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Motorola M1225-LS Repeater Question


Spudhut
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Hello all. 

 

Im new to GMRS but have been a HAM for a while. 

 

I have been lurking for a bit and taking in all the information I can on radios and building small repeaters.

 

I have a couple Motorola M1225-LS's (40w 2 channel) and want to build a repeater with them.  I understand the software is XP based (im looking into getting a machine with this), but my biggest concern are any issues that I may not be aware of while doing this.  Im buying a duplexer and all equipment to be able to adjust and tune in.

 

I know there are many folks that use the M1225's but not specifically the 'LS' units.  

 

Is there anything that I should be aware of before I start to chase this rabbit hole ie:  Hardware, repeater cable, specific versions to stay away from, etc.

 

Any links is greatly appreciated to other threads or websites.

 

Your help is greatly appreciated.

 

73

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I don't recall what programming for accessory pins the LS offers but that's the biggest issue you may have.

 

No need. The M1225 (and the LS versions) program just fine through the mic connector. They use the same programming cable as the Radius, MaxTrac, GM300, CDM and several other families of Motorola radios.

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I have a couple Motorola M1225-LS's (40w 2 channel) and want to build a repeater with them.  I understand the software is XP based (im looking into getting a machine with this), but my biggest concern are any issues that I may not be aware of while doing this.  Im buying a duplexer and all equipment to be able to adjust and tune in.

 

I know there are many folks that use the M1225's but not specifically the 'LS' units.  

 

Is there anything that I should be aware of before I start to chase this rabbit hole ie:  Hardware, repeater cable, specific versions to stay away from, etc.

 

Any links is greatly appreciated to other threads or websites.

 

Your help is greatly appreciated.

 

73

The M1225LS can be modified back to a standard M1225 by simply removing the aftermarket board that makes it a trunking radio. That will give you a 20 to 24 channel conventional radio.

 

And you won't need the LS version of the programming software. Find version 4.0, it runs just fine under XP. If you are acquiring an older PC for this, get one that has a real serial port. Then get a serial version of the programming cable. It will be much more reliable than trying to use a USB cable on the older PC and software. The serial cable use COM-1 so there's no dicking around with comport assignments. I bought a refurbed Panasonic ToughBook CF-29 with XP installed on Ebay. It is rock solid for the M1225 as well as my newer Professional Series and Commercial Series units. 

 

There is tons of information to be found about the M1225 (and LS) at batboard.batlabs.com, radioreference.com, and repeater-builder.com. You will probably find my posts and questions about this exact subject on the batboard and RR (user name is STeveC0625 over there.) I bought a 1225 not knowing it was an LS model. By searching at RR and the batboard, I found all the answers I needed and then some. I ultimately ended up selling the aftermarket board which reduced my purchase cost of the radio to almost zero.

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Programming being 'simple', any hardware issues or changes on making them repeaters?  I have my eyes on a repeater interface cable that i will be ordering.  From what I have been reading, this should be a simple task to pair them up.

Get one of the repeater cables from seller mre1032 on Ebay. He offers a couple of different versions that will suit your needs well. He's welll known in the Motorola community and highly reliable. In fact, check out some of his other offerings for the 1225 mobibles.

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The actual M1225 LS model was a distinct version of the radio. Just to make things confusing, there was also an LTR "add-on" option board that could be installed into a regular M1225 to make it into an LTR capable trunking radio. The M1225 LS had limited "conventional" modes- I believe it was only 2 conventional non-LTR channels, and I also believe the early models required you to power up on an LTR home channel. Later versions of software or firmware fixed that.

 

The most recent version Motorola M1225 programming software - HVN-9054  - will do either the conventional M1225 or LS models. Earlier versions of software was split into two different versions if I recall (20+ years ago) correctly.  Make sure you get the latest, and it won't be a problem. 

 

The M1225 LS radio probably has a duty cycle of 10 to 20% when run at 40 watts. It was never designed or suggested to be used as a repeater by Motorola. I'd set the thing to LOW Power and run a cooling fan on it the entire time that the repeater is on. The heat sinks on the M1225 series is not very big. Keep it supplied with fresh cool clean air.

 

Internal shielding was also not the greatest, and the M1225 series was known to suffer from desense. Get some physical separation between the transmit and receive radios, even if it's just 6 or 8 inches. Don't stack them directly on top of each other.  Also, those inexpensive repeater maker cables that plug into the back of a 16 pin option plug can go in either way. Make SURE you're plugging it with the correct orientation up/down. There's only one way that's correct, but the incorrect way will brick your radio.

 

https://www.repeater-builder.com/motorola/manuals/m1225-service-manual-6880904z96-a.pdf

 

Pages 54 & 55 have the pinout information.

 

If you didn't already own the radios, I'd be telling you to find another radio for the project.  I like M1225's - but I don't like them for repeaters that have any type of duty cycle. I've made a few "poor man repeaters" in my life, but I usually used the low power M1225 models for the transmit side, and set them down to 10 watts. With a fan. And a time out timer set at 60 or 90 seconds.

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No need. The M1225 (and the LS versions) program just fine through the mic connector. They use the same programming cable as the Radius, MaxTrac, GM300, CDM and several other families of Motorola radios.

 

Sorry steve I meant the programming of the 16 pin connector. I use the front programming cable. I know the 1225 let you change pin settings I just dnt remember if the LS version did. 

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Sorry steve I meant the programming of the 16 pin connector. I use the front programming cable. I know the 1225 let you change pin settings I just dnt remember if the LS version did.

I don’t believe there are any differences there. I didn’t see any when I first examined the radio. But it was a few years back.

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