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What power supply to get?


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#1 Guest_Brooklyn_*

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Posted 24 July 2019 - 11:41 AM

Hello,

 

I registered for my license today, so I'm waiting for a call-sign to register here. In mean time I want to get all my supplies.

I bought a Kenwood TK880H v1, got the KPG49D software, USB cable, but now I need a power supply and antenna for this radio so I can start programming it.

 

Kenwood specs state 880H draws 12amps, should I get a 20amp switching power supply?  Can I go higher like a 30amp in case I'll be using different radios that will draw more amps or is it bad for lower amp radios? Which power supplies have a good reputation with radio users because I read online of a lot of complaints about long term quality or RF interference.  Is Pyramid brand any good? (I'm trying to avoid spending more on power supply than the radio itself.)

 

Another question is antenna. I live on a 6th floor and have a fire escape to mount the antenna.  The goal is to reach 30 miles out to where family is. 

I read about Ed Fong antenna; is it good for GMRS or you recommend something else? Can I get away with a smaller, mobile antenna or those have big trade offs?  All the tips or links to where I can read more here will be greatly appreciated.  Thank You!



#2 WRAK968

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Posted 25 July 2019 - 01:08 PM

Welcome to MyGMRS :)

To start out with, The Amps rating on the radio should always be lower than that of the power supply. The Kenwood 880H (nice choice as this is the only radio I run BTW) uses 12.8Amps when transmitting on high power. Using a 15 amp or higher power supply that delivers 12.5-13.5 volts should be fine. I use https://www.amazon.c...0?ie=UTF8&psc=1 this power supply for the house "base" radio. I do get a slight hum when the fan turns on, but for the most part it works without an issue. The whine should go away if I use a choke on the power wires but I was too lazy to order them.

I do not know much about Ed Fong antennas to really give you much advice on them. They seem to be custom home built antennas, which could be hit or miss. There are commercially available antennas for the 460-470 mhz range that may work better. I originally used a diamond 200U with good results, Now I use a comet 712EFC which has higher gain and is working great. One thing to note about mounting however. Keep in mind the primary use of a fire escape. You will need to run your feedline and mount the antenna in a way that would not interfere with an emergency evacuation should it ever occur. You would not believe how many times I've seen ham radio operators and CB'rs just throw the feedline across the fire escape completely blocking it should people need to evacuate. Or they mount Yagi antennas (a directional antenna) that block the escape. When I talk to some of them it seems their concern was that they could escape and the hell with the rest. They just don't realize they could be charged if someone is hurt or killed should a fire break out. So be sure to take great care with that for everyones safety!


 


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#3 axorlov

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Posted 25 July 2019 - 02:33 PM

I use Astron SS-18 (15A continuous, 18A peak) with TK880H, bought it used off ebay. I tried Ed Fong's antenna, did not work for me well. SWR was very high. J-pole antennas need an efficient RF choke (that Ed Fong antenna lacks) to suppress common mode current, otherwise the feed cable becomes part of antenna and wreaks havoc with SWR and pattern, especially when routed close to metal mast or support. Another thing to consider is that you do not need 2m band, since your radio is TK880. Ed Fong's antenna is 5 feet long, being 2m-70cm antenna. I now use Browning BR-6140, works much better, about 2' long. Newegg still has them for $35. However, with 30miles distance, even on the 6th floor, you may need a directional antenna.


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#4 BoxCar

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Posted 25 July 2019 - 04:20 PM

I use the same power supply (https://www.amazon.c...0?ie=UTF8&psc=1) for my radio. I intend to use it to power a repeater in the near future so the added output capacity will be used. You don't need a matched pair of radios as a radio with a much lower output power can be the receiver with the transmit unit having the higher power.


Old and wise infers you were once young and stupid


#5 WRAK968

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Posted 25 July 2019 - 05:22 PM

I use the same power supply (https://www.amazon.c...0?ie=UTF8&psc=1) for my radio. I intend to use it to power a repeater in the near future so the added output capacity will be used. You don't need a matched pair of radios as a radio with a much lower output power can be the receiver with the transmit unit having the higher power.

I use one for a portable repeater when its not running on battery power :) good little units



#6 Guest_Brooklyn_*

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Posted 28 July 2019 - 04:49 PM

I bought a power supply off ebay, found a decent price for a 23amp. I now will need to do good research on which antenna to buy.
Since directional antennas were recommended to hit 30 mile range, are there drawbacks to them and do they have to be large/wide for them to work well? What db gain should I be going for?

#7 WRAK968

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Posted 28 July 2019 - 07:29 PM

I have little experience with directional antennas, however I do know that one drawback is that they are directional. Another words, you can have great signal 20 miles away lets say, North of your location, and crappy signal 1 mile away West of your location. Directional or "Beam" antennas are just that, one direction or beam.



#8 Guest_Guest_*

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Posted 01 August 2019 - 09:27 PM

I’m now a registered member. I got the Samlex sec 1223 power-supply and trying to figure out how to wire the terminals on the supply. This older model uses banana plugs for terminals. The screws don’t come off. What are my options to good wiring? What type of terminals could work here? I tried looking for higher amp banana plugs but not finding anything cheap.
977-DE92-B-B090-4588-AECE-242-C15-D7-AE8

B842-F24-D-3-FE2-4531-AFDE-8-F0-D515-BD0

#9 BoxCar

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Posted 02 August 2019 - 06:06 AM

With the two choices you have your options are a little limited. If you see the power supply and radio as being fixed and not moving then a 14 or 16 gauge wire between the two terminals and your radio fed through the holes will be sufficient. The preferred wire would be stranded with a rubber or THNN plastic covering as insulation. If you think you will be moving the radio and/or the power supply around then use the banana plugs with a rubber or silicon insulated wire of the same gauge.


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#10 Jones

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Posted 02 August 2019 - 08:46 AM

For high-current banana plugs, I have very excellent results using Mediabridge SPC-BP2 plugs. Shop carefully, as the price varies widely, and wildly.  The best buy is picking them up in 12-pair packs for under $30, if you can use that many.



#11 nyc787

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Posted 02 August 2019 - 11:26 AM

For high-current banana plugs, I have very excellent results using Mediabridge SPC-BP2 plugs. Shop carefully, as the price varies widely, and wildly.  The best buy is picking them up in 12-pair packs for under $30, if you can use that many.

How do you wire these plugs because they don't look like you can crimp the wires to them?



#12 axorlov

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Posted 02 August 2019 - 12:54 PM

Mu suggestion would be either to:

- rewire radio with Anderson powerpoles, and fabricate a pigtail for the power supply;

- rewire radio with Yaesu-Kenwood-Icom T-connector, and fabricate a pigtail for the power supply;

- keep existing connector on the radio (I think it is GM-style car radio power connector, available at auto-stores) and fabricate a pigtail with corresponding connector for the power supply.



#13 kidphc

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Posted 02 August 2019 - 02:39 PM

Mu suggestion would be either to:

- rewire radio with Anderson powerpoles, and fabricate a pigtail for the power supply;

- rewire radio with Yaesu-Kenwood-Icom T-connector, and fabricate a pigtail for the power supply;

- keep existing connector on the radio (I think it is GM-style car radio power connector, available at auto-stores) and fabricate a pigtail with corresponding connector for the power supply.

 

My vote is for the rewire with Andersons. I pretty much use Andersons for my radios all the way down to my RC helis. You can even make them into a "T" shape to help with not miss connecting them. Once you start converting, who cares what type it came with because the wire cutter and crimpers are coming out it 10 seconds.



#14 berkinet

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Posted 02 August 2019 - 03:11 PM

[...You can even make them into a "T" shape to help with not miss connecting them.

Standard PowerPoles have a small key that allows two connectors (black and red) to be connected together. In this manner it is impossible to mis-connect them. You can also buy them already bonded together in the same manner, or just glue them together with super glue, or, if you have no other means, just wrap tape around the pair of connectors.

Everything we hear is an opinion, not a fact. Everything we see is a perspective, not the truth.

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#15 kidphc

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Posted 02 August 2019 - 03:13 PM

I love the power pole buss personally. Used them extensively on high voltage rc heli applications. Learned to start making them into T's after I popped a BEC (Battery Eliminator Circuit) by simply trying to color code them. Well that was a very expensive lesson.



#16 nyc787

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Posted 02 August 2019 - 04:52 PM

I did cut off Kenwood plugs and installed Anderson power-poles on the radio end. Is this plug my answer to the power supply wiring?
https://powerwerx.co...g-adapter-cable it just has negative review.

#17 BoxCar

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Posted 02 August 2019 - 05:21 PM

It will definitely work. The 12 gauge wire will handle all the current your radio will ever need.


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#18 Jones

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Posted 03 August 2019 - 08:03 AM

How do you wire these plugs because they don't look like you can crimp the wires to them?

RE: SPC-BP2 Banana plugs...

 

These screw together, and have a compression-fit internal base with teeth all around the plug center core.  You strip the wire back about 3/8 of an inch, put the wire up through the plug shell, and then fan the wire strands out around the teeth.  Screw the plug body back onto the pin, and tighten down.  VERY solid connection with no crimping, no soldering, and no tools other than the wire stripper.

 

EDIT: Note... You cannot use these with solid wire. Must be stranded.

 

Edit again: INSTRUCTIONS: https://images-na.ss...bL._SL1500_.jpg



#19 Guest_WQQL731_*

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Posted 05 August 2019 - 09:25 AM

Looking at your power supply terminals, by chance do they screw inwards in a clockwise turn to tighten? If so just tin the ends of your power lead and insert through the holes in the terminals and tighten the red and black plastic knurled knobs onto the wire for a "locked in" grip on the wires.

 

WQQL731



#20 Logan5

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Posted 06 August 2019 - 11:32 AM

I like the battery power supply option, You would purchase a nice deep cycle battery and an appropriate low noise charger for said battery. then connect your gear to the battery via a fused circuit. Your power will generally be 13.8v and during grid power fail, you will still have 12.5 to 13v and several hours of stand by power. In my case, I have a 110AH lead acid battery under my bench and 12v power outlets at my work space. I also have several 12v powered tools and a ventilation fan. I also have a 9" LED TV that only uses 5.5 watts. Great post storm set up, keeps communications going for several hours. Our repeater has a 55 AH AGM battery and operates for up to a day of lite to moderate use. clean quite power supplies like Astron can cost several hundred, this set is comparable in price.


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