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GMRS study guide


Guest Chris
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Guest Chris

So in amateur radio, you must study and test for your license.  If you pass the test, you theoretically have, or at least have been exposed to, and have a layman's written guide to, the rules.  Since they'll literally issue the GMRS license to anyone with enough knowledge to fill out the application and make the payment, there is no need for studying the rules prior to the application.  Aside from reading part 95 directly, is there any kind of layman's guide to GMRS, like a GMRS for Dummies guide?  I'm WELL versed in reading Federal code.  That's exactly WHY I'm looking for a more user-friendly option.

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When I took my ham tech test, the basis of the test was "Use common sense."  Another-words, don't stick metal objects into places they weren't meant to be, don't erect an antenna under power lines, I think the only things that stood out from the test were the frequencies I could use, transmit powers, and Q codes, which I only remember a few of anyways.

On GMRS, the frequencies and transmit power you can use may be found here:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_Mobile_Radio_Service

Codes are frowned upon on GMRS, and the rest you basically learn from research, or as you meet other GMRS users or from ideas you've come up with. Again, COMMON SENSE is key so no using an extension cord from your neighbors house to power your repeater, or buying a chinese amp to push 500 watts to transmit.

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GMRS, if I remember correctly started back in the late 70'sor early 80's as a step up from the morass that was CB at the time. My father was a radio dealer operating out of a spare bedroom peddling CBs, antennas and linears along with modified ham gear on the 11 meter band. He and my mother were also in REACT and did move to GMRS because of the pollution on 27 MHz. The biggest thing for them was the ability to set up repeaters to make up for the short range All this was back when the channels were also open for business. I believe their REACT team also made the switch to the "UHF CB" channels. 

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So in amateur radio, you must study and test for your license.  If you pass the test, you theoretically have, or at least have been exposed to, and have a layman's written guide to, the rules.  Since they'll literally issue the GMRS license to anyone with enough knowledge to fill out the application and make the payment, there is no need for studying the rules prior to the application.  Aside from reading part 95 directly, is there any kind of layman's guide to GMRS, like a GMRS for Dummies guide?  I'm WELL versed in reading Federal code.  That's exactly WHY I'm looking for a more user-friendly option.

 

GMRS...……...

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Guest Jonathan

The forums here are a good reference, as are the multiple Facebook pages devoted to GMRS.  While some of the Facebok pages are a little funny at times, they tend to provide good insight into the technology and general operational scheme of GMRS. 

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GMRS is License by Rule...

Are you sure of that? FRS is certainly licensed by rule - you use a certified radio in an approved manner (by following the rules) and you are effectively licensed to use the service. But, I am pretty sure GMRS is explicitly licensed. You must apply, pay the fee, and be granted a license to use the service. You must then follow the rules or risk losing your license.
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Are you sure of that? FRS is certainly licensed by rule - you use a certified radio in an approved manner (by following the rules) and you are effectively licensed to use the service. But, I am pretty sure GMRS is explicitly licensed. You must apply, pay the fee, and be granted a license to use the service. You must then follow the rules or risk losing your license.

 

I was???????????

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Guest Chris

I was trying to encourage the OP to read the Part 95E rules without getting to technical.. All Radio Services in the U.S. are governed by Rules & Regulations regardless of the licensing scheme used by a particular Service. 

 I don't need to be encouraged to read part 95E because I've already read it.  I was just wondering if there was a summary somewhere because the CFR is not always straightforward.  I wanted to make sure that I didn't miss anything.  This is particularly important since the recent rule change has left an abundance of conflicting information all over the internet. 

 

Chris 

WRFS756

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 I don't need to be encouraged to read part 95E because I've already read it.  I was just wondering if there was a summary somewhere because the CFR is not always straightforward.  I wanted to make sure that I didn't miss anything.  This is particularly important since the recent rule change has left an abundance of conflicting information all over the internet. 

 

Chris 

WRFS756

 

I'm sorry, I didn't mean to offend you, please excuse me...….

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Are you sure of that? FRS is certainly licensed by rule - you use a certified radio in an approved manner (by following the rules) and you are effectively licensed to use the service. But, I am pretty sure GMRS is explicitly licensed. You must apply, pay the fee, and be granted a license to use the service. You must then follow the rules or risk losing your license.

 

Next time I'll keep quiet, and let you regulars answer all Q's...… Me not smart enough :)

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Hi BoxCar-

 

   GMRS came into existence in 1947, when the first license was issued to Al Gross, of Cleveland.  He is the electronics engineer who conceived of CItizens' Radio as World War II came to a close.  I can tell you a lot more about the history of GMRS if you are interested.  Randy Knowles, KAA 8142.

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Randy most surely knows the history of GMRS! After all, the very first personal use repeater in the US was his... smile.png

 

In January (1971) NSEA placed the first cooperatively licensed all personal use Class A repeater in the United States in service on the top of a building at Willow and Waukegan Roads, in Northfield, Illinois.

Source: https://nsea.com/nseainfo.htm
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