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Mounting options for dual radios


Papatree
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Hey y'all,

Any ideas or recommendations for dual radio mounts? I have a Andy 2 cb unit and will be getting the midland mxt275 GMRS unit today and would like to have them both accessible, yet consolidated. On the mxt275 all the controls are on the microphone including a speaker, so technically I could hide the base unit under the seat, but the base also has a speaker, which I like, so I kinda like to keep it out where I can hear it (my hearing isn't what it use to be 😉) . I'm posting a picture of a system, I found on line, as a general concept of what I'm looking to do. I'm just wondering if somewhere they actually make a bracket for dual radio setup. The thing I don't like about the setup in the picture, is it seems the two unit are joined together (maybe with 3m tape) and I'd be concerned about overheating issues, if that is a thing. I feel like I'm trying building some sort of cockpit in my truck  🙂  This is WROA675, thank you in advance and y'all stay well.

radiort.jpg

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27 minutes ago, kb2ztx said:

Being the Andy 2 is pretty small you could mount that via bracket then use velcro or double sided tape to hold the MTX to the bottom if you want it there. 

Thank you for your input. I think I'm hearing that it shouldn't be an issue with having them joined like that (overheating, interference), correct?

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43 minutes ago, Papatree said:

Hey y'all,

Any ideas or recommendations for dual radio mounts? I have a Andy 2 cb unit and will be getting the midland mxt275 GMRS unit today...

 

I don't know much about that radio, but before your ability to refund it expires, be sure that it has the ability to have multiple channels with repeaters on the same frequency but with different tones.

This is essential in a mobile unit or HT where you will be operating outside your normal coverage area.

For example you drive down to San Diego and want the ability to communicate through various repeaters that reside on the same frequency.

Take a look at this $99 retail Anytone AT-779UV a/k/a Radioddity DB-20G (retail $109) for its similar features to what you want but with over 100 channel capability:

Radioddity DB-20G on Amazon

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1 minute ago, MichaelLAX said:

This is essential in a mobile unit or HT where you will be operating outside your normal coverage area.

Copy, thanks. I'll look into it. Off topic...I noticed some of y'all have your location below your profile pix, how do I display mine?

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1 minute ago, Papatree said:

Copy, thanks. I'll look into it. Off topic...I noticed some of y'all have your location below your profile pix, how do I display mine?

Click on your Profile photo here, click on Edit Profile near upper right and then scroll down to Location.

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45 minutes ago, MichaelLAX said:

I don't know much about that radio, but before your ability to refund it expires, be sure that it has the ability to have multiple channels with repeaters on the same frequency but with different tones.

Did a little poking around (mini research) and wasn't able to find a definitive answer to this question, so I emailed Midland and awaiting the answer.

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34 minutes ago, Papatree said:

Did a little poking around (mini research) and wasn't able to find a definitive answer to this question, so I emailed Midland and awaiting the answer.

This video will nail it all for YOU; his favorite viewer!

Randy and the Midland MXT275

and then watch:

Randy and the Radioddity DB-20G

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31 minutes ago, MichaelLAX said:

This video will nail it all for YOU; his favorite viewer!

Ha, great videos. Thank you. I do have mixed feelings and many more questions. For the MXT275, he stated that, no- does not have the ability to have multiple channels with repeaters on the same frequency but with different tones, if I understood Randy correctly (approx. 12.16 video time). He did mention it did have split tone capacity. What does that mean? He mentioned it was narrow band only, but not sure if that can be changed in the settings. When he did the first radio check with the friend 10 miles away, he didn't elaborate what channel he was using, simplex or repeater. However he did go to a repeater channel to hit the one 60 miles away. The DB-20G sounded pretty good too, with the additional ability to have multiple channels with repeaters on the same frequency but with different tones. Randy stated the MXT275 would be good for entry-level users (me) and the DB-20G would be for more advanced (dorks 😮 not my words)users. So now I'm wondering if I just have both and use one as a home base unit, how would I set it up on power? Chances are I can be one of those dorks by the end of the year! 🙂 

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His Midland video was first and before he reviewed the Radioddity.

I will watch 12.16 later but this disadvantage is less pronounced at home, especially where you live, but annoying if in the future more repeaters use the same frequencies, such as 462.700 in SoCal.

Split tone is where the input tone of a Repeater is different than the output tone of that repeater.  That makes it more difficult for users to self-discover the input tone and hence the repeater owner might want to keep out the riff-raff!

Narrowband is to be avoided at all costs: except where it is mandated by the FCC for the so-called low-power (0.5 watts) interstitial channels 467.xxxx Channels 8-14.

He was simplex with his 10 mile away friend.

You would need a home Power Supply that provides 12 volts DC with plenty of amps: Randy recommends one at BuyTwoWayRadios.com for about $150.  Mine was about $90 when Ham Radio Outlet was still in business in Burbank; now their closest is in Anaheim, and you want to avoid shipping costs as they can be heavy.

Check out hamradio.com and the Powerwerx website, too.

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5 minutes ago, MichaelLAX said:

Narrowband is to be avoided at all costs: except where it is mandated by the FCC for the so-called low-power (0.5 watts) interstitial channels 467.xxxx Channels 8-14.

Great, thank you MichaelLAX. I know what I'll be asking Santa for this year(PowerSupply)! I thought Randy said the MXT275 had just eliminated channels 8-14 because it can't transmitted on (gonna go back and rewatch in a little while), however it is still a narrowband radio (confirmed on Midland website). What are the main disadvantages of narrowband and are there any advantages at all? In other words, considering I'm just learning and limited in my GMRS arsenal, would the MXT275 be worth holding on to, in your opinion?

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6 minutes ago, Papatree said:

What are the main disadvantages of narrowband and are there any advantages at all? In other words, considering I'm just learning and limited in my GMRS arsenal, would the MXT275 be worth holding on to, in your opinion?

The main, simple disadvantage is that unless you are standing next to the person you are talking to on the radio, UNLESS they also have a narrowband radio, or are in narrowband-mode on a wideband radio (99.8% of all GMRS radios are wideband), the other person won't be able to hear you very well and will keep saying "what did you say? please talk louder!" ...
IMHO, unless your friends are also using narrowband radios, it is not worth it... There are MANY other radios to choose from, all of which are Wideband, and in many cases, cost less.

...but..what do i know....

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To make a complicated subject a little clearer, the intelligence in an FM signal (GMRS is FM) is carried by the shifting of the frequency within its channel. Wide band signals can shift a total of 5 kHz while narrow band signals can shift only half that amount. The result is two-fold, the signal sounds softer and additional channels or paths for transmission can be created between the wide band channels.

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3 minutes ago, OffRoaderX said:

IMHO, unless your friends are also using narrowband radios, it is not worth it... There are MANY other radios to choose from, all of which are Wideband, and in many cases, cost less.

Thank you OffRoaderX. Besides talking to folks on the trail, how would in perform with repeater use?

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3 minutes ago, Papatree said:

Thank you OffRoaderX. Besides talking to folks on the trail, how would in perform with repeater use?

Everyone on the repeater would keep saying "what did you say? I cant hear you please talk louder!" ...

There is also the issue of not being able to have multiple repeaters on the same frequency with different tones.. .. again.. many radios do this, are wideband, and cost less.

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6 minutes ago, OffRoaderX said:

There is also the issue of not being able to have multiple repeaters on the same frequency with different tones.. .. again.. many radios do this, are wideband, and cost less.

Thanks for your input. I read you loud and clear. 🙂 

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1 hour ago, BoxCar said:

The result is two-fold, the signal sounds softer and additional channels or paths for transmission can be created between the wide band channels.

So the other question is will I need to buy another antenna for the radioddity db20-g or can I still use the midland mxta25 ghost that I just got?

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That is the antenna but I have the one with the PL-259 connector for the Anytone AT-779UV.
 

I assume the Radioddity has the same connector requirements. 
 

tell Bob Yuan I referred you!

Dual band means both VHF and UHF: I opened my unit to transmit on the 2 meter VHF and 70 cm UHF Ham bands too. 

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I'll chime in about the Anytone AT-779UV (and its clones) too. This is the best new mobile radio I've found in the $100 price range. It offers most of the features and benefits of more expensive models with a modest decrease in the amount of output power (~20W vs. ~40 to 50W). There isn't really anything I want or need in a mobile GMRS radio that this radio does not provide. The programming software leaves a bit to be desired, but for GMRS use, I haven't found a need to use the software very often.

As for the power supply, you could even run the AT-779UV off something as inexpensive as this:

https://www.amazon.com/AstroAI-Converter-110-220V-Cigarette-Compressor/dp/B07JGS8CN2/ref=bmx_dp_lke25cro_3/139-8647592-1663754?pd_rd_w=A1g2L&pf_rd_p=f43599e0-aaab-4357-b62a-afc3efe44d3b&pf_rd_r=SSG0JANDV41Y47VZWKEK&pd_rd_r=17727c7b-c740-4179-a1ed-a2d8c0dd4037&pd_rd_wg=bV5lV&pd_rd_i=B07JGS8CN2&psc=1

I wouldn't necessarily recommend it except possibly as a backup as many inexpensive power supplies tend to be "noisy," meaning they cause RF interference.

I'd also recommend a larger power supply to allow you to add more radios and other loads as you get more involved in the hobby. I have a Tekpower 50A Power Supply, but you may not need that much power. More than likely, you could power several radios on 30A or less.

Here's a 30A model for a little over $100:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08GSK6CHL/ref=vp_d_pbp13n_TIER2_cml_lp_B00L2M2Y5O_pd?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B08GSK6CHL&pd_rd_w=WLZXb&pf_rd_p=7fb6c4c4-5294-4fb6-bef5-bacf84e34b1d&pf_rd_r=06GD7DTX1MCK3EMKR0VH&pd_rd_r=4ec948b0-92e1-45ad-af40-f83183caf115&pd_rd_wg=Vi3WN

I cannot speak for the quality of these power supplies, but I wanted to give some ideas about what's available to you if you decide you want to buy one.

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