Jump to content

BuyTwoWayRadios.com

New GMRS Licensee - Confused about repeaters?


23 replies to this topic

#1 Guest_Puneet_*

Guest_Puneet_*
  • Guests

Posted 12 August 2020 - 11:23 PM

Folks, 

 

A bit confused about use of repeaters, and understanding their use is what's gonna drive what radio I end up buying. I understand them conceptually and am exciting to pull the trigger on a Midland MXT 400, 40 Watt GMRS Micro Mobile radio, but I don't have a complete understanding of repeaters to be sure to buy it. Here are my questions: 

 

1) Midland says that certain channels in its radio are already pre-programmed to repeater frequencies so one does not have to program.  SO, my question is that don't repeaters nationwide work on their own unique frequencies, so by having pre programmed frequencies, am I stuck to use only a few repeaters? It does not make sense, I must be missing something here....please help clarify.

 

2) When do I actually need a repeater anyway? So, if my team is out of range, is it then when I am calling the repeater to let me use them?  And do they have to push a button or something to allow me, and then what? It just increases my range by 30 some odd miles automatically cuz its being relayed by the repeater? Is that how it works, i.e. ask to be catapulted into a longer range by that repeater tower.   Please clarify. 

 

I have tried but can't find answers anywhere else, so I hope someone can shed some light on these basic questions.  

 

Thank you very much! 



#2 WQEJ577

WQEJ577

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • 206 posts
  • LocationCentral Jersey
  • GMRS Callsign:WQEJ577
  • Ham Callsign:N2DLX

Posted 13 August 2020 - 08:51 AM

Welcome!

 

1) The Midland radios have the ability to enable the 8 extra channels for repeater use. These will transmit on 467.xxx MHz and receive on 462.xxx MHz, whereas the simplex (direct) channels will transmit and receive on the same 462.xxx MHz frequency. In addition to the frequency a repeater transmits, there is also the CTCSS tone (also known as PL tone) which allows a repeater to selectively repeat transmissions from one group of users when others may be on the same shared frequency.

 

On more advanced radios, you would set up a channel for each repeater in the radio's memory, where they would each be one of the 8 repeater channels (i.e. 462.550 MHz), but the CTCSS tone would vary for each repeater. On the Midlands, you need to manually change the tone to use a different repeater.

 

So in the example above, you'd tune to channel 15R (repeater channel) and set the tone in the menu to whatever the local repeater on Channel 15 (462.550) requires. If you go to a new area where there is another repeater also on 462.550, you would stay on Channel 15 but change the tone to whatever that new repeater uses.

 

2) A repeater will extend the range a single radios has by many miles, depending on the height of the repeater in elevation. If two radios are nearby but suddenly cannot communicate due to the terrain or distance, a nearby repeater located in a tall spot (a tower, a tall building, or a mountain top) will allow those radios to communicate by retransmitting the signal at higher power and at a higher location. UHF frequencies are almost line-of-sight, where two stations can communicate if there is an unobstructed view between antennas.

 

By putting the repeater antenna high up, it will be able to "see" a much larger area and thus extend the mobile units' coverage over the greater area it can "see" from its height. So a radio with a 1 mile range can suddenly get 15-30 mile range if there is a repeater in a good spot high above the average terrain height by having the repeater retransmit its signal at a higher power and elevation. Repeaters have a limit to their range based on this elevation, as the visual horizon distance changes with regard to height above the ground.

 

Since the Earth is curved (flat-earthers will be disappointed), the further away you go from a station, you begin to curve below the horizon and eventually the Earth itself will block the signal. The only way around that is more height, and that's how satellites can have such wide coverage. They are essentially a repeater at an extreme altitude and thus they have visual line-of-sight to a much, much larger area than a tower on the ground could ever have.


Rich Dunajewski

Founder, myGMRS.com

 


#3 BoxCar

BoxCar

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 159 posts
  • LocationArden, NC
  • GMRS Callsign:WRCM737

Posted 13 August 2020 - 05:28 PM

Folks, 

 

A bit confused about use of repeaters, and understanding their use is what's gonna drive what radio I end up buying. I understand them conceptually and am exciting to pull the trigger on a Midland MXT 400, 40 Watt GMRS Micro Mobile radio, but I don't have a complete understanding of repeaters to be sure to buy it. Here are my questions: 

 

1) Midland says that certain channels in its radio are already pre-programmed to repeater frequencies so one does not have to program.  SO, my question is that don't repeaters nationwide work on their own unique frequencies, so by having pre programmed frequencies, am I stuck to use only a few repeaters? It does not make sense, I must be missing something here....please help clarify.

 

2) When do I actually need a repeater anyway? So, if my team is out of range, is it then when I am calling the repeater to let me use them?  And do they have to push a button or something to allow me, and then what? It just increases my range by 30 some odd miles automatically cuz its being relayed by the repeater? Is that how it works, i.e. ask to be catapulted into a longer range by that repeater tower.   Please clarify. 

 

I have tried but can't find answers anywhere else, so I hope someone can shed some light on these basic questions.  

 

Thank you very much! 

While the Midlands are a good solid radio, they are not fully compatible with most GMRS radios. The Midland MXT400 is a narrow band radio meaning the signal from the radio is roughly half of what wide band radios have. This does not have a significant affect on the radio's range but it does affect the intelligibility of the voice signal. GMRS is a wide band system with the companion, Family Radio Service is narrowband. There are other brands of radios designed for GMRS/FRS service that can operate both wideband on GMRS and narrow on FRS. The current MXT400 cannot do this. There are reports Midland will correct this in a new versio of the MXT400 sometime this fall/winter.


Old and wise infers you were once young and stupid


#4 berkinet

berkinet

    Senior expert on absolutely nothing

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 716 posts
  • GMRS Callsign:WQYR510
  • Ham Callsign:WB6TAE

Posted 13 August 2020 - 05:42 PM

While the Midlands are a good solid radio, they are not fully compatible with most GMRS radios. The Midland MXT400 is a narrow band radio ...

It has been reported on this forum that the MXT400 can be user programmed to wide-band.

https://forums.mygmr...pdates/?p=17118

Everything we hear is an opinion, not a fact. Everything we see is a perspective, not the truth.

-- Marcus Aurelius


#5 BoxCar

BoxCar

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 159 posts
  • LocationArden, NC
  • GMRS Callsign:WRCM737

Posted 13 August 2020 - 06:05 PM

Thanks for the correction. However, the documentation provided by Midland on this radio state everything is preprogrammed with no mention of the ability to modify the factory presets.


Old and wise infers you were once young and stupid


#6 Danny

Danny

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 13 posts
  • LocationBloomington, MN
  • GMRS Callsign:WRJJ275

Posted 11 September 2020 - 06:08 PM

So I just received my license earlier this week. I'm still trying to figure things out. I bought my first GMRS radio Wouxun 805G. I plan on buying another radio GMRS radio this weekend.

I will be using my radio to communicate with friends and family. My radio looks to be pre-programmed for the GMRS frequencies. 

 

I see there is one repeater in the Twin Cities called Metro 4. Do you have to request access to use this repeater? When you use the repeater can anyone hear your conversations? I notice the radio has CTCSS and DCS codes. What do those mean?

 

Sorry for all the questions. My first time getting into GMRS. Have a few friends that are HAM operators and hope to study for that soon. :-)



#7 mbrun

mbrun

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 87 posts
  • GMRS Callsign:WRHS965

Posted 11 September 2020 - 08:34 PM

Hello Danny. Congratulations on getting your license.

I too am a KG-805G user.

It is good etiquette to obtain permission of the repeater owner to use it, particularly when the repeater is listed in database like MyGMRS as private, permission required or a fee is involved. If it is advertised as open, and the code is published on a web site like myGMRS, it would seem that the owner is implying public permission to use.

Yes everyone can hear your conversations when using a repeater. Everyone with a 22 channel FRS radio, a GMRS radio, a UHF scanner or a UHF ham radio can listen to the conversation. And, if the repeater is connected to the internet, people may be able to listen to it using an app on their phone or computer.

The CTCSS and DCS codes are tones or digital signals your radio sends while transmitting that receiving radios (including repeaters) can use to determine if they want to pay attention to or ignore your signal. A repeater uses this tone or code to determine whether it is going to rebroadcast your signal. Give it the right code and it will rebroadcast it. Give it the wrong code and it will ignore it.

Welcome to GMRS

Michael
WRHS965

So I just received my license earlier this week. I'm still trying to figure things out. I bought my first GMRS radio Wouxun 805G. I plan on buying another radio GMRS radio this weekend.
I will be using my radio to communicate with friends and family. My radio looks to be pre-programmed for the GMRS frequencies.

I see there is one repeater in the Twin Cities called Metro 4. Do you have to request access to use this repeater? When you use the repeater can anyone hear your conversations? I notice the radio has CTCSS and DCS codes. What do those mean?

Sorry for all the questions. My first time getting into GMRS. Have a few friends that are HAM operators and hope to study for that soon. :-)


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

#8 Danny

Danny

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 13 posts
  • LocationBloomington, MN
  • GMRS Callsign:WRJJ275

Posted 12 September 2020 - 02:20 PM

Thanks Michael. This information is helpful. 

 

I looked up local repeaters on mygmrs.com and see one here locally that says it covers 30 miles. It does say 'permission required' but when I click on it and read the notes it does say open system. I did go ahead and click request access and filled out that form. I will do that as it's best practice.

 

How do you know if you are hitting the repeater from the radio? When clicked the PTT button shouldn't you get some feedback from the repeater like HAM repeaters?

 

Do you use the stock antenna on your 805G?

 

I'm really looking forward to learning a lot about GMRS!

 

 

 

Hello Danny. Congratulations on getting your license.

I too am a KG-805G user.

It is good etiquette to obtain permission of the repeater owner to use it, particularly when the repeater is listed in database like MyGMRS as private, permission required or a fee is involved. If it is advertised as open, and the code is published on a web site like myGMRS, it would seem that the owner is implying public permission to use.

Yes everyone can hear your conversations when using a repeater. Everyone with a 22 channel FRS radio, a GMRS radio, a UHF scanner or a UHF ham radio can listen to the conversation. And, if the repeater is connected to the internet, people may be able to listen to it using an app on their phone or computer.

The CTCSS and DCS codes are tones or digital signals your radio sends while transmitting that receiving radios (including repeaters) can use to determine if they want to pay attention to or ignore your signal. A repeater uses this tone or code to determine whether it is going to rebroadcast your signal. Give it the right code and it will rebroadcast it. Give it the wrong code and it will ignore it.

Welcome to GMRS

Michael
WRHS965


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk



#9 mbrun

mbrun

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 87 posts
  • GMRS Callsign:WRHS965

Posted 12 September 2020 - 04:20 PM

Danny,

Yes, you would know you hit (and opened) the repeater if when you release the PTT you hear squelch tail from the repeater. Around me the tails seem to vary from 1/2-2 seconds, but always enough to know that I triggered it.

I have limited ability to hit a repeater from my home with the HT. I have two repeaters that I can break squelch on, but most days my level into the repeater is less than usable. If I put the HT in the car and use the mobile antenna, then I can get it sufficiently to hold a conversation. Repeaters are about 20-26 miles away.

Early on I was not sure if I was configured right, so I drove much closer to where I believed repeaters to be, made sure I could break squelch on it, opened a conversation and then drove towards home. This gave me as sense of coverage in my direction. Getting close gave the opportunity to change radio settings while in close proximity so I could rule out signal strength.

As far as antennas, I have a bunch. For direct mount I have the Nagoya 771g and 701g, and the factory supplied one. I have been using the 771g when I take my daily walks because it give me just a tad more range. Maybe 5 percent more? Once I get my base antenna permanently installed at the home, I image I will drop down to the 701G on the HT in-order to loose some of the whip length of the 771.

Michael
WRSH965


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

#10 Danny

Danny

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 13 posts
  • LocationBloomington, MN
  • GMRS Callsign:WRJJ275

Posted 12 September 2020 - 09:13 PM

I must not be in range of the repeater as I can't seem to hit it. I've been scanning all channels and never hear any talk as well. 

 

I went and ordered the Nagoya 771g from Amazon. Will see if that improves the reception. 

 

What do you suggest for base and mobile antennas?

 

Danny,

Yes, you would know you hit (and opened) the repeater if when you release the PTT you hear squelch tail from the repeater. Around me the tails seem to vary from 1/2-2 seconds, but always enough to know that I triggered it.

I have limited ability to hit a repeater from my home with the HT. I have two repeaters that I can break squelch on, but most days my level into the repeater is less than usable. If I put the HT in the car and use the mobile antenna, then I can get it sufficiently to hold a conversation. Repeaters are about 20-26 miles away.

Early on I was not sure if I was configured right, so I drove much closer to where I believed repeaters to be, made sure I could break squelch on it, opened a conversation and then drove towards home. This gave me as sense of coverage in my direction. Getting close gave the opportunity to change radio settings while in close proximity so I could rule out signal strength.

As far as antennas, I have a bunch. For direct mount I have the Nagoya 771g and 701g, and the factory supplied one. I have been using the 771g when I take my daily walks because it give me just a tad more range. Maybe 5 percent more? Once I get my base antenna permanently installed at the home, I image I will drop down to the 701G on the HT in-order to loose some of the whip length of the 771.

Michael
WRSH965


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk



#11 scubadude85

scubadude85

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 18 posts
  • GMRS Callsign:WRFU598

Posted 12 September 2020 - 10:10 PM

from my experience repeaters dont work. i ask for permission never get a replay and the open ones that i am with in 20 feet of i never get any anything from. i travel all over the usa with my radios and i cant call out or receive anything 2 days ago i could see the open repeaters and got nothing.



#12 berkinet

berkinet

    Senior expert on absolutely nothing

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 716 posts
  • GMRS Callsign:WQYR510
  • Ham Callsign:WB6TAE

Posted 13 September 2020 - 04:14 AM

from my experience repeaters dont work. i ask for permission never get a replay and the open ones that i am with in 20 feet of i never get any anything from. i travel all over the usa with my radios and i cant call out or receive anything 2 days ago i could see the open repeaters and got nothing.

 
There are, unfortunately, several listings in the repeater guide that for various reasons are not operating. But, is it possible the problem is with the way you have your radio(s) configured? In a previous post, you wrote

I think all my radios will not work. I have Cobra CXT1095-FLT, Zastone X6 Icom IC-F4001

 

The Cobra is not repeater capable. However, both the Zastone and Icom radios should work just fine. The issue is those are not specifically GMRS radios. They are general purpose UHF radios that must be properly configured to operate with a GMRS repeater.  The Zastone can be configured with CHIRP. The Icom requires custom software. I believe the version you want is ICOM CSF3001 PROGRAMMING SOFTWARE. A Google search will turn up a few purchase options.  Then, for both radios you will need the correct programming cable.

 

Once you have everything together, you should be able to program the radios and access a repeater. Just remember, the Transmit frequency is always 5mHz higher than the receive frequency. For example: Transmit on 467.5500 mHz and receive on 462.5500 mHz. If the repeater requires a tone (digital or analog) to operate, you need to set that under your transmit settings. To get started, you do not need to enter a receive tone, you can set that later after you have everything else working.

 

If you need help with a specific repeater you can post to the Private Discussion forum and include the frequency and tone information.


  • gman1971 likes this

Everything we hear is an opinion, not a fact. Everything we see is a perspective, not the truth.

-- Marcus Aurelius


#13 mbrun

mbrun

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 87 posts
  • GMRS Callsign:WRHS965

Posted 13 September 2020 - 06:53 AM

I purchased a Comet 712EFC 9dBi commercial antenna that I will be putting on my house. The narrower vertical pattern of this antenna is appropriate for me given that the land around me is mostly flat for miles and my elevation is on par with the highest in the area. The measured SWR is better than manufacturer’s spec. No complaints at this time.

I have an Midland MXTA-26 6dBi installed on my car and use it with the handheld. SWR measured SWR is better than manufacture spec. I have verified that it improves range when compared to all of the rubber ducks I have. I have, on multiple occasions now, worked the Cincinnati 700 repeater while driving between Cincinnati and Dayton on I-75. Best performance so far was about 38 miles with uninterrupted conversation the whole way.

I also have a DIY 1/4-wave ground plane antenna and an Ed-Fong roll-up J-pole. Currently I use the Ed-Fong antenna indoors hooked up to my HT. Once the Comet gets installed, it will be used for camping and other outdoor events.

I have had a few weekends where I have experimented with the antennas at my home. From there, I can break squelch on two repeaters with the HT and rubber duck alone, but usually with no usable audio. So clearly I am at the edge. As I switch through all the antennas (rubber ducks, the mobile, Ed-Fong, ground plane, and comet) I get in better and better according to the folks I radio tested with. Since I get in the best with the comet, clearly that extra gain is helpful. Even then, I still need to find an economical way to get the antenna high so I can hit the repeater solid and improve local simplex coverage which is a very small fraction of what I can get with the repeaters.

Michael
WRSH965


I must not be in range of the repeater as I can't seem to hit it. I've been scanning all channels and never hear any talk as well.

I went and ordered the Nagoya 771g from Amazon. Will see if that improves the reception.

What do you suggest for base and mobile antennas?



Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

#14 Danny

Danny

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 13 posts
  • LocationBloomington, MN
  • GMRS Callsign:WRJJ275

Posted 13 September 2020 - 02:44 PM

Thanks I'll look into those antennas.

 

Am I configuring this correct on KG -805G for this repeater?

 

Output: 462.650 MHz   141.3 Hz
Input: 467.650 MHz   141.3 Hz
 
I went to RPT19, click menu and go to R-CTC and set it for 141.3 and also T-CTC and set for 141.3

 

 

I purchased a Comet 712EFC 9dBi commercial antenna that I will be putting on my house. The narrower vertical pattern of this antenna is appropriate for me given that the land around me is mostly flat for miles and my elevation is on par with the highest in the area. The measured SWR is better than manufacturer’s spec. No complaints at this time.

I have an Midland MXTA-26 6dBi installed on my car and use it with the handheld. SWR measured SWR is better than manufacture spec. I have verified that it improves range when compared to all of the rubber ducks I have. I have, on multiple occasions now, worked the Cincinnati 700 repeater while driving between Cincinnati and Dayton on I-75. Best performance so far was about 38 miles with uninterrupted conversation the whole way.

I also have a DIY 1/4-wave ground plane antenna and an Ed-Fong roll-up J-pole. Currently I use the Ed-Fong antenna indoors hooked up to my HT. Once the Comet gets installed, it will be used for camping and other outdoor events.

I have had a few weekends where I have experimented with the antennas at my home. From there, I can break squelch on two repeaters with the HT and rubber duck alone, but usually with no usable audio. So clearly I am at the edge. As I switch through all the antennas (rubber ducks, the mobile, Ed-Fong, ground plane, and comet) I get in better and better according to the folks I radio tested with. Since I get in the best with the comet, clearly that extra gain is helpful. Even then, I still need to find an economical way to get the antenna high so I can hit the repeater solid and improve local simplex coverage which is a very small fraction of what I can get with the repeaters.

Michael
WRSH965




Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk



#15 mbrun

mbrun

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 87 posts
  • GMRS Callsign:WRHS965

Posted 13 September 2020 - 03:06 PM

You seem to have it backwards.

For GMRS, the operating radio (your radio) receive frequency is always the lower of the two frequencies. So an HT configured for repeater will use the lower frequency to listen on, the higher frequency to transmit on. (This is what is called a positive offset) The repeater then does just the opposite. It listens on the higher frequency and transmits on the lower.

If you are using the factory software for this radio, the listen frequency is the always the first frequency the software requires you to enter. Once you have a listen frequency, for simplex operation you enter the same frequency again or, for repeater operation, you enter the frequency 5MHz higher than your listen frequency.

Thanks I'll look into those antennas.

Am I configuring this correct on KG -805G for this repeater?

Output: 462.650 MHz 141.3 Hz
Input: 467.650 MHz 141.3 Hz

I went to RPT19, click menu and go to R-CTC and set it for 141.3 and also T-CTC and set for 141.3



Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

#16 berkinet

berkinet

    Senior expert on absolutely nothing

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 716 posts
  • GMRS Callsign:WQYR510
  • Ham Callsign:WB6TAE

Posted 13 September 2020 - 03:14 PM

You seem to have it backwards.

For GMRS, the operating radio (your radio) receive frequency is always the lower of the two frequencies. ...

True. One way to remember this is the transmit frequency will always start with 467. and the receive frequency will always start with 462.. And, the last 3 digits will always be the same. Eg. Transmit 467.550, receive 462.550.

Everything we hear is an opinion, not a fact. Everything we see is a perspective, not the truth.

-- Marcus Aurelius


#17 Danny

Danny

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 13 posts
  • LocationBloomington, MN
  • GMRS Callsign:WRJJ275

Posted 13 September 2020 - 03:23 PM

I'm doing all this on the radio. Not using external software. 

 

When I look at the owners manual I see RPT19 as freq 462.650. I don't see any channels with 467.650. Am I doing this wrong? Would you mind if you can tell me the steps to configure that repeater on this radio?

 

Those freq are for a local repeater on mygmrs repeater map.

 

You seem to have it backwards.

For GMRS, the operating radio (your radio) receive frequency is always the lower of the two frequencies. So an HT configured for repeater will use the lower frequency to listen on, the higher frequency to transmit on. (This is what is called a positive offset) The repeater then does just the opposite. It listens on the higher frequency and transmits on the lower.

If you are using the factory software for this radio, the listen frequency is the always the first frequency the software requires you to enter. Once you have a listen frequency, for simplex operation you enter the same frequency again or, for repeater operation, you enter the frequency 5MHz higher than your listen frequency.



Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk



#18 mbrun

mbrun

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 87 posts
  • GMRS Callsign:WRHS965

Posted 13 September 2020 - 04:05 PM

Danny,

On an official GMRS radio you generally only see the receive frequency. For GMRS, the companion Tx frequency for repeater operation is always a standard (and FCC mandated) +5MHz above the Rx frequency.

However, when using software, the software may require you to enter the correct Tx frequency.

Michael
WRHS965


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

#19 Danny

Danny

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 13 posts
  • LocationBloomington, MN
  • GMRS Callsign:WRJJ275

Posted 13 September 2020 - 07:05 PM

Thanks Michael.

 

Sorry for asking so many questions. 

 

It sounds like I my radio only see's the receiving freq. So I am doing it correctly?

Danny,

On an official GMRS radio you generally only see the receive frequency. For GMRS, the companion Tx frequency for repeater operation is always a standard (and FCC mandated) +5MHz above the Rx frequency.

However, when using software, the software may require you to enter the correct Tx frequency.

Michael
WRHS965


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk



#20 mbrun

mbrun

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 87 posts
  • GMRS Callsign:WRHS965

Posted 13 September 2020 - 08:42 PM

Sorry Dan, I don’t believe I understand your last question.

Here are a couple of videos on the KG-805G that might prove helpful. If you have not watched these already, do so and they may provide further insight.

https://youtu.be/0JqBehmDiyA
https://youtu.be/-d5oDWyP3wE

Regarding Frequency, the KG-805G always and only displays the Rx frequency. Regardless of whether you are in repeater mode or not. When the radio is in repeater mode you will see a +- icon on the display. That is your way of knowing you are on a channel memory configured for repeater use.

One thing I can tell you about the KG-805G is that you cannot add frequencies into memory without software if that is what you are trying to do. You can only change between memory locations that have the frequencies already stored in them.

The KG-805G comes pre-programmed with 22 simplex frequencies in memories 1-22, and the 8 repeater frequency pairs programmed into memories 23-30. To use the radio with a repeater you need to do the following:
1) Learn the frequency of the repeater you want to connect to, then select that frequency on your radio (typically memory between 23-30).
2) Learn the CTCSS or DCS code required to connect to the repeater and enter it into the radio under the T-CTC or T-DCS menu option associate with that memory location.
3) Learn the CTCSS or DCS code required to open the squelch on your radio and enter that too into the R-CTC or R-DCS menu option for your memory location.
4) Make sure you are in good radio range of the working repeater, then press PTT and announce your call sign. If the Green light on the radio comes immediately after you release your PTT button that is a great indication you have connected to the repeater.

I hope this helps.

Michael
WRHS965

Thanks Michael.

Sorry for asking so many questions.

It sounds like I my radio only see's the receiving freq. So I am doing it correctly?



Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk



Reply to this topic



  


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users