide some sort of update on the operations (transmit/receive) while mobile.

 

Thanks,

David


-David


#29 Logan5

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Posted 09 October 2014 - 11:23 AM

I just got the Bf-F8 very similar to the UV5r line, even uses same battery. Not sure how I feel about the reverse display but it does have the latest chip and preforms very well.



#30 zap

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Posted 16 October 2014 - 12:52 PM

The Chinese radios really have changed the radio game. My apartment complex acquired a bunch of BF888's. I essentially help resale the UV5R's.

I generally program with Chirp unless I specifically need to remove the vfo. I've noticed several things with the radios.

A) Don't try and hot swap the programming cable or speaker/mic. Turn the radio off. I've seen many people blow either the ptt out speaker on the radio (usually works fine with a speaker Mic though).

B) the receivers are good, the squelch circuits suck. They can get a little annoying on high rf environments, even with a receive pl on.

C) I've found the stock UHF antenna on the bf-888 has 2-3 more dB of gain on the dual band antenna...and a Motorola Jedi series UHF antenna has 3 dB more gain than the "high gain" UHF antenna (same bandwidth). The Motorola antenna can be found on Amazon for $8.

D) if you trash one, you are out $15-30.
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Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: HT, Baofeng, UV5RE, Motorolla, Uniden, Midland, VHF/UHF, two way radio

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