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New Part95E Radio


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Thanks for posting. I knew this radio was coming but did not know it was going to be ready to ship this soon. Just in time for the holidays.

 

Sure is a shame that Midland was not the company introducing a radio with such a feature set.

 

I just downloaded and perused the manual. This one appears to be written (or at least well edited) by a person that speaks english natively. Reads like one might expect a manual to read. I wonder if it perhaps was written by the BTW staff.

 

Looks like it includes the same plug-n-play repeater support that exists for some of their KG-UV900 series radios. That I imagine is going to be quite popular with the MyGMRS group.

 

One thing I think may be an issues is the frequency stability. It seems low compared to current FCC regs. That will need to be verified.

 

Michael

WRHS965

KE8PLM

 

 

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and if it only was the frequency stability issue.... what are people expecting here? an APX8000 level of frequency stability with an APX8000 grade receiver? 

 

Lets face it: its just another piece of overpriced CCR garbage. There is plenty of high quality Moto/Icom/Vertex/Kenwood gear available on places like eBay that will be far better than that. 

 

But, its your money, waste it accordingly.

 

G.

 

 

Thanks for posting. I knew this radio was coming but did not know it was going to be ready to ship this soon. Just in time for the holidays.

Sure is a shame that Midland was not the company introducing a radio with such a feature set.

I just downloaded and perused the manual. This one appears to be written (or at least well edited) by a person that speaks english natively. Reads like one might expect a manual to read. I wonder if it perhaps was written by the BTW staff.

Looks like it includes the same plug-n-play repeater support that exists for some of their KG-UV900 series radios. That I imagine is going to be quite popular with the MyGMRS group.

One thing I think may be an issues is the frequency stability. It seems low compared to current FCC regs. That will need to be verified.

Michael
WRHS965
KE8PLM


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"Wouxun says the KG-1000G is built using a "classic radio circuit", but what they mean to do is differentiate their products from many lower quality radios being built today. Often radios are built using "radio-on-a-chip" technology that makes them inexpensive to produce, but often inferior in sound quality and receive sensitivity. The KG-1000G is a "real" radio, with a superheterodyne receiver, built in the same way as expensive professional radios made by large manufacturers."

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One nice thing about it is that it has a detachable faceplate that can be mounted remotely. You can mount the radio itself under a seat, or in the trunk, and mount the faceplate on the dash or some other easily accessible place. For people who cannot mount a full sized radio in their car easily, it is a nice option. 

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and if it only was the frequency stability issue.... what are people expecting here? an APX8000 level of frequency stability with an APX8000 grade receiver? 

 

Lets face it: its just another piece of overpriced CCR garbage. There is plenty of high quality Moto/Icom/Vertex/Kenwood gear available on places like eBay that will be far better than that. 

 

But, its your money, waste it accordingly.

 

G.

You are making generalizations you can't back up with actual measurements to claim the new WOXUN is a further example of a CCR. There are a number of Moto radios that fall in the same category of cheap Chinese radios as Moto's Schaumburg facility has been reduced to primarily office space. I don't think Moto even builds a radio in the US anymore.

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How far can you run a jumper cable from the radio to the face plate on one of these detachable face plates? I would love to put my antenna up higher on my hill but I would have to run way to much coax down to get it into my house and deal with all that line loss. Could I just put the radio up there in a shed and run the faceplate down to the house on a roll of data cable?

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EDIT:

I understand, it would be nice if someone here who owns this radio performed an actual ISO-tee test on the device connected to a 1/4 wave mobile, a 5/8 mobile, and a base antenna just to get actual effective sensitivity measurements.

 

G.

 

 

The Wouxun being discussed here is not a CCR radio.

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Pretty high premium for a detachable face and receiving UHF outside of GMRS.  I thought the Midland was expensive at $250 and $300.  The Midland MDX400 can also be programmed to receive UHF outside of GMRS, so all this really gives is the detachable face.  

The above not withstanding, excellent market timing, they will sell like hotcakes. 

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Pretty high premium for a detachable face and receiving UHF outside of GMRS.  I thought the Midland was expensive at $250 and $300.  The Midland MDX400 can also be programmed to receive UHF outside of GMRS, so all this really gives is the detachable face.  

 

The above not withstanding, excellent market timing, they will sell like hotcakes. 

 

 

Somebody will surely buy them. But yeah - not worth the price just to get a detachable face - IMO.

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From my reading all I could find.

Its based on the KG-980UV Quad band. Based on KG-950UV Quad. Based on the KG-920UV Dual.

A true dual transceiver with Left/Right split design with dual speakers even.

Uses SuperHet receivers.

GMRS/UHF band side is being pushed up to 50W from the 40W UHF on the KG-980UV.

Two KG-1000G can be used as a GMRS 50W repeater set.

Listing for $320 only $10 more than the $310 for the KG-980UV.

 

IMHO much better package then the MXT400.

I'd live to try it out, but I don't want to be first one too.

And as stated the MXT400 is over priced, so is this unit also?

I returned mine just shy of the 30 day return. Was much more useful with the programing software.

Also as stated, how far are you from a new or even use Jap/commercial unit.

 

But only testing will tell us.

 

Just my read and .02

 

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From my reading all I could find.

Its based on the KG-980UV Quad band. Based on KG-950UV Quad. Based on the KG-920UV Dual.

A true dual transceiver with Left/Right split design with dual speakers even.

Uses SuperHet receivers.

GMRS/UHF band side is being pushed up to 50W from the 40W UHF on the KG-980UV.

Two KG-1000G can be used as a GMRS 50W repeater set.

Listing for $320 only $10 more than the $310 for the KG-980UV.

 

IMHO much better package then the MXT400.

I'd live to try it out, but I don't want to be first one too.

And as stated the MXT400 is over priced, so is this unit also?

I returned mine just shy of the 30 day return. Was much more useful with the programing software.

Also as stated, how far are you from a new or even use Jap/commercial unit.

 

But only testing will tell us.

 

Just my read and .02

 

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Yup you would doing well to wait awhile for two reasons.

 

You don't want to be "Beta Testing" a version 1.0 radio. Let somebody else spend their money and deal with the problems. While that is going on just occasionally do a search for reviews and see how people are liking, or not, the radio before you spend your money.

 

The second is new radio designs typically sell at the top end of the range the model is targeted for. After 6 months to a year once the novelty wears off, competitors come out with similar models, the price will slowly drop. After some time the manufacture may try to drive sales by offing "manufacturer's discounts" on many of the more well know radio equipment vendor sites. Keep checking to see who is offering the best deal, no sale tax and maybe free shipping.

 

With the holiday season arrival you may find those vendors offering holiday specials. Pays to keep looking around.

 

I was given a free Wouxon KG-UVD1P at a local Ham radio swap. It looked new in the box but no charger. Cost me $17 to get one off of eBay. One of the things I do is look for PDF versions of the manuals, FCC grants and a service manual. Turns out this radio really had a service manual complete with a schematic. That proved interesting. If you are familiar with electronics the schematic can tell you a few things the radio spec's likely won't. 

 

In this case the radio was in fact a dual superheterodyne design. First IF was at 29.250MHz using 2 cascaded resonators and the second IF was the usual 455KHz.  However the bandwidth on the filters is not delectable so it will be fine on wide-band FM but too wide on narrow band, at least from the stand point of using closer spaced channels. Manufactures do this to save cost. To get narrow band operation the frequency deviation is reduced from 5KHz to 2.5KHz and the audio gain is doubled on receive.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Superheterodyne_receiver

 

 

By contrast the commercial radios I have use two sets of filters, one wide band and the other narrow band. One even has a "tracking filter" on the input to pre-filter out any potential interfering signals before they get to the IF stages.  These radios are designed to work in a very severe and crowded RF environment.  You likely won't find this in consumer grade or even Ham Radio grade radios.

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Much better way to put it than the typical gMan1971 this radio sucks...

 

Your last statement is pretty much defines what makes a radio work well. Superhets alone suffer from out of band interference, mainly due to intermodulation caused with the IF stages frequencies... at least without the presence of a decent front end. So, don't let the superhet buzzword get you...

 

G.

 

 

Yup you would doing well to wait awhile for two reasons.

 

You don't want to be "Beta Testing" a version 1.0 radio. Let somebody else spend their money and deal with the problems. While that is going on just occasionally do a search for reviews and see how people are liking, or not, the radio before you spend your money.

 

The second is new radio designs typically sell at the top end of the range the model is targeted for. After 6 months to a year once the novelty wears off, competitors come out with similar models, the price will slowly drop. After some time the manufacture may try to drive sales by offing "manufacturer's discounts" on many of the more well know radio equipment vendor sites. Keep checking to see who is offering the best deal, no sale tax and maybe free shipping.

 

With the holiday season arrival you may find those vendors offering holiday specials. Pays to keep looking around.

 

I was given a free Wouxon KG-UVD1P at a local Ham radio swap. It looked new in the box but no charger. Cost me $17 to get one off of eBay. One of the things I do is look for PDF versions of the manuals, FCC grants and a service manual. Turns out this radio really had a service manual complete with a schematic. That proved interesting. If you are familiar with electronics the schematic can tell you a few things the radio spec's likely won't. 

 

In this case the radio was in fact a dual superheterodyne design. First IF was at 29.250MHz using 2 cascaded resonators and the second IF was the usual 455KHz.  However the bandwidth on the filters is not delectable so it will be fine on wide-band FM but too wide on narrow band, at least from the stand point of using closer spaced channels. Manufactures do this to save cost. To get narrow band operation the frequency deviation is reduced from 5KHz to 2.5KHz and the audio gain is doubled on receive.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Superheterodyne_receiver

 

 

By contrast the commercial radios I have use two sets of filters, one wide band and the other narrow band. One even has a "tracking filter" on the input to pre-filter out any potential interfering signals before they get to the IF stages.  These radios are designed to work in a very severe and crowded RF environment.  You likely won't find this in consumer grade or even Ham Radio grade radios.

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According the US importer (BuyTwoWayRadios), they have confirmed that this radio will enforce FCC compliance by way of the firmware. This is a good liability reducing move on their part. This should mean that regardless of the means used by the owner to configure the radio (VFO, front panel, factory software or Chirp) the radio should function per the FCC technical requirements.

 

https://www.buytwowayradios.com/blog/2020/11/wouxun-kg-1000g-mobile-gmrs-radio.html

 

Prospective owners should also know immediately that the radio IS NOT (I say IS NOT) capable of transmitting and receiving on all GMRS frequencies like its hand held sibling the Wouxun KG-805G. Whereas the handheld can legally transmit on all 30 allotted GMRS frequencies this mobile radio can transmit only on only 23 of them. In this regard, this puts it in the same camp as the Midland GMRS mobile radios. This seems logical due to the fact that minimum power of this radio exceeds the allowed power for the GMRS/FRS interstitial channels 8-14 (those in the 467 MHz range). This is a non-issue for those that already understand the FCC rules but for the neophyte this may be met with anger and surprise should this be their first GMRS mobile rodeo (pun intended). The use of the term “30 Channel” in the ads is sadly misleading in this context. In some radio circles a channel refers to a specific frequency and the number of channels refers to the number of frequencies you can operate on. In other circles a channel merely refers to a memory location (preset) for storing a Rx and Tx frequency, squelch codes and other associated values which the user can conveniently recall.

 

So, in summary, this radio can only Tx on 23 GMRS frequencies but can receive on 30 GMRS frequencies according to current public information.

 

Edit 1: I re-reviewed the language in the FCC Regulations and found 95.1763 (d) “467 MHz interstitial channels. Only hand-held portable units may transmit on these 7 channels.” So here there is no gray area. Mobile, base and repeaters are not permitted to transmit on the 467 interstitial channels.

 

Michael

WRHS965

KE8PLM

 

 

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Gman1971, just give it up already.

 

Moderator's edit: "...I disagree"

 

Sorry moderators, ...but someone had to say it.

I notice Gman1971 is SELLING a lot of items... I guess it doesn't hurt to advertise for a yard sale. Is he giving up on GMRS or did he get a notice of noncompliance from the FCC? Just curious...

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I notice Gman1971 is SELLING a lot of items... I guess it doesn't hurt to advertise for a yard sale. Is he giving up on GMRS or did he get a notice of noncompliance from the FCC? Just curious...

The gist of his many posts was that he saw the light (so to speak) when he discovered that the premium brands of radios (e.g. Motorola and others) truly do substantially outperform all of the CCR he ever purchased and tested. He was trying to help all of us see the light also. It seems a logical decision to hold on to the high performing radios he found and sell the rest that don’t live up to expectations.

 

Michael

WRHS965

KE8PLM

 

 

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That is correct, mbrun... thank you.

 

Not giving up on GMRS.... why would I?  I am selling a lot of my radios b/c I want to consolidate, so all the XPR7550e and SL7550 radios that I've recently acquired... those stay, aka the new Motorolian Imperial Fleet. Also, a lot of the radios I am selling aren't really the lowest of the barrel I own either. For example, the EVX-539 is not a CCR by any stretch of the imagination, but the XPR7550e won the contest, for several reasons other than just better performance. For example, I can't deal with having 10 different codeplugs anymore, nor 10 different CPS, 10 different battery chargers, 10 different prog cables... etc. So everything non Motorola XPR gen2 will have to go at some point or another. I debated whether to keep the XPR6550s Gen1 radios, but I figured I might just sell them as well... maybe these can help others see the light the way they helped me see the light... 

 

Oh, and there is also two more Alinco MD5 DMR/FM radios up for grabs as well. I just forgot to put them on the "yard sale" post...  

 

G.

 

The gist of his many posts was that he saw the light (so to speak) when he discovered that the premium brands of radios (e.g. Motorola and others) truly do substantially outperform all of the CCR he ever purchased and tested. He was trying to help all of us see the light also. It seems a logical decision to hold on to the high performing radios he found and sell the rest that don’t live up to expectations.

Michael
WRHS965
KE8PLM


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