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Motoral CDM 1550 UHF LS+, 450-520 MHz, 40 WATTS


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I recently purchased two of these radios, one for my base station and one for my Ford Explorer. Can any one point me to some good PC programming software for these?

 

The company that I got them from programmed the first 16 of the 160 channels (14 GMRS and two repeaters) so I am operational, but I really want to become comfortable with my own programming. Any thoughts or suggestions from you Motorola gurus out there will be appreciated.

 

Thanks and Merry Christmas!

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I recently purchased two of these radios, one for my base station and one for my Ford Explorer. Can any one point me to some good PC programming software for these?

 

The company that I got them from programmed the first 16 of the 160 channels (14 GMRS and two repeaters) so I am operational, but I really want to become comfortable with my own programming. Any thoughts or suggestions from you Motorola gurus out there will be appreciated.

 

Thanks and Merry Christmas!

 

The only way you can legitimately acquire any Motorola programming software is to purchase it from Motorola. However, this product was End of Life'd last year, but the software is still listed on their website as available. The part number is HVN9025 and the most recent revision is R06.12.09. You must have an established account with them to purchase it. The software is called CPS (Customer Programming Software) and this radio series is known as the Professional Series. It's also known as the Waris series. Current price on the software is $265. That would normally be a 3 year subscription entitling you to free updates as they are released. Since the radios are EOL, there won't be any future updates to the CPS.

 

There are no alternative programming options. You've got to use the Motorola CPS.

 

If you are running Win 7 or newer, you should use R06.12..05 or newer. Older versions are not stable on Win 7 64 bit.

 

It also requires a specific cable for use between the radio and the computer. They can be purchased inexpensively on Ebay and elsewhere in the USB version.

 

There's a steep learning curve to programming these radios correctly. Since you only have two of them and may only reprogram them a few times, it may be more cost effective to find someone locally who can do them.

 

Depending on the exact model of CDM1550, you may only have 16 conventional channels available to you. Post the full model number of the radio and I'll look it up for you. (I am responsible for a half dozen of the radios in our ambulance squad plus I also have several of my own, both VHF and UHF. The county where I live is 100% CDM radios for the fire service.)

 

You may already know this, but the CDM's are not type accepted for GMRS use. That's not a criticism, just tossing out the info.

 

You have the "S" split radios there (450 to 512). They can be hacked down to the 440 range for ham use, but it's a bit of trick involving some hex editing. The "R" split (403 to 470) models are easily found on the used market. My UHF CDM's are all the "R" split version and can do amateur, GRMS, and much of the Part 90 block.

 

Especially for the car, get yourself a Motorola external speaker. It will improve the sound quality dramatically. They're on Ebay all the time. Let me know if you need a part number or two. Several different ones will work just fine with the CDM. I have some tan ones here now. If you're interested, drop me a PM.

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The only way you can legitimately acquire any Motorola programming software is to purchase it from Motorola. However, this product was End of Life'd last year, but the software is still listed on their website as available. The part number is HVN9025 and the most recent revision is R06.12.09. You must have an established account with them to purchase it. The software is called CPS (Customer Programming Software) and this radio series is known as the Professional Series. It's also known as the Waris series. Current price on the software is $265. That would normally be a 3 year subscription entitling you to free updates as they are released. Since the radios are EOL, there won't be any future updates to the CPS.

 

There are no alternative programming options. You've got to use the Motorola CPS.

 

If you are running Win 7 or newer, you should use R06.12..05 or newer. Older versions are not stable on Win 7 64 bit.

 

It also requires a specific cable for use between the radio and the computer. They can be purchased inexpensively on Ebay and elsewhere in the USB version.

 

There's a steep learning curve to programming these radios correctly. Since you only have two of them and may only reprogram them a few times, it may be more cost effective to find someone locally who can do them.

 

Depending on the exact model of CDM1550, you may only have 16 conventional channels available to you. Post the full model number of the radio and I'll look it up for you. (I am responsible for a half dozen of the radios in our ambulance squad plus I also have several of my own, both VHF and UHF. The county where I live is 100% CDM radios for the fire service.)

 

You may already know this, but the CDM's are not type accepted for GMRS use. That's not a criticism, just tossing out the info.

 

You have the "S" split radios there (450 to 512). They can be hacked down to the 440 range for ham use, but it's a bit of trick involving some hex editing. The "R" split (403 to 470) models are easily found on the used market. My UHF CDM's are all the "R" split version and can do amateur, GRMS, and much of the Part 90 block.

 

Especially for the car, get yourself a Motorola external speaker. It will improve the sound quality dramatically. They're on Ebay all the time. Let me know if you need a part number or two. Several different ones will work just fine with the CDM. I have some tan ones here now. If you're interested, drop me a PM.

 

Thanks for the wealth of information in your post!!  Model number is: AAM25RKF9DP6AN.  

 

Not being type accepted is a real bummer for me...I really thought I had finally crossed all the T's and dotted all the I's with these radios. 

 

If you can send me a model number for the external speaker for the car I would appreciate it.

 

They are advertised as having 160 channels but who knows. Again thanks for all the help...much appreciated.

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Thanks for the wealth of information in your post!!  Model number is: AAM25RKF9DP6AN.  

 

Not being type accepted is a real bummer for me...I really thought I had finally crossed all the T's and dotted all the I's with these radios. 

 

If you can send me a model number for the external speaker for the car I would appreciate it.

 

They are advertised as having 160 channels but who knows. Again thanks for all the help...much appreciated.

 

 

My model number chart says 9DP6 is a Passport & LTR radio capable of 160 LTR frequencies. Some of the older (pre-2004) were limited to 16 conventional channels. Anything newer than that should be 160 conventional channels. There's a serial number decoder on batlabs.com that will tell you when the radio was made.

 

Sorry about the type acceptance. As we all know, Part 90 radios meet and exceed the Part 95A specs. My UHF mobile in the truck is a CDM1250, 25 watts, 403-470, and 64 channel capacity. Same radio as the 1550, but no trunking or Passport. The 1250 is actually better for MDC, Quick-Call II, and DTMF. The 1550's are variable on what they support. It's fine for all the UHF services I use.

 

Also, if you purchase the CPS from Motorola, you will have to also obtain an EID for wide band programming for your GMRS channels. Versions R06.12.07 and older don't require the EID. Motorola locked the software for the narrowband mandate ignoring ham and other bands that use wideband.

 

HSN4010 for the tan speaker, HSN4018 for black. There are others that will work fine, too. You will need a plug kit to connect the speaker to the accessory connector on the back of the radio. I also recommend using Ignition Sense in the car so the radio comes on and off with the key. If you want, I can give you purchase info on that, or if you want a tan speaker ready to plug into the radio, drop me a PM.

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My model number chart says 9DP6 is a Passport & LTR radio capable of 160 LTR frequencies. Some of the older (pre-2004) were limited to 16 conventional channels. Anything newer than that should be 160 conventional channels. There's a serial number decoder on batlabs.com that will tell you when the radio was made.

 

Sorry about the type acceptance. As we all know, Part 90 radios meet and exceed the Part 95A specs. My UHF mobile in the truck is a CDM1250, 25 watts, 403-470, and 64 channel capacity. Same radio as the 1550, but no trunking or Passport. The 1250 is actually better for MDC, Quick-Call II, and DTMF. The 1550's are variable on what they support. It's fine for all the UHF services I use.

 

Also, if you purchase the CPS from Motorola, you will have to also obtain an EID for wide band programming for your GMRS channels. Versions R06.12.07 and older don't require the EID. Motorola locked the software for the narrowband mandate ignoring ham and other bands that use wideband.

 

HSN4010 for the tan speaker, HSN4018 for black. There are others that will work fine, too. You will need a plug kit to connect the speaker to the accessory connector on the back of the radio. I also recommend using Ignition Sense in the car so the radio comes on and off with the key. If you want, I can give you purchase info on that, or if you want a tan speaker ready to plug into the radio, drop me a PM.

Remember the Audio PA is floating so DO NOT ground either of the speaker leads. Doing so will destroy the audio amp. They are made to float with an 8 ohm load.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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Remember the Audio PA is floating so DO NOT ground either of the speaker leads. Doing so will destroy the audio amp. They are made to float with an 8 ohm load.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

 

Which is why I am offering the OP a speaker with the correct accessory connector correctly wired for the external speaker and ignition sense. Pins 1 & 16 for the speaker with no grounding, and Pin 10 for ignition sense.

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My model number chart says 9DP6 is a Passport & LTR radio capable of 160 LTR frequencies. Some of the older (pre-2004) were limited to 16 conventional channels. Anything newer than that should be 160 conventional channels. There's a serial number decoder on batlabs.com that will tell you when the radio was made.

 

Sorry about the type acceptance. As we all know, Part 90 radios meet and exceed the Part 95A specs. My UHF mobile in the truck is a CDM1250, 25 watts, 403-470, and 64 channel capacity. Same radio as the 1550, but no trunking or Passport. The 1250 is actually better for MDC, Quick-Call II, and DTMF. The 1550's are variable on what they support. It's fine for all the UHF services I use.

 

Also, if you purchase the CPS from Motorola, you will have to also obtain an EID for wide band programming for your GMRS channels. Versions R06.12.07 and older don't require the EID. Motorola locked the software for the narrowband mandate ignoring ham and other bands that use wideband.

 

HSN4010 for the tan speaker, HSN4018 for black. There are others that will work fine, too. You will need a plug kit to connect the speaker to the accessory connector on the back of the radio. I also recommend using Ignition Sense in the car so the radio comes on and off with the key. If you want, I can give you purchase info on that, or if you want a tan speaker ready to plug into the radio, drop me a PM.

 

After reviewing all of your suggestions and advice I think the better part of wisdom for me will be to hire out the programming (hopefully local). I really am almost there with the exception of a few of the local fire and rescue and school bus frequencies (which I like to listen to) and about 10 more repeaters that I may encounter in my travels about Virginia, West Virginia and Maryland.

 

My lack of knowledge of this type of radio may limit me in selecting programming features (options) that may be useful. For instance, I don't know if the low power setting is adjustable or fixed in the programming. Right now it appears to be set to 20/40 watts. It would be useful to be able to drop the power levels to 5 watts or so for short range operations.

 

The plug kit sounds like what I need for the base station set up as well (are they usually listed with the speakers)? It came with the power supply, desk microphone, and cradle/speaker combination but I could never figure out how to plug in the external speaker. Also, thanks for the offer of the brown external speaker for the car, but I think I'll just go ahead and order a black one to match the radio. As far as the ignition wiring goes I usually wire my radios directly to the battery, reasoning that if I ever get into a bad situation and loose my keys I'll still be able to call for help on the radio. Of course as you suggest the down side is forgetting to turn it off and running down the battery.

 

Another question for you, have you found a mobile antenna that you prefer for these radios? Thanks again for all the information and recommendations and Merry Christmas to all!

 

 

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After reviewing all of your suggestions and advice I think the better part of wisdom for me will be to hire out the programming (hopefully local). I really am almost there with the exception of a few of the local fire and rescue and school bus frequencies (which I like to listen to) and about 10 more repeaters that I may encounter in my travels about Virginia, West Virginia and Maryland.

 

My lack of knowledge of this type of radio may limit me in selecting programming features (options) that may be useful. For instance, I don't know if the low power setting is adjustable or fixed in the programming. Right now it appears to be set to 20/40 watts. It would be useful to be able to drop the power levels to 5 watts or so for short range operations.

 

The plug kit sounds like what I need for the base station set up as well (are they usually listed with the speakers)? It came with the power supply, desk microphone, and cradle/speaker combination but I could never figure out how to plug in the external speaker. Also, thanks for the offer of the brown external speaker for the car, but I think I'll just go ahead and order a black one to match the radio. As far as the ignition wiring goes I usually wire my radios directly to the battery, reasoning that if I ever get into a bad situation and loose my keys I'll still be able to call for help on the radio. Of course as you suggest the down side is forgetting to turn it off and running down the battery.

 

Another question for you, have you found a mobile antenna that you prefer for these radios? Thanks again for all the information and recommendations and Merry Christmas to all!

 

 

 

20 Watts is about as low as the programming allows in the 40 watt models. If you needed lower power, the 25 watt models can be pushed way down to 5 watts or so.

 

Look up a seller on Ebay named mre1032 - he sells a kit for the external speaker and ignition sense accessory connector. It's wired correctly and all you have to do is connect to the speaker and ignition/accessory power. This seller is retired LE and is now a consultant. He's highly respected in the Motorola world. He offers a bunch of other items that you may be interested in so look over all of his stuff for the CDM's.

 

I keep a small stock of the accessory connectors and pre-terminated wires here so that I can make up pretty much anything needed for a CDM and many of the other Motorola legacy radios that use the 16 or 20 pin accessory connector.

 

Helpful hint: In regard to what you seem to need right now, the CDM750, 1250, and 1550 radios all use the same accessories.  So a mic or remote connector advertised for one would work with any of them.

 

I went with the tan speakers because they match the interior of my truck. Strictly personal preference in regards to color. I bought 4 more of them because they were dirt cheap with free shipping. I already have uses for two of them but the others are just sitting there. I have one black one left, but that's committed to a near future project.

 

On the CDM's they can be programmed (and should be) for On/Off and Ignition Sense. The radio comes on or off with the key, plus you can still turn it on manually without the key. Make sure your programmer sets it that way, even if you don't use ignition sense at first.

 

I just use good quality quarter wave antennas with NMO mounts. I've rarely seen an instance where a gain antenna bought that much over a properly installed quarter wave with a good ground plane. Plus, the approximately 6" quarter wave is darned near invisible, especially if you use the black ones like I do.

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20 Watts is about as low as the programming allows in the 40 watt models. If you needed lower power, the 25 watt models can be pushed way down to 5 watts or so.

 

Look up a seller on Ebay named mre1032 - he sells a kit for the external speaker and ignition sense accessory connector. It's wired correctly and all you have to do is connect to the speaker and ignition/accessory power. This seller is retired LE and is now a consultant. He's highly respected in the Motorola world. He offers a bunch of other items that you may be interested in so look over all of his stuff for the CDM's.

 

I keep a small stock of the accessory connectors and pre-terminated wires here so that I can make up pretty much anything needed for a CDM and many of the other Motorola legacy radios that use the 16 or 20 pin accessory connector.

 

Helpful hint: In regard to what you seem to need right now, the CDM750, 1250, and 1550 radios all use the same accessories.  So a mic or remote connector advertised for one would work with any of them.

 

I went with the tan speakers because they match the interior of my truck. Strictly personal preference in regards to color. I bought 4 more of them because they were dirt cheap with free shipping. I already have uses for two of them but the others are just sitting there. I have one black one left, but that's committed to a near future project.

 

On the CDM's they can be programmed (and should be) for On/Off and Ignition Sense. The radio comes on or off with the key, plus you can still turn it on manually without the key. Make sure your programmer sets it that way, even if you don't use ignition sense at first.

 

I just use good quality quarter wave antennas with NMO mounts. I've rarely seen an instance where a gain antenna bought that much over a properly installed quarter wave with a good ground plane. Plus, the approximately 6" quarter wave is darned near invisible, especially if you use the black ones like I do.

 

 

 

Thanks again for all the great information!  I really never considered a 6" antenna but it makes sense. I currently have four (4) mag mount mobile antennas, two are VHF/UHF and two are just UHF single band. The shortest is a UHF 19" and has become my favorite due to getting in and out of the garage and it also seems to give me the most power out. I will definitely check out your guy (mre1032) on Ebay and give him some business.

 

So far I'm really impressed by the build quality of these Motorola Radios. They are just rock solid compared to some of the "ChiComs" that I've owned. One more question regarding antenna systems. When I put a Power/SWR meter inline with the antenna/coax combination I sometimes show considerably different output power. I may get 30 watts out from one antenna and 20 watts out from another antenna with a 40 watt radio. In each case the SWR barely moves and I'm showing no reflected power. I've tried it with different radios and the results are always the same, different antenna system, different power out.  I have one 50 watt mobile that can barely manage 22 watts output. Interestingly the same make and model but a different radio was showing 32 watts out on the same mobile antenna. I assume that the load that the antenna and coax represent is not a perfect 50 ohms but shouldn't I see some SWR or Reflected power differences?

 

DH 

 

 

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