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New to Radioddity DB25-G GMRS Mobile Radio 25W


Lifegood
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33 minutes ago, Lifegood said:

Hello all, I'm very new to the GMRS mobile radios and I just purchase a DB25-G radio.

I would like to installed it on my vehicle without drilling holes, and to use it as a base.

Can you recommend a good antenna and what I would need to attach it to my vehicle.

Well, without knowing what type of vehicle you're wanting to add a radio to, and without drilling holes, your best bet is most likely a magnet mount antenna. Unless your vehicle uses non-metallic or aluminum body panels, a magnet mount should work on it. There are tons of choices out there, but it seems that there is a trend toward antennas using an NMO mount. There are magnetic bases with NMO mounts, to which you add an NMO antenna tuned for the UHF 460-470 MHz band, and they would serve you very well for GMRS.

A second option for an antenna that does not require drilling into your vehicle is a roof rack or mirror mount antenna, which basically clamps to a metal bar of some sort on the exterior of the vehicle. Of course this option requires that you have something suitable to clamp to, but it could prevent you from needing to drill into the vehicle.

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3 hours ago, Lifegood said:

Hello all, I'm very new to the GMRS mobile radios

Hello and welcome, Lifegood. I'm new here and to GMRS, as well, so I though I'd chime in. Everyone I've met and shared with has been very helpful, so I'd say you're in the right spot. As I said I'm new so my knowledge, all things GMRS, is limited. I currently have a mag mount sitting on my hood, ran the wire around the inside of the engine compartment to stretch it out and into the firewall. I'm not sure I needed to stretch it out like that, but back when I installed my cb, I was instructed to not coil my cable, figured it was the same concept. 

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2 hours ago, Lifegood said:

Thanks very much WyoJoe. Sorry about not mentioning what type of vehicle i have a 2016 ford f150 truck.

This radio is a UHF/VHF would that matter what type of antenna I need.

Your antenna choice would depend on your planned usage for the radio. I believe you said your radio is the DB-25G model, which is a GMRS (transmit & receive) radio with UHF/VHF receive capability. If so, I would recommend a dual band antenna, but with the tuning optimized for GMRS frequencies by shortening the antenna a little bit. That way your antenna is optimized for the frequencies on which you transmit, but should still work to receive other frequencies.

Other that some handheld transceivers I have, I don't generally use the same radio for GMRS as I do for ham 2m/70cm bands, so I have separate antennas for each. I am using a Laird UHF antenna in my truck for GMRS. It's similar to the MXTA26 Midland GMRS antenna that I've seen mentioned on this forum quite often. Unfortunately, I don't know how well they receive on VHF frequencies, in case that matters to you.

I will let others chime in about their recommendations for antennas, as I know there are others on this forum that use theirs the way you intend to use yours.

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6 hours ago, Lifegood said:

Thanks very much WyoJoe. Sorry about not mentioning what type of vehicle i have a 2016 ford f150 truck.

This radio is a UHF/VHF would that matter what type of antenna I need.

While it'd be a lie to say the tuning has no effect, I'm confident a gmrs tuned antenna will receive just fine on vhf & uhf.  I have a Midland 5/8 wave whip behind a btech 50x1 for my gmrs base setup, and receive 70cm and 2m (public safety, a couple repeaters, and calling frequency). One repeater in 70cm actually comes in better on that than the comet gp1 for my ham setup.

I recently changed out the browning 5/8 over 5/8 on the truck for something a little shorter, though it'd probably be a great length for a hood lip/fender mount/stake hole mount, at around 33". In its place now is a 5/8 wave, ~12" laird tuned for 70cm (a hair longer than that Midland above), that should present less clearance issues since I have the mag mount on top of the cab, though I also have laird 1/4 waves for 70cm and gmrs.

My mobile setup covers gmrs and 70cm...the browning covers both nicely, I don't have as high hopes for the 70cm lairds. I've heard good things about the comet 2x4sr for wide usability, and it's close in length to the browning; have one on the shelf, but waiting till I get some 2m capability beyond a handheld in the truck to put it to use.

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11 hours ago, WyoJoe said:

Your antenna choice would depend on your planned usage for the radio. I believe you said your radio is the DB-25G model, which is a GMRS (transmit & receive) radio with UHF/VHF receive capability. If so, I would recommend a dual band antenna, but with the tuning optimized for GMRS frequencies by shortening the antenna a little bit. That way your antenna is optimized for the frequencies on which you transmit, but should still work to receive other frequencies.

Other that some handheld transceivers I have, I don't generally use the same radio for GMRS as I do for ham 2m/70cm bands, so I have separate antennas for each. I am using a Laird UHF antenna in my truck for GMRS. It's similar to the MXTA26 Midland GMRS antenna that I've seen mentioned on this forum quite often. Unfortunately, I don't know how well they receive on VHF frequencies, in case that matters to you.

I will let others chime in about their recommendations for antennas, as I know there are others on this forum that use theirs the way you intend to use yours.

If the radio is GMRS transmit only I wouldn't buy a dual band antenna but one for GMRS. You can receive on almost anything as an antenna.

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1 hour ago, BoxCar said:

If the radio is GMRS transmit only I wouldn't buy a dual band antenna but one for GMRS. You can receive on almost anything as an antenna.

Be sure to give him your phone number, so that when he drives just outside the receiving range of a NOAA station and can't pull it in with his UHF-only antenna, he can call you for the emergency weather reports!!

Oh, wait: if he can't receive NOAA, he'll not get cell coverage either!  He's up the creek without a paddle, but at least he saved $4! 🤣

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2 hours ago, WRHS218 said:

I have a Tram 1126B 1/4 wave UHF antenna (410-490MHz) on my vehicle and I receive the NOAA weather channels just fine. 162.400 is the only one I can get on any radio in my location, however when I travel I can receive multiple NOAA channels with this antenna, YMMV.

That’s great news!! … for YOU!

you can also give Lifegood emergency weather reports when he is driving in an area that his UHF only antenna can’t receive them!

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Michael, receiver antennas don't need tuning as they are all band from one quarter inch stubs to mile long wires. Yes, the length matters in that a longer wire is more sensitive; but length doesn't affect the frequency range. You can prove this to yourself by using a simple piece of coat hanger or any wire connected to your radio and listening to the various stations on different bands.

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2 hours ago, BoxCar said:

Michael, receiver antennas don't need tuning as they are all band from one quarter inch stubs to mile long wires. Yes, the length matters in that a longer wire is more sensitive; but length doesn't affect the frequency range. You can prove this to yourself by using a simple piece of coat hanger or any wire connected to your radio and listening to the various stations on different bands.

Cite the source of your statement please

Quote

Antenna gain indicates how strong a signal an antenna can send or receive in a specified direction. Gain is calculated by comparing the measured power transmitted or received by the antenna in a specific direction to the power transmitted or received by a hypothetical ideal antenna in the same situation.

Understanding Antenna Gain (emphasis added)

So when he is in a fringe area and is just beyond the capability of his UHF antenna to receive a NOAA transmission, maybe he can connect a coat hanger to his radio to gain access to emergency weather broadcasts...

AND don't even think about transmitting with a MURS HT connected to your UHF only antenna.

BUT yes, he will save $4! (Actually there are dual-band antennas that are less expensive than single band, UHF antennas).

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On 9/21/2021 at 5:50 PM, Lifegood said:

Hello all, I'm very new to the GMRS mobile radios and I just purchase a DB25-G radio.

I would like to installed it on my vehicle without drilling holes, and to use it as a base.

Can you recommend a good antenna and what I would need to attach it to my vehicle.

Getting back to the topic at hand...

Does this Cup-Holder Mount work for you?  It works with my Anytone AT-779UV a/k/a Radioddity DB-20G:

Cup Holder for Anytone

I use the $20 LGR dual-band mag-mount from Lets Get Ready

Anytone AT-779UV.jpg

Screen Shot 2021-09-22 at 5.49.04 AM.png

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On 9/23/2021 at 12:15 PM, MichaelLAX said:

Cite the source of your statement please

Understanding Antenna Gain (emphasis added)

So when he is in a fringe area and is just beyond the capability of his UHF antenna to receive a NOAA transmission, maybe he can connect a coat hanger to his radio to gain access to emergency weather broadcasts...

AND don't even think about transmitting with a MURS HT connected to your UHF only antenna.

BUT yes, he will save $4! (Actually there are dual-band antennas that are less expensive than single band, UHF antennas).

I use a Midland GMRS antenna and have had little trouble getting NOAA broadcasts in remote areas when I need them.  I wouldn't give that much consideration unless NOAA was a priority.

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On 9/26/2021 at 6:35 AM, DanW said:

I use a Midland GMRS antenna and have had little trouble getting NOAA broadcasts in remote areas when I need them.  I wouldn't give that much consideration unless NOAA was a priority.

To bring this particular discussion back to focus:

NOAA was an anecdotal example on my part why it is better to purchase a dual-band antenna.

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I will add that I think you gave sage advice if cost/gmrs performance are the same or similar.  Then why not go dual band?  

But one nice thing about a GMRS antenna is that I never had to mess with SWR.  It was good right out of the box.  Not sure that would be the case with dual band.

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I got the same radio and use a trunk mounted antenna. All I can get at the moment in NOAA broadcasts and the clips of some conversations but I am at least 100 miles from the nearest repeater. I mounted the unit using double sided Gorilla Tape on my dash in my Jeep Latitude. It works but still after two weeks need to have a contact so I can check my output signal.

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