Jump to content

deeper dive into why not?


Recommended Posts

so im in the process of studying for my tech (im slow at book learning) and one question that pops into my mind and im not sure if its in the book and i just aint got that far yet is. Why cant a licensed operator use a amateur radio on gmrs, they have taken time to learn the rules and whats expected. now i know there are turds out there that will ruin it for the masses, but what about the people who do follow power and channel rules even if its with a amateur radio instead of a dedicated gmrs radio? i know theres fcc rules and regs on radios, but arent the amateur radios going to have tighter emission and rfi limits which in turn would make them even over classified for gmrs? 

 

or maybe im giving humanity more credit then it deserves and it would be abused by the ones that should have been a poster child for birth control....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

so im in the process of studying for my tech (im slow at book learning) and one question that pops into my mind and im not sure if its in the book and i just aint got that far yet is. Why cant a licensed operator use a amateur radio on gmrs, I'm not certain what your question here is but Amateur and GMRS are two different services. Hams are licensed for Part 97. GMRS for Part 95. Hams are not allowed to operate on GMRS frequencies just as GMRS users are not allowed Ham frequencies. Then there is the issue of equipment. Radios used in Part 95 must be Type Accepted for use on GMRS. Ham radios don't have Part 95 certification. they have taken time to learn the rules and whats expected. now i know there are turds out there that will ruin it for the masses, but what about the people who do follow power and channel rules even if its with a amateur radio instead of a dedicated gmrs radio? i know theres fcc rules and regs on radios, but arent the amateur radios going to have tighter emission and rfi limits which in turn would make them even over classified for gmrs? Now, I hold two licenses, one Part 95 and the other for Part 97. My radio is not Part 95 certified even though it falls within the limits for GMRS. Do I use it, that's undisclosed but it does a good job on the 2 meter and 70 CM bands in Part 97.

 

or maybe im giving humanity more credit then it deserves and it would be abused by the ones that should have been a poster child for birth control....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

so im in the process of studying for my tech (im slow at book learning) and one question that pops into my mind and im not sure if its in the book and i just aint got that far yet is. Why cant a licensed operator use a amateur radio on gmrs, they have taken time to learn the rules and whats expected. now i know there are turds out there that will ruin it for the masses, but what about the people who do follow power and channel rules even if its with a amateur radio instead of a dedicated gmrs radio? i know theres fcc rules and regs on radios, but arent the amateur radios going to have tighter emission and rfi limits which in turn would make them even over classified for gmrs?

 

or maybe im giving humanity more credit then it deserves and it would be abused by the ones that should have been a poster child for birth control....

There are no equipment regulations for amateur radios like there are for Part 90 and 95 radios. While the radios may in fact be better in some cases, they are not FCC certified as better. No, the radios are not allowed to interfere with others outside the amateur space, but the amateur bands are miles wider that the GMRS band. If a GMRS radio splatters a little it is more likely to adversely affect commercial licensees or public service (bad). In an amateur radio splatters a little it is most likely only going to affect other amateurs (not as bad)

 

Also two sets of rules for Amateur and GMRS. Just because you have an amateur license does not mean you know the GMRS rules and vice versus.

 

Many out there choose to disregard the rules and do what you are asking about.

 

Also, much amateur equipment on the market is not capable of limiting the power to the GMRS limits, particularly when it comes to the 467 interstitial frequencies.

 

So there are a few reasons for you. There are others too.

 

 

Michael

WRHS965

KE8PLM

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i guess im looking at it to simplified, and dont understand why it has to be so complicated. in my logical or unlogical mind if a operator has a license for both gmrs and say there gen ticket why shouldn't they be able use a radio thats within the power limits on any of the freqs there able to transmit on, and i thought that most ham radios offer better filtering and better components so splatter and interference would be less then with say a cobra gmrs bubble radio to worry about messing with the commercial radios? i know there are fcc part XX certifications and rules for this and that, states you can do this but not that, i guess its more of a why it has to be this way a question.  

 

in the end maybe its complicated because it has to be for reasons beyond my mental capabilities, and im trying to think to hard about it 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you think of it from everyone's (other than Ham) perspective, it is very simple. FRS/GMRS sliver is in the middle of UHF business band. Allowing ham equipment will certainly wreak a havoc. Part 90 radios have much tighter spec than Ham radios from yesteryear (and today) and lower power limit too. Allowing 1500W ham radios will make these bubble-pack FRS unusable in densely populated areas. There is a thread here about how 1W baby monitors bring GMRS repeaters to their knees. Pity. Imagine what 100W (or 1500W) Ham radio would do to the same repeater and to adjacent land-mobile installation. The point of FRS and GMRS is to give cheap communication option to every random Joe, not to facilitate just another eight (fifteen) 25Hz channels for Hams. Hams do not need them, there is nobody ever on 446.000, and let's not even start on 220MHz - not funny.

But you certainly can use your 'carefully selected' Part 90/95 radios on Ham bands, if you have license.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

From my ham license:

 

Conditions:
Pursuant to §309(h) of the Communications Act of 1934, as amended, 47
U.S.C. §309(h), this license is subject to the following conditions: This
license shall not vest in the licensee any right to operate the station nor any
right in the use of the frequencies designated in the license beyond the
term thereof nor in any other manner than authorized herein. Neither the
license nor the right granted thereunder shall be assigned or otherwise
transferred in violation of the Communications Act of 1934, as amended.
See 47 U.S.C. § 310(d). This license is subject in terms to the right of use
or control conferred by §706 of the Communications Act of 1934, as
amended. See 47 U.S.C. §606.

 

 

That's just how licenses work.

 

I have a "Virage" Go Kart license. It does not extend or allow me any rights beyond their track. It is no good for Formula 1 or to drive on public streets. Louis Hamilton has a Formula 1 license. He still needs a UK drivers license to drive to the supermarket. He can get a Virage go kart license for $3 like I did and zoom around a track for 5 minutes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Another reason is Hams are allowed to build their own radios and other equipment so they would not be Part 95 accepted by the FCC unless you want to go through that process. However, you can use a Part 95 accepted radio for Ham frequencies so you could still use the same radio for both.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Another reason is Hams are allowed to build their own radios and other equipment so they would not be Part 95 accepted by the FCC unless you want to go through that process. However, you can use a Part 95 accepted radio for Ham frequencies so you could still use the same radio for both.

I do not think that is quite true. Most if not all modern GMRS radios are frequency locked and will not transmit on anything but GMRS frequencies. There are some older part 95 radios that are grandfathered and have dual type acceptance available on the used market. I own a modern commercial type 90 (business band) digital radio that can be programmed for GMRS but its still not legal for GMRS use even though its far better than anything I have seen available specifically for GMRS Part 95e use. I personaly do not buy the argument that modern ham radios are inferior to cheap GMRS radios. Only the Cheap Chinese Radios like the uv-5r are a real problem and even at that I just do not buy that a 5 watt HT radio can cause much interference or could cause much spurious interference.

The idea that Hams build there own radios is a real stretch too. Maybe back in the day it was a thing but not anymore especially for UHF use. Truth is that many Hams just don't like GMRS and many GMRS users don't like Hams. Many Hams want it all to be special for them only and think GMRS is just for people to lazy to take a test and use radios responsibly. Many GMRS users think of Hams as cranky old Men who want to feel elite

I am a Ham and now a GMRS user and just want to have friendly conversations on the radio. I don't care what license you have as long as you are respectful and not causing problems. I am an advocate for using any radio that works and doesn't  cause interference. Most Ham radios would be just fine for GMRS and should be allowed.

But what do I know I am just an old not so cranky Ham operator who likes to talk on the radio  GMRS too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use and Guidelines.