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To Split or not to Split… Tones? That is the question.


djxs
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Hi all! I’m on a mission to fully understand what split tones are. I know there are many here with the knowledge that I am seeking. 
 

1. What are Split Tones?

2. Are split tones only used while working with a repeater?

3. Is “Split Toning” for everyone?

4. What are the benefits of split tones?

 

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Split tones means there are different tones used for transmit and receive. It is one method of keeping the use of a repeater down as some radios are not capable of transmitting one tone to trigger the repeater receiver and another tone to unlock your receiver.

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I'll continue.

Split tones are for everyone! As long as your equipment allows to use them.
Benefits are abundant! Well, for the repeater owners. They can keep people with wrong equipment, or without the right knowledge, off the repeater. Low plank to pass, but nevertheless, filters problematic audience. It also challenges a _very_ problematic audience, they take it as a personal affront and make themselves a bigger problem.

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 Is “Split Toning” for everyone?

4. What are the benefits of split tones?


Sure if it works for you. Me? I was running split tones for a good wile, do to guys 50+ miles away claiming my system was interfering with theirs..., But all is did was allow me to make sure my TX's were not on the same PLs as theirs and that the 50w mobiles were not keying the other system.. I have since moved away to help with radio compatibility. A large handful of radios lack the ability to do them, especially some of the basic GMRS radios. I'm currently running a DTS and it has allowed a larger group of users to access my system.

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Split tones are just as described above. Unless it is DCS, which is really not a tone, it's a digital code. Those codes can run normal polarity (N) or, reverse polarity (R) on either transmit or, receive. We have a repeater in Phoenix that runs split DCS,  (programing = CROSS, 071N, 225N, CROSS -> CROSS) as well as travel tone. The DCS (or DTCS as it may be referred to when programing) is used for normal everyday traffic and, as a means of keeping the repeater private for members only. The travel tone is programed into a separate channel (same repeater frequencies) in the radio and used for weekly nets, another set of tones is for tactical (emergency services), and so on. This way, members that don't want to listen to the net can stay on their "home" channel with the DCS, and not hear the net traffic.

Radios that are capable of using distinct, different, DCS codes are not that easy to find. Most times you have to ask the manufacturer the specific question. That said, most commercial radios (part 90), should be able to handle it. The Baofeng UV82C is one such handheld.

Hope this helps!

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