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NEW Midland MXT275 Wideband?


WROZ437
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I searched a new owners manual and the only reference to the word "band" was when discussing the weather bands.  I didn't see any reference to switching from narrow to wide band.  Not to say the radio could just come in wideband but I believe the MXT500 is switchable.

I'm just a newbie trying to find my way thru the GMRS life...  If I am wrong I do take education easily. 😃

 

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2 hours ago, WROZ437 said:

So I have a brand spanking new MXT275. It has the USB-C port on the radio so it is the latest version. Is this radio wideband or at least capable of being programmed via software? 

I would have sworn there was something on midland's site previously mentioning it.

That said, their authorization for the 275 DOES allow for it: https://apps.fcc.gov/oetcf/tcb/reports/Tcb731GrantForm.cfm?mode=COPY&RequestTimeout=500&tcb_code=&application_id=o9gcpY0BMlKQKr%2FMaUSLGQ%3D%3D&fcc_id=MMAMXT275

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8 hours ago, wayoverthere said:

I would have sworn there was something on midland's site previously mentioning it.

That said, their authorization for the 275 DOES allow for it: https://apps.fcc.gov/oetcf/tcb/reports/Tcb731GrantForm.cfm?mode=COPY&RequestTimeout=500&tcb_code=&application_id=o9gcpY0BMlKQKr%2FMaUSLGQ%3D%3D&fcc_id=MMAMXT275

I could swear I saw something about it, too. I was hoping one of the gurus on here had a quick answer. I will try and get in touch with their customer service and see what they have to say...

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Well at least Midland's Customer Service is quick and responsive. The only radios that accept any programming are the "premium" MXT400 and 500 units. Doesn't look like the 575 will be programmable, either, but at least that will have wideband baked in.

From Midland Customer Support:

Quote
No, the MXT275 doesn't have Wide Band capabilities and cannot be programmed through PC software. We only offer those features on our premium products like the MXT400 & MXT500. We will be launching the MXT575 which is a 50 Watt version of the MXT275 in a few months. The MXT575 wont' be programmable but will allow users to switch between Narrow & Wide band in the menu.
Are you intending to use radio in off-roading groups? If you are using them to communicate in off-roading groups with other Midland Products, the narrow band will provide optimum reception and sound, since all Midland products come standard a Narrow Band. Even on the MXT400, MXT500, and MXT575, they are defaulted to Narrow band and have to be switched to Wide Band.

 

I really want to like the 575 or even my 275 if I could expand it's capability a bit. I really like the clean installation of the integrated mic. *Sigh* Looks like I am going to have to figure out how to get a KG-1000G mounted cleanly in my truck...

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Just saw this thread and see you got your answer from Midland. Interesting response from them.

Back in March of 2021, I found a Midland radio offered for sale in Australia (Midland ML-80) which looks like an MXT275 with different firmware. This radio is programmable via software (only available through authorized dealers) and is capable of wide and narrow band emissions, so I emailed Midland USA to ask if the software was available for purchase, or if there was a US dealer that I could send my 275 to for wideband programming.

Here is the response I got from Midland, verbatim, which was not entirely clear to me. Possibly a typo on their part,

“Unfortunately the MXT275 is programmable to to wide band audio we do not have software for this radio.”

Clear as mud, but either way it can’t or won’t be done with the 275, and their response to you shows they do not care about serious GMRS users, as their market is the off-road community. 

I had purchased a 275 when they first came out (with the crappy microphone that had no audio...they did replace that for me), but the radio was unusable on my repeater (Motorola GR300) because the audio was so low (both from the narrow band emission, and just low audio output from the 275 in general).

It is solely my opinion, but I will not purchase any more Midland products, and feel a bit sad for those that think the newer radios are going to offer good value. I do not believe that will be the case. But on the plus side, it has driven me back to using old commercial radios (Motorola, Maxon, EFJ, Kenwood) radios, since I still have a 486 PC with Windows 3.1 and DOS 6.2 on it. Honestly, these 30+ year old radios still whoop any new Part 95e radio that the good folks in China are pumping out. 

 

 

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9 hours ago, WRAM370 said:

Just saw this thread and see you got your answer from Midland. Interesting response from them.

Back in March of 2021, I found a Midland radio offered for sale in Australia (Midland ML-80) which looks like an MXT275 with different firmware. This radio is programmable via software (only available through authorized dealers) and is capable of wide and narrow band emissions, so I emailed Midland USA to ask if the software was available for purchase, or if there was a US dealer that I could send my 275 to for wideband programming.

Here is the response I got from Midland, verbatim, which was not entirely clear to me. Possibly a typo on their part,

“Unfortunately the MXT275 is programmable to to wide band audio we do not have software for this radio.”

Clear as mud, but either way it can’t or won’t be done with the 275, and their response to you shows they do not care about serious GMRS users, as their market is the off-road community. 

I had purchased a 275 when they first came out (with the crappy microphone that had no audio...they did replace that for me), but the radio was unusable on my repeater (Motorola GR300) because the audio was so low (both from the narrow band emission, and just low audio output from the 275 in general).

It is solely my opinion, but I will not purchase any more Midland products, and feel a bit sad for those that think the newer radios are going to offer good value. I do not believe that will be the case. But on the plus side, it has driven me back to using old commercial radios (Motorola, Maxon, EFJ, Kenwood) radios, since I still have a 486 PC with Windows 3.1 and DOS 6.2 on it. Honestly, these 30+ year old radios still whoop any new Part 95e radio that the good folks in China are pumping out. 

 

 

It’s pretty sad. I am new to all of this so I am just figuring it all out. My primary use will be in my Jeep so obviously Midland came up when looking at Jeep centric websites prior to making a purchase. I ordered a 275 and didn’t think much of it. When the unit showed up on my doorstep I did some googling and watched a few videos to get some ideas on how to install the radio cleanly in my Jeep. It was through that secondary research that I learned of myGMRS and started going down the rabbit hole.

I mentioned I got a GMRS radio for my Jeep. Honestly, the 275 will be fine for it’s intended use. That said, as with most of us on this forum, I got bit by the bug a little. When I learned about things like wide v narrow band, repeater tones, etc. I realized the 275 fell short compared to most other mobile radios. What really irritates me is that according to Zak, the product manager at Midland, the forthcoming MXT575 isn’t considered a premium product offering. Seriously!? It’s got a $400 price tag! The KG-1000G is less money and does far more! So I am stuck in a weird spot. I am not (yet) a full on radio geek but I do want to get the most out of my GMRS setup. The minimum acceptable feature set for me would be the MXT500, as I could program channels 8-14 with repeater tones. Even with my fairly casual use, I could see myself needing more than 7 channels for that purpose, though.

Honestly the one feature that Midland offers which I find very, very appealing is the integrated mic. I was able to get the 275 installed really cleanly in my Jeep. I am not a fan of cables and wires running across the dash, etc. My 275 has a what I think is a defective mic. The screen is very hard to read from straight on and impossible to read at an angle from the top of the mic, like when its hanging from my dash, for example. Midland was very responsive and sent another mic right away but it was DOA. It won’t even turn on or light up at all. So this is frustrating. As previously mentioned, when I upgrade to a more powerful radio, I will have to forego the integrated mic to get more advanced features. If I am losing the ability to bury the radio in the glovebox then I have several options for fully featured mobile radios, all of which are cheaper than the Midland MXT500. 

I guess this highlights the irony of the situation. Amongst crowds that are looking for simple, reliable comms - you know, the whole point of GMRS - Midland is the recognized brand, at least amongst non-radio enthusiasts. They know how to market their products. They appear to be a consumer version (affordable) of something like the Kenwood or Motorola radios. That said, quality control and feature development seems to be severely lacking. That really makes the price tags of the new MXT500 and forthcoming 575 hard to swallow. 

I really want to like Midland. I really really do. As I previously mentioned, the integrated mic is a game changer for me. I like simple interfaces. I can appreciate how Midland has positioned themselves in the market. I don’t fault them for that. I think they have just dumbed it down too much. 

 

 

 

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I also wanted to like the Midland MXT275, because it was going into my wife’s car, and I wanted the microphone control that the 275 offers, to make it easy for her. And also, because it is a small radio, and would have been easy to mount in a modern vehicle. But that was not to be for the reasons I mentioned. I sold my 275 to a Jeep owner. I think a radio such as the Anytone 779-UV (aka Retevis RA-25 or Radioddity DB-20G) are a much better value at around $100, versus the MXT275, but the 275 does meet many of it’s owners’ needs.

Your comments on how you came to buy the Midland are an example of the good job the Midland marketing department has done in acquiring new customers. Midland managed to move the Jeep crowd away from using CB radios, so they could sell more expensive GMRS radios. I congratulate them on a smart business plan. But I don’t drive a Jeep...I drive an Xterra, so I am immune to the marketing ploy 😋. I think Midland has stumbled onto a potential cash cow with it’s marketing of the Jeep crowd, because the folks I know who own Jeeps, work lots of overtime to afford all the mods they do to their vehicles. 

 

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46 minutes ago, WRAM370 said:

I also wanted to like the Midland MXT275, because it was going into my wife’s car, and I wanted the microphone control that the 275 offers, to make it easy for her. And also, because it is a small radio, and would have been easy to mount in a modern vehicle. But that was not to be for the reasons I mentioned. I sold my 275 to a Jeep owner. I think a radio such as the Anytone 779-UV (aka Retevis RA-25 or Radioddity DB-20G) are a much better value at around $100, versus the MXT275, but the 275 does meet many of it’s owners’ needs.

Your comments on how you came to buy the Midland are an example of the good job the Midland marketing department has done in acquiring new customers. Midland managed to move the Jeep crowd away from using CB radios, so they could sell more expensive GMRS radios. I congratulate them on a smart business plan. But I don’t drive a Jeep...I drive an Xterra, so I am immune to the marketing ploy 😋. I think Midland has stumbled onto a potential cash cow with it’s marketing of the Jeep crowd, because the folks I know who own Jeeps, work lots of overtime to afford all the mods they do to their vehicles. 

 

I think the other genius of Midland’s marketing is their advertising as an American company. Obviously the radios are made in China but their assertion as an American company implies a high level of quality and customer service. I know you were “speaking” tongue in cheek, but as a Jeep owner, I can say a lot of Jeep guys/gals tend to favor “American” products, even at higher prices when compared to Chinese alternatives. I guess that’s not surprising considering the history of Jeeps. While Midland’s quality may be a bit overstated, I will say their customer service is top notch. 

I think to summarize I can say I am so disappointed and frustrated because Midland is so close to making some really good products. If they would just implement a few seemingly small changes….

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Midland has also been making radios for 30+ years. My first GMRS radio was a 4 channel crystal radio from Midland. You ordered it with the channel you got licensed on. The other advantage is Midland makes a GMRS radio only. Its not a modified ham radio or other CCR based chip radio. While its not top of the line its built for GMRS and GMRS only. I think that goes along way in the simplicity and use of the radio. For many users that's what hey want. They don't want programming and other complicated items. They want to install it turn it on and use it. Midland has sold many GMRS radios since they started selling them and will continue to sell regardless what you or I want added. 

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3 hours ago, gortex2 said:

Midland has also been making radios for 30+ years. My first GMRS radio was a 4 channel crystal radio from Midland. You ordered it with the channel you got licensed on. The other advantage is Midland makes a GMRS radio only. Its not a modified ham radio or other CCR based chip radio. While its not top of the line its built for GMRS and GMRS only. I think that goes along way in the simplicity and use of the radio. For many users that's what hey want. They don't want programming and other complicated items. They want to install it turn it on and use it. Midland has sold many GMRS radios since they started selling them and will continue to sell regardless what you or I want added. 

While I can't argue their time in the industry,their customer support, or their being pretty much the top on out of the box simplicity, I question the statement about Midland's stuff not being "a modified ham radio or other CCR based chip radio" to be universally applicable.

Take a look at the mxt400 and the tyt th-9000d (which also has a retevis twin) for example, as they appear to be hardware twins. I haven't seen a twin to the mxt115, while the 275 appears to be sold down under as a cb...I also want to say I saw something about it being sold under another brand name, but it's slipping my mind at the moment. I suspect with some digging we'd find a hardware twin to the mxt500 as well.

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57 minutes ago, wayoverthere said:

While I can't argue their time in the industry,their customer support, or their being pretty much the top on out of the box simplicity, I question the statement about Midland's stuff not being "a modified ham radio or other CCR based chip radio" to be universally applicable.

Take a look at the mxt400 and the tyt th-9000d (which also has a retevis twin) for example, as they appear to be hardware twins. I haven't seen a twin to the mxt115, while the 275 appears to be sold down under as a cb...I also want to say I saw something about it being sold under another brand name, but it's slipping my mind at the moment. I suspect with some digging we'd find a hardware twin to the mxt500 as well.

 I also believe the MXT400 and TH-9000D to be hardware twins, although likely with different firmware. The Midland DBR2500 ham radio appears to be a rebadged Anytone AT-778UV. As for the MXT275, it looks similar to the Anytone AT-778U (not UV), but the mic layout is different. I would not be at all surprised if it was built on the same platform.

I believe Midland uses existing models as the basis for their new radios, at least as far as mobile radios are concerned. They may alter the layout somewhat, and modify the firmware, but basically, I believe their radios are based on models sold under other brand names.

Rugged Radios is another vendor that caters to the off-road crowd and also sells rebadged radios. Would anyone care to guess what Rugged's $75 "GMR2" handheld radio is based on? It sure looks a lot like one you can buy on Amazon for between $30 and $40, so why pay $75?

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1 minute ago, WyoJoe said:

 I also believe the MXT400 and TH-9000D to be hardware twins, although likely with different firmware. The Midland DBR2500 ham radio appears to be a rebadged Anytone AT-778UV. As for the MXT275, it looks similar to the Anytone AT-778U (not UV), but the mic layout is different. I would not be at all surprised if it was built on the same platform

Forgot about the dbr2500 too, good catch.

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On 1/22/2022 at 7:01 AM, WROZ437 said:

I think the other genius of Midland’s marketing is their advertising as an American company. Obviously the radios are made in China but their assertion as an American company implies a high level of quality and customer service. I know you were “speaking” tongue in cheek, but as a Jeep owner, I can say a lot of Jeep guys/gals tend to favor “American” products, even at higher prices when compared to Chinese alternatives. I guess that’s not surprising considering the history of Jeeps. While Midland’s quality may be a bit overstated, I will say their customer service is top notch. 

I think to summarize I can say I am so disappointed and frustrated because Midland is so close to making some really good products. If they would just implement a few seemingly small changes….

 

As a fellow Jeep owner, I too became victim to Midland's marketing monster. Having a TJ, room is even tighter than your JKU, and having a radio hanging out in plain sight during top off season made me nervous, so I thought the 275 would be a great replacement for my old CB radio. Being new to the GMRS world, I dove in, got my license, bought the 275, and went to town. It didn't take me long to find the 275's shortcomings, especially since one of our local repeaters used split tones. It wasn't 6 months later that I sold the 275 to a fellow jeeper that just wanted a radio to communicate on jeep runs. I went head first down the rabbit hole, did some research, and ended up with Wouxun's KGXS-20G mobile. 20 watts, so more power than the 275, a very small chassis, so I was able to mount it in front of my console. The mic had controls for the radio, and a speaker in the mic, which proves super handy when traveling with the top down, or a noisy soft top. The dual watch display is super clean and clear, just so many more features to choose from, and room to grow as a GMRS radio nerd to be. And, at $219, while a bit more pricey, if it were to get stolen, I wouldn't cry too much vs. $400-$500 options. I usually just unscrew the mic and toss it in my security drawer under the seat when I'm in a sketchy neighborhood. I liked this radio so much, I bought it's HT brother, the KG935G. It has almost identical features to the mobile, is Part 95e only, no silly computer programming shenanigans to try to make it work as a radio it's not, and the quality so far has met my needs. I now have 3 HT's, 2 different antennas at home and work to use as a base for the HT, and enough coax fittings and coax cable options to choke a horse. I also now host a weekly GMRS net locally to grow community awareness to GMRS, so yeah, I've got the bug pretty bad!

20211012_153234.thumb.jpg.0614167958708c247c6c693e05c74ff1.jpg

 

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On 1/22/2022 at 3:45 PM, gortex2 said:

Midland has also been making radios for 30+ years. My first GMRS radio was a 4 channel crystal radio from Midland. You ordered it with the channel you got licensed on. The other advantage is Midland makes a GMRS radio only. Its not a modified ham radio or other CCR based chip radio. While its not top of the line its built for GMRS and GMRS only. I think that goes along way in the simplicity and use of the radio. For many users that's what hey want. They don't want programming and other complicated items. They want to install it turn it on and use it. Midland has sold many GMRS radios since they started selling them and will continue to sell regardless what you or I want added. 

Yep, I still have one of the original 75-820 CB talkies in perfect working condition, got it in '97 IIRC, and a pair of the original Midland G-11 GMRS radios, with an SMA!! ...got them like ~20 years ago. They used to make much better equipment, tho... nowadays is just not better than CCRs. sadly.

G.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 1/25/2022 at 10:29 AM, bobthetj03 said:

 

As a fellow Jeep owner, I too became victim to Midland's marketing monster. Having a TJ, room is even tighter than your JKU, and having a radio hanging out in plain sight during top off season made me nervous, so I thought the 275 would be a great replacement for my old CB radio. Being new to the GMRS world, I dove in, got my license, bought the 275, and went to town. It didn't take me long to find the 275's shortcomings, especially since one of our local repeaters used split tones. It wasn't 6 months later that I sold the 275 to a fellow jeeper that just wanted a radio to communicate on jeep runs. I went head first down the rabbit hole, did some research, and ended up with Wouxun's KGXS-20G mobile. 20 watts, so more power than the 275, a very small chassis, so I was able to mount it in front of my console. The mic had controls for the radio, and a speaker in the mic, which proves super handy when traveling with the top down, or a noisy soft top. The dual watch display is super clean and clear, just so many more features to choose from, and room to grow as a GMRS radio nerd to be. And, at $219, while a bit more pricey, if it were to get stolen, I wouldn't cry too much vs. $400-$500 options. I usually just unscrew the mic and toss it in my security drawer under the seat when I'm in a sketchy neighborhood. I liked this radio so much, I bought it's HT brother, the KG935G. It has almost identical features to the mobile, is Part 95e only, no silly computer programming shenanigans to try to make it work as a radio it's not, and the quality so far has met my needs. I now have 3 HT's, 2 different antennas at home and work to use as a base for the HT, and enough coax fittings and coax cable options to choke a horse. I also now host a weekly GMRS net locally to grow community awareness to GMRS, so yeah, I've got the bug pretty bad!

20211012_153234.thumb.jpg.0614167958708c247c6c693e05c74ff1.jpg

 

Asking for a friend.  (I run used Kenwoods).  I'm too lazy to read the entire thread so looking for an 'in a nutshell' favorite GMRS only radio for my club's mobile needs.  A few of the guys are running out and grabbing Midlands; if they asked me I'd steer them in another direction (we have repeaters available to us).  One kid is asking now for his rig and with the good luck I've had with my Wouxun 805G HTs I'm leaning him toward the Wouxun brand.

Right track.  Sound like a good review here.  I'll go over to BTWR and look around but would love some feedback.

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8 hours ago, Extreme said:

Asking for a friend.  (I run used Kenwoods).  I'm too lazy to read the entire thread so looking for an 'in a nutshell' favorite GMRS only radio for my club's mobile needs.  A few of the guys are running out and grabbing Midlands; if they asked me I'd steer them in another direction (we have repeaters available to us).  One kid is asking now for his rig and with the good luck I've had with my Wouxun 805G HTs I'm leaning him toward the Wouxun brand.

Right track.  Sound like a good review here.  I'll go over to BTWR and look around but would love some feedback.

For ease of use, mounting options and power/capabilities, you can't beat the KG-1000G which is a 50W SuperHet radio.. If you want something less expensive, the KG-XS20G is a good, small, very capable SOC radio.

For simplicity the Midlands are great - but they're not cheap, they have limited abilities and many/most of the pre 2022 models are narrowband only, which is an issue if you want anyone using a "real" GMRS (wideband) radio to actually be able to hear anything you're saying.

My opinion is based on having/testing/using virtually every mobile GMRS Radio on the market.

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  • 2 months later...
1 hour ago, WRQB993 said:

The MXT500, MXT275  is both wide and narrow band.

Did you mean MXT575?

Anyway - I heard a rumor that the MXT575 50W will be available for purchase very..very.. VERY soon...  I also heard that all of the good GMRS YouTube channels will post a review of the radio on YouTube on the day it is released, which is very..very soon..

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Just now, OffRoaderX said:

Did you mean MXT575?

Anyway - I heard a rumor that the MXT575 50W will be available for purchase very..very.. VERY soon...  I also heard that all of the good GMRS YouTube channels will post a review of the radio on YouTube on the day it is released, which is very..very soon..

Maybe that's what Andrea meant, I cut and pasted directly from the email I received, including the incorrect grammar.

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4 hours ago, WRQB993 said:

I just received this answer back from Midland support when I asked about wide/narrow.

 

The MXT500, MXT275  is both wide and narrow band.

Best regards,

Andrea

At the same time?!? 🤣

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Update -

Me to Midland in email: Can you verify that the MXT275 is in fact wide and narrow band as stated above [in the previous email]? I can not find any documentation on that, and it is not referenced in the user manual.

Midland reply: The MXT275 was updated to wide/narrow band. The MXT275 with the USB-C on the front is the updated wide/narrow band . The older USB-A model is Narrow band only. We are sorry for any confusion.
 

Edited to add from subsequent email -

It is not user-selectable on the MXT275, so yes it is preprogrammed. All MXT275 channels have been preprogrammed narrow band. We do have a firmware update for the MXT275 with USB-C that makes the repeater channels wide band. Unfortunately, these can not be updated in the field. If the order is brought to us, Lanny or I can make sure a particular order is updated before shipment. They are coming from the factory with this firmware loaded, but what is currently being sold has not been updated. 

Edited by WRQB993
Updated info
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1 hour ago, WRQB993 said:

Update -

Me to Midland in email: Can you verify that the MXT275 is in fact wide and narrow band as stated above [in the previous email]? I can not find any documentation on that, and it is not referenced in the user manual.

Midland reply: The MXT275 was updated to wide/narrow band. The MXT275 with the USB-C on the front is the updated wide/narrow band . The older USB-A model is Narrow band only. We are sorry for any confusion.
 

Edited to add from subsequent email -

It is not user-selectable on the MXT275, so yes it is preprogrammed. All MXT275 channels have been preprogrammed narrow band. We do have a firmware update for the MXT275 with USB-C that makes the repeater channels wide band. Unfortunately, these can not be updated in the field. If the order is brought to us, Lanny or I can make sure a particular order is updated before shipment. They are coming from the factory with this firmware loaded, but what is currently being sold has not been updated. 

Thanks for getting that from them.  That sounds like a real botched delivery.

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OK, so I just emailed Midland about this. All of the older USB-A model MXT275 are narrow band only. The new USB-C model MXT275 up to until very recently have shipped as narrow band only. It sounds like they well start shipping from Midland with wide band on the repeater channels, but since not all of their inventory has the update, you need to state you want that firmware/config when ordering so they can update the firmware/config before shipping it. If you have already received a USB-C model or buy one from a retail store it will likely be narrow band only, but you can email Midland Support and then mail your radio in for firmware/config update that sets the repeater channels to wide band.

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