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Baofeng UV-5r changing frequency limits?


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Hey,  I picked up a Baofeng UV-5r which I am using as a scanner. I noticed in the CHIRP software under settings/other settings that I can change the upper and lower VHF/UHF frequencies. I was hoping to be able to listen to 800mhz range frequencies as that is what our local law enforcement use. Basically, it is a work/not work issue or is is a kill the radio/just not like it scenario?

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The radio circuit components will only respond to a SLIGHT variance up and down within the same band. I am personally not familiar with any Baofeng radios, but as a retired electronics and communications engineer for 35+ years, don't bother even trying to up - band the UHF to 800. It just isn't going to happen.

 

If I remember correctly, the metro PD radio system in your area is P-25 digital, which a Baofeng will not receive anyway.

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And to add even more insult to injury, if they've enabled encryption. :)

But not to worry, the UV-5r will not tune the 800 MHz band in any case.

There are 800 MHz band capable portable receivers on the market, however. Personally, I use an Alinco DJ-X11K, but it's a straight up analog radio with no support for any digital modes and it doesn't trunk.

Regards,

Frank.

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For scanning purposes, buy a scanner.  The only purpose of buying a transceiver is to use it to communicate, which you cannot do without the proper licenses.

 

For scanning, I use 2 rtl-sdr dongles.  One for the control channel decoding and one for the voice decoding.  Using Unitrunker and DSD+ I can monitor analog and p25 digital systems with ease.  You can easily put together a scanning system that rivals these expensive scanners for well under $100, including outdoor antenna and coax.

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For scanning purposes, buy a scanner.  The only purpose of buying a transceiver is to use it to communicate, which you cannot do without the proper licenses.

 

For scanning, I use 2 rtl-sdr dongles.  One for the control channel decoding and one for the voice decoding.  Using Unitrunker and DSD+ I can monitor analog and p25 digital systems with ease.  You can easily put together a scanning system that rivals these expensive scanners for well under $100, including outdoor antenna and coax.

 

If not using trunking, could also get an analog scanner and add a discriminator tap with DSD or DSD plus.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

 

Ugh! More terms to learn and Google :)

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Ugh! More terms to learn and Google :)

 

Don't let it get you down.  There's a lot of things to learn when you're starting out in radio.  If you're looking to monitor a frequency, you need to know a few things about it.  1.  the frequency-this may be a single frequency (conventional), multiple conventional channels used for different needs or multiple channels used in a trunking system.  2.  Is it analog or digital?  If digital, what type?  P25, DMR, NXDN, iDAS, etc.  3. Is it "in the clear" or encrypted?  If encrypted, give up now.

 

Once you have those answers, the next question is; how am I going to listen?  If you're looking for a base to monitor one channel or system, the dongle suggestion above is probably your best bet as it can decode many of the digital modes as well as analog.  If you need a portable solution, you'll need to look at scanners with the frequency range and capabilities you require.  Uniden is scheduled to make an announcement tomorrow that many are speculating that they will have a firmware update that allows DMR decoding, but as of right now, the only digital mode scanners will receive is P25.  for any of the other modes, you would need to buy a portable radio capable of the mode. If it's a trunked system that's not P25, even a portable capable of working on the system won't work as it has to be authenticated onto the system by the administrator. 

 

I know it's a lot, but the more you learn, the easier it gets.

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I use my UV5R as a scanner and GMRS radio...but I can't hear much anymore. I am looking at a Uniden 325P2 so I can get back in the "know". I leave my UV5 at work, because it is cheap and if it came up missing I would not be out much. I usually use my M gear for real comms. Although I did recently pick up a NEW pair of Unidens (about 2006) model GMRS/FRS radios that had a scrambler in them. Nice little radios.

 

I have had a set of Audiovox for years, but these are really nice. I use them on vacation, etc. I wanted to try out the scrambled audio feature on the Unidens, even though those were discontinued right after they started selling them. They had FCC cert but then there was a misunderstanding between FCC and Uni about the scramble, and they lost the Cert. I like them, and will be looking to get another pair for reserve. 

 

So yeah...a purpose built radio is best. 

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I use my UV5R as a scanner and GMRS radio...but I can't hear much anymore. I am looking at a Uniden 325P2 so I can get back in the "know". I leave my UV5 at work, because it is cheap and if it came up missing I would not be out much. I usually use my M gear for real comms. Although I did recently pick up a NEW pair of Unidens (about 2006) model GMRS/FRS radios that had a scrambler in them. Nice little radios.

 

I have had a set of Audiovox for years, but these are really nice. I use them on vacation, etc. I wanted to try out the scrambled audio feature on the Unidens, even though those were discontinued right after they started selling them. They had FCC cert but then there was a misunderstanding between FCC and Uni about the scramble, and they lost the Cert. I like them, and will be looking to get another pair for reserve. 

 

So yeah...a purpose built radio is best. 

What is the model number on those Unidens?

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For scanning purposes, buy a scanner.  The only purpose of buying a transceiver is to use it to communicate, which you cannot do without the proper licenses.

 

 

 

Yes and no, I just picked up a UV-5R for short money on Craigslist.  While I played a bit on the ham frequencies, it is really a toy for me more than anything, until I took a long, hard look at it as an alternative to a Minitor VI.  I ordered a knockoff Diamond SRH805 and will use the radio to scan local PD/FD and fire buff networks.  It's less than 10 frequencies, so it's not an issue with the scan speed, and it takes up very little real estate on my belt.  TX on the buff networks I belong to will be there, and TX on the other channels will be disabled via Chirp.  All tolled, I'm in for under $30 for something that meets my needs that I was considering a $400 Minitor VI for.  I still have my other radios I can go to for my transmit needs (FT-60 for Ham, EX600, HT1550XLS for GMRS/Commercial) so it does have its uses as a scanner.

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Yes and no, I just picked up a UV-5R for short money on Craigslist.  While I played a bit on the ham frequencies, it is really a toy for me more than anything, until I took a long, hard look at it as an alternative to a Minitor VI.  I ordered a knockoff Diamond SRH805 and will use the radio to scan local PD/FD and fire buff networks.  It's less than 10 frequencies, so it's not an issue with the scan speed, and it takes up very little real estate on my belt.  TX on the buff networks I belong to will be there, and TX on the other channels will be disabled via Chirp.  All tolled, I'm in for under $30 for something that meets my needs that I was considering a $400 Minitor VI for.  I still have my other radios I can go to for my transmit needs (FT-60 for Ham, EX600, HT1550XLS for GMRS/Commercial) so it does have its uses as a scanner.

Only problem with that is that there are actually regulations in place that dictate that a two way radio can not be used as a primary to a pager. That is one of the reasons it took Motorola 20+ years to allow MDC and two-tone decoding on the same personality. Wasn't much of a point in it.

 

That being said, check out the Swissphone s.QUAD Voice. Small little guy, battery lasts about a week (or a month for the POCSAG model).

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Only problem with that is that there are actually regulations in place that dictate that a two way radio can not be used as a primary to a pager. That is one of the reasons it took Motorola 20+ years to allow MDC and two-tone decoding on the same personality. Wasn't much of a point in it.

 

That being said, check out the Swissphone s.QUAD Voice. Small little guy, battery lasts about a week (or a month for the POCSAG model).

 

But it is the other way around.  The Minitor was to be used to monitor all traffic, not paging.  It was the form factor of the Minitor that made it appealing.

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