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Midland MXT500


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I guess that's my question. Other than remote head what does the KG offer that a basic GMRS radios does not ? I find that most of the feature people ask for are more for HAM stuff they do than GMRS. Just trying to understand. Quick search shows 30 channels as with Midland. Is it the other bands you listen to that you like the KG better for ? I'll use my APX for that stuff. 

 

I also noted the KG costs the same as the 500.

 

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I guess that's my question. Other than remote head what does the KG offer that a basic GMRS radios does not ? I find that most of the feature people ask for are more for HAM stuff they do than GMRS. Just trying to understand. Quick search shows 30 channels as with Midland. Is it the other bands you listen to that you like the KG better for ? I'll use my APX for that stuff. 
 
I also noted the KG costs the same as the 500.
 

Yes, the KG1000 comes factory configured with 30 standard channels. The difference lies in its ability to add and remove as needed. In my radio I have all the standard channel configurations for consistency, simplicity and compatibility, but I also have 30-40 channels with specific named local and regional repeaters in it, as well as additional slots already pre-configured to receive tones for any repeaters I may encounter in other cities that I wish to enter, name and keep from my travels.

The 1000 also receives NOAA BTW, but has no weather alert capability like some other midlands do.

The 1000 also offers the ability the receive two channels full-time, and/or scan two sets of channels which I use regularly, custom tone support as well as tone scan.

It supports the ability to view channels by channel number, as well as channel number and name, channel number and frequency, which I use regularly. This is superior the scan and dual watch capability of other midlands (IMO). Know frequency is important in some/many GMRS circles.

Yes, it does have the bonus capability of listening to over frequencies, which I admit has come in useful at times, but is not a deal breaker. But in fact I have my GMRS radios also configured to listen to certain amateur frequencies of concern to me as well as MURS and a few others, in much the same way I have my amateur radios set to listen to GMRS too. This is all unnecessary of course in a GMRS radio, but a bonus none-the-less.

No, A GMRS radio does not need 999 memories like the 1000 has, but I have found for my purposes, given other radio constraints, about 128 is good number to have available in an advanced GMRS radio, of course this is my opinion.

I concur that most folks needs will be met with a basic 30 channel unit. But there are those that really want more. I really thought Midland released the radio it would have had more to offer than it does. So I admit I am disappointed in their decision.


Michael
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1 hour ago, mbrun said:


Yes, the KG1000 comes factory configured with 30 standard channels. The difference lies in its ability to add and remove as needed. In my radio I have all the standard channel configurations for consistency, simplicity and compatibility, but I also have 30-40 channels with specific named local and regional repeaters in it, as well as additional slots already pre-configured to receive tones for any repeaters I may encounter in other cities that I wish to enter, name and keep from my travels.

The 1000 also offers the ability the receive two channels full-time, and/or scan two sets of channels which I use regularly, custom tone support as well as tone scan.

Those are the two big ones that make the kg1000g stand out, though the remote head is also a bonus.

My next step from starting with a Midland mxt115 was to a Btech gmrs50x1; the dual watch (actually quad, if you want) and wide receive are nice, as is being able to program in chirp; however, the one big barrier is that you can't add any new transmit channels...what's there is it. For example, I have 2  repeaters I'm range on 462.575 (ch16) with different codes.  For the wouxun, I could save presets for each, and just go to the channel for the one I want to use; on the BTech, i instead have to go into the menu and change tones...not insurmountable, but not convenient either.

While the new midlands are a step in the right direction (especially the 575), it seems Midland is still aiming mostly at the simplex user, with an eye toward the off-road crowd, and the repeater capability is more an afterthought than a focus.

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3 hours ago, kb2ztx said:

I also noted the KG costs the same as the 500.

Today's price;

KG-1000G $369.99 https://www.buytwowayradios.com/wouxun-kg-1000g.html?___SID=U

MXT500 $399.99 https://www.buytwowayradios.com/midland-mxt500.html

This is MSRP on the Midland and I think there's some introductory deals going on that may offer a discount.

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If you all don't mind me sharing an opinion...

I didn't discuss this before my break for obvious reasons, but now that the KG-1000G is in production, I wanted to share some details.

I was invited to be a tester of the KG-1000G prototype when there was only the single unit (the prototype) in existence.  I spent a little more than a week running that rig very, very hard.  It was a fantastic radio and I was really happy with it.  If it wasn't the only one in existence I the time, I would have cut them a check instead of sending it back. 

Though I have never touched the final product, based on the prototype, I feel like you can't go wrong with the KG-1000G.

Now that I have an MXT500 inbound, it should be interesting to see how it measures up to the KG-1000G.  While I think the 500 will turn out to be a good radio, I doubt it will be as nice as the KG-1000G.

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While the new midlands are a step in the right direction (especially the 575), it seems Midland is still aiming mostly at the simplex user, with an eye toward the off-road crowd, and the repeater capability is more an afterthought than a focus.


I agree with those sentiments. Truly seems odd however in light of the fact that the ability to use repeaters is what truly makes GMRS special.


Michael
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I guess I agree on the repeater stuff but as said most of the folks that buy the radio use it simplex. For me and my family all repeaters use same PL. None of us use other repeaters as there are none around. A lot of folks that use it for family communications will be fine with the Midland. And you can still add channels if there is a repeater with a different PL. Again its also pretty quick to change. I would much rather use my APX, but in the KISS method the Midland is great for GMRS only communications. Remember many folks dont know anything other than turn the radio on and talk. Most dont get a license and never talk on a repeater. 

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Then why in the heck does a simplex user, non-geek GMRS'r need 50 frick'n watts of transmit power just to turn the radio on and talk to their buds? At a $400 price tag, with simpleton features? I just don't get it! I got into this hobby with a Midland MXT275. I liked the simple operation, and the mic features as I have it in my Jeep, which is room deprived. my taste for GMRS evolved, and I quickly outgrew the Midland for its lack of features. Bottom line, It's nice to see Midland making an effort to produce a radio that checks some GMRS boxes, but at that price tag, I will take a hard pass. 

 

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48 minutes ago, bobthetj03 said:

Then why in the heck does a simplex user, non-geek GMRS'r need 50 frick'n watts of transmit power just to turn the radio on and talk to their buds? At a $400 price tag, with simpleton features? I just don't get it! I got into this hobby with a Midland MXT275. I liked the simple operation, and the mic features as I have it in my Jeep, which is room deprived. my taste for GMRS evolved, and I quickly outgrew the Midland for its lack of features. Bottom line, It's nice to see Midland making an effort to produce a radio that checks some GMRS boxes, but at that price tag, I will take a hard pass. 

 

 

I guess you're not going to buy a new Cobra / Uniden FM CB for $500, either? LoL 

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22 minutes ago, marcspaz said:

 

I guess you're not going to buy a new Cobra / Uniden FM CB for $500, either? LoL 

How does FM propagate on 11 meters during skip?

I've never tried FM on 10 meters during a band opening.

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9 minutes ago, MichaelLAX said:

How does FM propagate on 11 meters during skip?

I've never tried FM on 10 meters during a band opening.

 

Worldwide when the SFI is up and as we move into solar maximum. In a couple of years, you will be able to talk around the globe with a wet noodle and a watt.

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On 1/7/2022 at 11:03 AM, marcspaz said:

If you all don't mind me sharing an opinion...

I didn't discuss this before my break for obvious reasons, but now that the KG-1000G is in production, I wanted to share some details.

I was invited to be a tester of the KG-1000G prototype when there was only the single unit (the prototype) in existence.  I spent a little more than a week running that rig very, very hard.  It was a fantastic radio and I was really happy with it.  If it wasn't the only one in existence I the time, I would have cut them a check instead of sending it back. 

Though I have never touched the final product, based on the prototype, I feel like you can't go wrong with the KG-1000G.

Now that I have an MXT500 inbound, it should be interesting to see how it measures up to the KG-1000G.  While I think the 500 will turn out to be a good radio, I doubt it will be as nice as the KG-1000G.

I have had mine for almost a year it replaced a Kenwood 8180 and I never looked back. It is in my Jeep and the primary scan is set on a known repeater in the area I am traveling and the second scan is set for all of my programmed channels. Remember you  cannot transmit on channels 8 through 14 as the radio can not meet the low wattage allowed but you can listen in! The Kenwood has become a sort of base station that will reach a repeater 56 miles away.

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  • 3 weeks later...

@Mikeam

I'm a new guy to all of this GMRS stuff, but here's why the KG-1000g or any other non-handheld GMRS can't transmit on channels 8 - 14:

"The popular answer provided in these venues commonly focuses on the wattage limitation imposed by the FCC on these channels. The typical line of reasoning is that these channels have a one half watt transmit limit, and high powered mobile radios simply can't reduce their power to such a low level, so therefore they can't transmit on those channels legally. While the wattage theory does make some sense, and the inability to go below one watt may indeed be the case with some mobile radios, this answer is not actually correct.

The real reason can be easily found within the FCC rules for GMRS. Specifically, the rule in Part 95, Subpart E which limits the frequencies commonly assigned to channels 8-14 to hand-held radios only. Here is the applicable section (from § 95.1763 GMRS channels):

(d) 467 MHz interstitial channels. Only hand-held portable units may transmit on these 7 channels. The channel center frequencies are: 467.5675, 467.5875, 467.6125, 467.6375, 467.6625, 467.6875, and 467.7125 MHz.

Those channel center frequencies are the seven frequencies assigned to GMRS channels 8-14.

In other words, only handheld GMRS radios can transmit on channels 8-14 because, well, you can only transmit on channels 8-14 with a handheld GMRS radio.

Yep, because the FCC said so. That's all it is. And there you go."

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45 minutes ago, RobertHode said:

@MichaelLAX  "... can be easily found within the FCC rules for GMRS. Specifically, the rule in Part 95, Subpart E which limits the frequencies commonly assigned to channels 8-14 to hand-held radios only. Here is the applicable section (from § 95.1763 GMRS channels):

(d) 467 MHz interstitial channels. Only hand-held portable units may transmit on these 7 channels. The channel center frequencies are: 467.5675, 467.5875, 467.6125, 467.6375, 467.6625, 467.6875, and 467.7125 MHz."

 

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Who said this? Certainly not the FCC:

The popular answer provided in these venues commonly focuses on the wattage limitation imposed by the FCC on these channels. The typical line of reasoning is that these channels have a one half watt transmit limit, and high powered mobile radios simply can't reduce their power to such a low level, so therefore they can't transmit on those channels legally. While the wattage theory does make some sense, and the inability to go below one watt may indeed be the case with some mobile radios, this answer is not actually correct.

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Thank you for that information.

So, if I can hold my radio in my hand, I can transmit on Channel 8-14:

 

Channel 8 hand.jpg

I think it is historical as well: before 2017 only FRS radios could transmit on these channels at 0.5 watts, and in the 2017 reorganization, GMRS licensees gained these privileges as well.

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[mention=2812]Mikeam[/mention]
I'm a new guy to all of this GMRS stuff, but here's why the KG-1000g or any other non-handheld GMRS can't transmit on channels 8 - 14:

"The popular answer provided in these venues commonly focuses on the wattage limitation imposed by the FCC on these channels. The typical line of reasoning is that these channels have a one half watt transmit limit, and high powered mobile radios simply can't reduce their power to such a low level, so therefore they can't transmit on those channels legally. While the wattage theory does make some sense, and the inability to go below one watt may indeed be the case with some mobile radios, this answer is not actually correct.

The real reason can be easily found within the FCC rules for GMRS. Specifically, the rule in Part 95, Subpart E which limits the frequencies commonly assigned to channels 8-14 to hand-held radios only. Here is the applicable section (from § 95.1763 GMRS channels):

(d) 467 MHz interstitial channels. Only hand-held portable units may transmit on these 7 channels. The channel center frequencies are: 467.5675, 467.5875, 467.6125, 467.6375, 467.6625, 467.6875, and 467.7125 MHz.

Those channel center frequencies are the seven frequencies assigned to GMRS channels 8-14.

In other words, only handheld GMRS radios can transmit on channels 8-14 because, well, you can only transmit on channels 8-14 with a handheld GMRS radio.

Yep, because the FCC said so. That's all it is. And there you go."


Correct.


Michael
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22 hours ago, RobertHode said:

@Mikeam

I'm a new guy to all of this GMRS stuff, but here's why the KG-1000g or any other non-handheld GMRS can't transmit on channels 8 - 14:

"The popular answer provided in these venues commonly focuses on the wattage limitation imposed by the FCC on these channels. The typical line of reasoning is that these channels have a one half watt transmit limit, and high powered mobile radios simply can't reduce their power to such a low level, so therefore they can't transmit on those channels legally. While the wattage theory does make some sense, and the inability to go below one watt may indeed be the case with some mobile radios, this answer is not actually correct.

The real reason can be easily found within the FCC rules for GMRS. Specifically, the rule in Part 95, Subpart E which limits the frequencies commonly assigned to channels 8-14 to hand-held radios only. Here is the applicable section (from § 95.1763 GMRS channels):

(d) 467 MHz interstitial channels. Only hand-held portable units may transmit on these 7 channels. The channel center frequencies are: 467.5675, 467.5875, 467.6125, 467.6375, 467.6625, 467.6875, and 467.7125 MHz.

Those channel center frequencies are the seven frequencies assigned to GMRS channels 8-14.

In other words, only handheld GMRS radios can transmit on channels 8-14 because, well, you can only transmit on channels 8-14 with a handheld GMRS radio.

Yep, because the FCC said so. That's all it is. And there you go."

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1 minute ago, Mikeam said:

I was referring to page 30 first paragraph of my owners manual that says the KG1000 is not capable of the 1/2 watt power requirement so it is listen only on 8 through 14.

 

Just so you know, you can edit a post or comment that you made by clicking on the three little dots in the upper right corner of the post or comment.

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As I am sure most of us know, Channels 8-14 were classic FRS only channels at 0.5 watts and were added to GMRS with the same power limitation in 2017. 

I once asked someone on this Forum the question of their value and I was told they used them in situations where all of their users were in close proximity of each other, and they experienced less interference from others. 

I am just glad I can access them when and if I need to respond to someone with emergency traffic on those channels.

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