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WRTY645


WRTY645
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12 hours ago, KAF6045 said:

Step shouldn't really be significant -- especially for GMRS primary channels which are 20kHz bandwidth inside a 25kHz channel spacing (.550, .575, .600, etc.). The interstitials are also on 25kHz spacing but, as the name implies, they are /between/overlap/ the primary channels. 12.5kHz step would apply if one is using a VFO for tuning, to be able to move from interstitial to primary to interstitial.

As mentioned, GMRS is authorized as 20kHz bandwidth (most rigs seem to use a 16kHz deviation). The 467MHz interstitials, which used be ONLY FRS, and are still limited to 0.5W are also limited to NFM (12.5kHz bandwidth -- most rigs use an 11kHz deviation max).

In fact, running a 12.5kHz bandwidth (NFM) will sound weaker/softer on a 20kHz (or 25kHz if the radio doesn't really have 20kHz filtering), since the maximum deviation is 75% (11kHz/16kHz) or less (11/20) of that allowed for GMRS primary channels.

If the radio has a microphone gain control (I don't think I've seen such in a GMRS rig) you could try increasing the gain; otherwise, perhaps you need to hold the microphone closer to your mouth (though I recommend just to the side -- to reduce the pops caused by "plosive" syllables)

 

FFS dude, know your audience.

What KAF60Blahblah meant to say, but never actually got around to saying is, make sure your radio is set to Wideband. 

I just said in one sentence what he was not able to accomplish in 4 paragraphs.. But on the bright side, he just gave me some great material for a new video...

 

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19 minutes ago, WRTY645 said:

New to gmrs and having trouble connecting to the repeater only a few miles from me. I'm using a wouxun kg 935g if that helps. 

I'm not 100% on the names the 935 uses, but it should differentiate between the simplex channels and the repeater channels (which have the proper offset baked in). From there, it's down to proper tx tone for the repeater, and basic range.

Where are you transmitting from, and what antenna are you using? If you're indoors (especially with radiant barrier insulation), or if there's significant obstructions like a big hill between you and the repeater, even a few miles could be challenging. Likewise, if the repeater is low level, maybe at rooftop height, that adds a whole lot more obstructions in a few miles.

If your settings are good (wouldn't hurt to give details, there's a number on here with the same radio), you may try from closer to the repeater's location and see if that works better.

Good luck!

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1 hour ago, KAF6045 said:

While the base list is the "30" FCC defined/consolidated channels, the 935 supports 999 "channels" in the memory. I left the core 30 alone for ad-hoc usage, and programmed all the (non-local, unfortunately) repeaters in the state into it (channels 31-42, sparse isn't it), including names for each, and 16 channels (113 - 128; chosen as some of my HTs also support up to 128 channels -- chirp finds 128 on the "60 channel" Retevis RA85) for the RT97 (each of the primaries appears twice, once with a semi-random CTCSS tone, and once with a semi-random DCS tone -- I feel that gives me field options to find a lightly used channel and some good chance that no one will accidentally match the tone in use).

My 805g has the base 30 (gmrs01-gmrs22, rept15-rept22), 4 of my local repeaters, and then another set of repeater channels for ad hoc use, plus a few local uhf things (public safety and ham stuff) for monitoring.

Where I was aiming with the channel names was making sure the offset was being used...that's where my mind goes first, offset, tones, then range.

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3 hours ago, wayoverthere said:

I'm not 100% on the names the 935 uses, but it should differentiate between the simplex channels and the repeater channels (which have the proper offset baked in). From there, it's down to proper tx tone for the repeater, and basic range.

Where are you transmitting from, and what antenna are you using? If you're indoors (especially with radiant barrier insulation), or if there's significant obstructions like a big hill between you and the repeater, even a few miles could be challenging. Likewise, if the repeater is low level, maybe at rooftop height, that adds a whole lot more obstructions in a few miles.

If your settings are good (wouldn't hurt to give details, there's a number on here with the same radio), you may try from closer to the repeater's location and see if that works better.

Good luck!

Thanks for some input on this I was able to get a radio check. But was told I'm hitting the repeater just fine but audio was a little difficult to hear and it was suggested to make sure my step is around 12.5 I believe (or something like that) I have yet to try again, since making that change. I may try again later when there is more traffic. 

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I think wideband might be the ticket.  I recognized your call and heard you come in on the Chain O Lakes repeater.  You were clear but very very quiet compared to the gentleman that came back to you.

 

I'm in front of my rig now if you want to call out and try it on wideband @WRTY645

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It really doesn't...

What are the contents of the channel programming? WHICH repeater (is it listed or findable under the "repeaters" tab at the top of the page). What is the estimated range of said repeater if it is listed...

 

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1 minute ago, wayoverthere said:

I'm not 100% on the names the 935 uses, but it should differentiate between the simplex channels and the repeater channels (which have the proper

While the base list is the "30" FCC defined/consolidated channels, the 935 supports 999 "channels" in the memory. I left the core 30 alone for ad-hoc usage, and programmed all the (non-local, unfortunately) repeaters in the state into it (channels 31-42, sparse isn't it), including names for each, and 16 channels (113 - 128; chosen as some of my HTs also support up to 128 channels -- chirp finds 128 on the "60 channel" Retevis RA85) for the RT97 (each of the primaries appears twice, once with a semi-random CTCSS tone, and once with a semi-random DCS tone -- I feel that gives me field options to find a lightly used channel and some good chance that no one will accidentally match the tone in use).

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1 hour ago, WRTY645 said:

Thanks for some input on this I was able to get a radio check. But was told I'm hitting the repeater just fine but audio was a little difficult to hear and it was suggested to make sure my step is around 12.5 I believe (or something like that) I have yet to try again, since making that change. I may try again later when there is more traffic. 

Step shouldn't really be significant -- especially for GMRS primary channels which are 20kHz bandwidth inside a 25kHz channel spacing (.550, .575, .600, etc.). The interstitials are also on 25kHz spacing but, as the name implies, they are /between/overlap/ the primary channels. 12.5kHz step would apply if one is using a VFO for tuning, to be able to move from interstitial to primary to interstitial.

As mentioned, GMRS is authorized as 20kHz bandwidth (most rigs seem to use a 16kHz deviation). The 467MHz interstitials, which used be ONLY FRS, and are still limited to 0.5W are also limited to NFM (12.5kHz bandwidth -- most rigs use an 11kHz deviation max).

In fact, running a 12.5kHz bandwidth (NFM) will sound weaker/softer on a 20kHz (or 25kHz if the radio doesn't really have 20kHz filtering), since the maximum deviation is 75% (11kHz/16kHz) or less (11/20) of that allowed for GMRS primary channels.

If the radio has a microphone gain control (I don't think I've seen such in a GMRS rig) you could try increasing the gain; otherwise, perhaps you need to hold the microphone closer to your mouth (though I recommend just to the side -- to reduce the pops caused by "plosive" syllables)

 

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