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New user, old radio question


Guest Scott Hein
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Guest Scott Hein

I am planning to upgrade the radios we use for communications when camping, offroading, and hiking and will be applying for a GMRS license shortly (I have to decide whether I can wait until the $35 license fee takes effect...).  We have been using a pair of ancient ICOM IC-4008A FRS radios for many years. My original plan was to keep these radios to hand to friends without a GMRS license.  However, in my research into the GMRS regulations I noticed that these older radios use a different set of channel frequencies than the current GMRS/FRS frequencies.  They transmit on 14-channels from 467.5125 to 467.6750 MHz all at 500 mW.  I have tried to find details on the web about these older FRS frequencies and have mostly come up empty.  So, my main question is whether these radios are even legal to use any more given that they transmit on some frequencies not specified for FRS in the current regs, including several on the GMRS repeater input frequencies.

 

Thanks,

-Scott 

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Welcome new user to the group.....  This is food for thought IMHO.  Research what brand of radio you want to get for the new FRS/GMRS channels and hold off getting your license.  It looks like it will be 30-60 more days for the $35 fee.  So while you are waiting test your older iCom with your new purchase of a pair of FRS/GMRS radios.  

 

It is my understanding that the new FRS go up to 2 watts.  I would let the kid play with the older iCom as they will be close, within eye sight which is the distant the .5 watt old iCom can go.  So if you lose one or two ok... I have 4 bubble wrap Cobra and just use them for the kids fun time (lost two already).  It almost like a wireless intercom in my house.

 

While you are waiting to save $35 you can scan or monitor the GMRS channels.  This will allow you to see what is going on while you can use it on FRS channels with your iComm.  I started back in Nov 2020 and thanks to many of the good guys and information on this site have helped me so I can help other newbies... don't worry if I say something incorrect, they will step in and gently help.  So the 3 month from my license I studying and asking question then got radio and been ready to go since Christmas.

 

Hope this helps you and others reading.  Remember whatever you pick is what is best for your needs, e.g. who know maybe your family dog will be on air... joking but know FCC all family members, I did not see anything saying no dogs or cats.

 

Jack  

 

P.S. I have attached our family radio channel setup...  It show the wattage for FRS and GMRS.  If you look up some of my post you will see what radio I picked and why, it all personal.

 

I am planning to upgrade the radios we use for communications when camping, offroading, and hiking and will be applying for a GMRS license shortly (I have to decide whether I can wait until the $35 license fee takes effect...).  We have been using a pair of ancient ICOM IC-4008A FRS radios for many years. My original plan was to keep these radios to hand to friends without a GMRS license.  However, in my research into the GMRS regulations I noticed that these older radios use a different set of channel frequencies than the current GMRS/FRS frequencies.  They transmit on 14-channels from 467.5125 to 467.6750 MHz all at 500 mW.  I have tried to find details on the web about these older FRS frequencies and have mostly come up empty.  So, my main question is whether these radios are even legal to use any more given that they transmit on some frequencies not specified for FRS in the current regs, including several on the GMRS repeater input frequencies.

 

Thanks,

-Scott 

FRS:GMRS Channels on our KG-805G.pdf

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Closing the loop on this now that I have my license (WRKL820) and have registered.  I picked up a pair of Midland GXT1000 radios on sale to get us started. They communicate just fine with the old ICOM FRS radios on channels 1-14 as WRAK968 suggested they would.  The manual I had downloaded for the IC-4008A must have been for a different geography (?) with all 14 frequencies listed in the 467.5125 to 467.6750 MHz range.  The GXT1000s should be just fine for our immediate needs - relatively short range simplex communication when hiking and camping.  In the meantime I will investigate what repeaters are available in the places we will be using the radios.  Once we decide we need repeater-capable radios (or need more power/range), we will have to decide if a handheld or vehicle mounted radio makes more sense for our use.

 

Thanks again for helping a newbie.

-Scott 

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